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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » January » 26


ALL POINTS EAST ADDED MORE EVENTS

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 26 Jan 2018 7:00 pm
All Points East just added two new events with Catfish and the Bottlemen, The National, The War On Drugs, Future Islands, Warpaint and more!

THE LOVE SAVES THE DAY LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 26 Jan 2018 7:00 pm
FatBoy Slim and Sampha headline! Bicep (live) Loyle Carner, Hot Since 82, Four Tet (live) and Black Madonna also top the lineup!

THE BUNBURY MUSIC FESTIVAL LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 26 Jan 2018 7:00 pm
Jack White, The Chainsmokers and Blink-182 headline! Post Malone, Incubus, Foster The People, Young The Giant and Dropkick Murphys also top the lineup!

Public Interest Groups Ask for Ownership Rule Changes to be Put on Hold and Special Master to Be Appointed to Oversee FCC Review

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 26 Jan 2018 5:42 pm

As we wrote last week, Prometheus Radio Project and the Media Mobilizing Project have filed an appeal of the FCC’s November decision to eliminate the newspaper-broadcast and radio-television cross-ownership rules and to relax the local TV ownership rules (see our summary here).  These groups have now filed a request – an Emergency Petition for a Writ of Mandamus – asking not only that the Court put the rule changes on hold, but also that the Court appoint a “special master” to oversee the FCC’s further action on the ownership rules.  The request to put these rules on hold could, if adopted, block transactions that are pending or those that parties are planning on filing to take advantage of the changes in the ownership limits.  The request also asks that the case be assigned to judges on the Third Circuit who have dealt with prior appeals of the FCC’s ownership rules and have, in a few cases, overruled those decisions (see, for instance, our article here).

These public interest groups allege that the FCC has ignored prior decisions of the Court which the groups characterize as requiring that the FCC look at the impact of any rule change on minority ownership, and look for ways to enhance ownership diversity, before any changes are made in the ownership rules.  Of course, the same court has also suggested that the FCC do away with the newspaper-broadcast cross-ownership rules and recognized that other changes in the ownership rules (like on JSAs) need not be stopped in their tracks (see our post here on one such order from the Court).  And several broadcast owners previously asked the Third Circuit to wipe all the media ownership rules off the books—creating, in effect, complete deregulation in the industry. While the court declined to do so, it noted that “this remedy, while extreme, might be justified in the future if the Commission does not act quickly to carry out its legislative mandate.”

So the public interest groups’ filing is, as is always the case, one side of the story.  We will be watching to see further developments in this case in the near future.  As the ownership decision is set to go into effect on February 7 (see our post here), if any action is taken on this motion, it would have to be taken quickly.

 

 

Noise generator: a chat with Uchi, as LA celebrates electronic sound

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Fri 26 Jan 2018 12:59 pm

Uchi is a fresh face as LA collective BL_K NOISE meet up with Berlin’s Raster – and that’s a perfect time to catch up with her and reflect.

Dive in, commit. It’s that moment when the mixer fader is up and you start your live set, the let’s-screw-up-our-lives risk-taking bigger moments we make sometimes for musical passion. It’s the willingness to screw up live and screw up life, maybe.

That sums up why a lot of us are here as well as anything. And so that makes Uchi’s approach refreshing. Just as your email promo inbox is full of drab, sound-alike techno and washes of disinterested distorted ambience, Uchi kind of doesn’t follow any rules. Her DJ sets are diverse and daring, her live sets going deep and abstract and back again. And she talks to us a bit here about that abandon.

It’s also paying off. Born in Venezuela but making her name as a came of age in tbe Miami scene, Uchi has made a recent move to new Germany and become a regular at Berlin’s most sought-after slots – including Berghain’s upstairs Panorama Bar and its darker, weirder new ground floor Säule. But the best part is, I think we don’t know quite what she’ll do next. There’s a couple of EPs, a full-length album, and various podcasts coming and … well, the hell with predictability. The artists you want to watch are the ones that will surprise you.

January is definitely when we celebrate new music gear, thanks to Anaheim, California’s massive NAMM convention show. But then why not celebrate new noises, too? BLK_NOISE has assembled for Saturday a party made up of artists willing to push their electronic instruments until they hurt. From team USA, you’ve got Richard Devine, Surachai. From Germany, label Raster – the imprint formerly known as Raster Noton – Grischa Lichtenberger, and label co-founder Byetone. (Carsten Nicolai aka Raster Noton is going solo again, reverting his label to Noton.) And then there’s secretive BLK_NOISE anchor Belief Defect, who have feet in both Berlin and LA.

And then there’s Uchi. Let’s get a soundtrack: here’s a CDM exclusive debut, off her upcoming EP. Ingredients: KORG ElecTribe ER-1 [synth], Moog Minifooger [MF] Delay, Eventide Space reverb and “rat distortion.” (I think she means Pro Co RAT, but — this is New York, so…. it could have been, like, an actual rat.)

PK: What’s the set you’re preparing for LA? I loved this noise set that just streamed from Halcyon [in New York].

Uchi: I don’t know what happened there! It’s so weird! I have the recording of it myself; I gotta hear it and see!

I think for this show I’m going to use somewhat similar setup I’ve been using for most noise shows these days, a narrow selection of stuff, and complete improvisation — or zero preliminary sequencing. It’s the first time I’ll try an AV setup, which is exciting!

It seems like you’ve had some pretty significant shifts in your life, your musical direction … especially as some of the folks who will be hearing you in LA as well as our readers may not know you yet, what’s the trajectory been from Miami to Berlin? How did you get where you are currently?

Yeah, I guess there’s been a lot of changes the last couple of years. I lived in Miami since age 10, up until college. After I finished a degree in Computer Science, I took DJing (obtained from radio hosting at University) more seriously, as well as actually working on something I used to do for fun — (Ableton fiddling) making music.

The Boiler Room set came about from Juan Del Valle, now a friend. His influence was to convince me to make a live set. That being said, it was my first live set ever, and it was on Boiler Room – lol! BUT it was a great way to learn how to use hardware! Then Berlin came after the release on Plangent Records, which made the first gig in Panorama Bar happen. That made me decide not to get a flight home, basically.

The interesting thing is that just before I left Miami, everything had already started changing. I was pretty active in the noise scene, which was a whole different level of exploration in music, the exact opposite of composition and programming or what I used to make the Boiler Room set. Noise changed also the way I record, too. It seems I find single takes, and master out mixes more interesting than spending hours on a single detail or mixing down. I guess trying to finish ideas in one day if the case has a lot of details, otherwise just simple pressing record (mistakes included) and room recordings.

I made the album and the last couple EPs basically playing them. Since moving to Europe, which changed literally everything about what I knew, and also playing for promoters in different cities, I’ve had the chance to do something different. Nowadays, I’m combining all influences together — noise improvisation, changing patterns, speed, writing melodies or lack thereof, depending on so many different things. For instance where, when, and for whom each show is prepared for, relative to time, and where things are for me at the moment — it’s never the same. I’m still figuring it out, but if there is something to expect, it should be to expect something new.

These Saüle appearances have been great … in this age and (city!) people can cling to a somewhat narrow and clasutrophobic view of genre, so that’s a relief. Can you talk a little bit about you’ve been playing lately?

Well, I guess Säule was a bit of the turning point. It made me realize its not far-fetched to combine everything into one presentation. Funny you say claustrophobic view of genre! That puts it a bit better in perspective actually. I think the first time was probably one of the most liberating DJ sets of my life, the first time I felt like myself. The struggle of genre has been real for a really long time, but thanks to that lately, I reeeally don’t care for dance floor “rules” too much, and follow just, whatever feels right at the time. I’m curious to what you would describe those gigs as.

Mmm, eclectic? This is why I wouldn’t really call myself a music journalist, just a musician. So to that — what are you using to play for this live set? Not just to sort of get gear-focused, but instead — what does this mean as far as instrumentation, as composition?

For sure, it will be a Moog Mother [Mother-32 synthesizer] running, pitching it sporadically, plus vocal whale sounds … maybe some screaming. Also some Koma Elektronik noises generated from the Field Kit [“electro-acoustic workstation”] and BD101 [analog gate-delay pedal] as main effects, messing with any signal sent to the aux [input] of the Field Kit.

I guess as “composition,” I suppose breaking it down by frequency – the vocal stuff is a lot of mid-range melodic, of course, with a ton of reverb and delay, the Moog for low-end and the Koma stuff for texture, high-pitch screeching, and pulsating static. These have been my favorite pieces of gear to use for noise shows. I made the last album using the Moog heavily, so it’s kind of been my main instrument for almost two years, along with Koma stuff which is heaven for noise freaks — the Moog sounds on another level! And some classic reverb and distortion pedals, Boss DS-1 [distortion pedal, since 1978] and Eventide Space.

What do those instruments mean to you; how do they impact how you play spontaneously?

They are my children!!! I supposed their user interface totally affects how they are played. For example, the large knobs of the Mother and the semi-modular part for patching and combining it with it with the BD10 light sensor (which kind of acts like a theremin), and putting that in the Field Kit mixer, which has got a life of its own. The signals kind of bounce with each other. Feed-backing is waaay fun. Also, the continuity of LFO’s makes it easy to do multiple things at once. Whatever instruments I’m using at the moment play a really large role in every live set, if not the biggest role. I hope to be switching to full-on modular this year! Wish me luck.

Thanks, Uchi!

If you’re in LA, check out the event! I wrote about Belief Defect’s live rig here and for Native Instruments; now it’s America’s turn to get that live. Co-hosted with Decibel Festival:

[BL__K NOISE]: Raster Label Showcase

https://www.facebook.com/uchpuch/

Photos courtesy the artist.

The post Noise generator: a chat with Uchi, as LA celebrates electronic sound appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Singing for Asian Autocrats

Delivered... Kerstin Klenke | Scene | Fri 26 Jan 2018 8:00 am

Jennifer Lopez, Kanye West and Rod Stewart did it. They pimped their income by playing court musicians in Central Asia. This places them at the heart of very dirty politics. Do they care? Do we care? From the Norient book Seismographic Sounds (see and order here).

Here, he is not performing for an autocrat: a masked Kanye West in Los Angeles on his «Yeezus Tour» (Photo © by U2soul, 2013)

Jennifer Lopez did it in Turkmenistan, Kanye West in Kazakhstan, Rod Stewart, Julio Iglesias, Ennio Morricone and Lara Fabian in Uzbekistan. Sting, too, did it in Uzbekistan – and then almost again in Kazakhstan. Certainly, somebody did it in Kyrgyzstan and Tadjikistan.

To perform for authoritarian rulers or their family members in the post-Soviet world has become a lucrative business among the stars and superstars of international pop. Whenever journalists manage to uncover artists’ public or semi-private adventures of this kind in Central Asia or other postsocialist states, events follow an almost ritualised pattern: on the part of the western press, there are harsh accusations of inexcusable political ignorance to spiralling poverty, large-scale corruption, extensive exploitation, rampant nepotism and horrendous torture in the respective countries. On the part of the artists, these accusations are countered with remorseful avowals of exactly this inexcusable political ignorance – either in a self-chastening variant («Had only I known, I would not have performed!»), or by blaming others («Had only my management worked properly, I would not have performed!»). Very rarely do artists muster the breathtakingly paternalistic chutzpah of Sting and defend these performances as musical development aid for a culturally isolated, deprived and suffering people.

A Three Million Dollar Wedding Gig

Artists’ attempts at concocting convincing subterfuges are mostly bizarre in nature. No less bizarre, however, is the tremendous media outrage that their musical excursions into the post-Soviet East regularly evoke in the first place. It seems quite quixotic to expect artists in this league (or artists in general, for that matter) to act as moral role models when dealing with the excesses of Central Asian sultanism and its likes. How come we seriously expect Kanye West to decline an (alleged) three million US dollar offer for playing the wedding of the Kazakh president’s grandson due to political scruples? This, I would claim, has less to do with insights into Kanye West’s political convictions and conscience than with the tenacity with which we like to cling to the romantic idea of artists as being oppositional – as if this profession were primordially or intrinsically loaded with the task of exposing and fighting the bad in the world. This, however, is more of a moralistic fantasy than an expectation informed by reality. After all, in the global history of music, considerably more musicians have aligned or arranged themselves with political power (even of the most dubious and violent kind) than denounced or resisted it—not only, but very often for economic reasons.

Why, then, do we so insistently expect political opposition from musicians, or at least «political awareness»? Because it puts us in the pleasant company of heroes and heroines, many probably decidedly more heroic than ourselves? (Honestly, who of us has ever thought or done much about the political situation in Central Asia?) Because it elevates us to the comfortable position of moral superiority from which to criticize those musicians who do not meet our expectations? Whatever our reasons, maintaining political opposition as a template for musicianship will tell us little about those artists that are unwilling or unable to become heroes and heroines – and that is probably about 95% of all musicians worldwide. It will also help us little in comprehending the relation between musicians, power and money in Central Asian thought. And all of this, unfortunately, leaves us with very little to know and say about the topic at all.

The text was published first as a very short quote in the second Norient book Seismographic Sounds. Click on the image to know more.

Read More on Norient

> Renato Martins: «Money, Cars, Motorbikes, and Planes»

Read More on the Web

> Sean Michaels: «Kanye West plays lucrative gig for controversial Kazakhstan president»
> Miriam Elder: «Jennifer Lopez sparks controversy with show for Turkmenistan president»

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