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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » February » 06


THE FORECASTLE FESTIVAL DAY LINEUPS ARE OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 7:00 pm
Bon Iver, The National, Modest Mouse, David Byrne all headline! Tyler The Creator, Ray Lamontagne, Anderson .Paak and The Free Nationals, Spoon and Grizzly Bear also top the lineup!

THE BESTIVAL LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 7:00 pm
London Grammar and M.I.A headline, with one headliner TBA! Also Rudimental, Django Django, Goldie and more!

THE SPRING AWAKENING LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 7:00 pm
deadmau5, Alison Wonderland, Hardwell, Tiesto, Dash Berlin, Carnage, Borgore3lau, Flux Pavilion and more are all in!

THE SLOSS MUSIC FESTIVAL DAY LINEUPS ARE OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 7:00 pm
Friday: Arcade Fire, Jason Isbell Vance Joy, Moon Taxi and Vic Mensa! Saturday: Chris Stapleton, GRiZ, St, Paul and the Broken Bones, The War On Drugs and Louis The Child! Day Tickets this week!

FCC to Randomly Inspect TV Stations Repacked by the Incentive Auction

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 6:15 pm

The FCC yesterday released a Public Notice indicating that they will be inspecting approximately 60 of the over 900 TV stations changing channels as a result of the incentive auction and the repacking of the TV spectrum that took place after that auction.  The FCC notice says that it is hiring contract employees who will conduct these inspections on a randomly selected set of stations to assess the equipment that they have on hand and will be replacing when moving to their new channel. The stations are seeking reimbursement from the FCC’s $1.75 billion pool of money set aside to reimburse stations for equipment that needs to be replaced to allow the stations to operate on their new channels.

The notice says that the FCC will be assessing the “existence and functionality” of the equipment for which reimbursement is sought.  The FCC seems to be saying that it will be making sure that stations really have the equipment that they are seeking to replace through reimbursement funds.  The “functionality” aspect may be an assessment as to whether that equipment really needs to be replaced, though the notice does not specifically make that statement.  The approximately 60 stations selected at random will be used as a statistical sample to assess the reliability of repacking estimates provided by stations to the FCC.  Nothing forecloses the FCC from conducting further audits in the future.  So if you have a TV station that has been repacked, and the FCC comes knocking, you will know what the inspection is all about.

FCC to Randomly Inspect TV Stations Repacked by the Incentive Auction

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 6:15 pm

The FCC yesterday released a Public Notice indicating that they will be inspecting approximately 60 of the over 900 TV stations changing channels as a result of the incentive auction and the repacking of the TV spectrum that took place after that auction.  The FCC notice says that it is hiring contract employees who will conduct these inspections on a randomly selected set of stations to assess the equipment that they have on hand and will be replacing when moving to their new channel. The stations are seeking reimbursement from the FCC’s $1.75 billion pool of money set aside to reimburse stations for equipment that needs to be replaced to allow the stations to operate on their new channels.

The notice says that the FCC will be assessing the “existence and functionality” of the equipment for which reimbursement is sought.  The FCC seems to be saying that it will be making sure that stations really have the equipment that they are seeking to replace through reimbursement funds.  The “functionality” aspect may be an assessment as to whether that equipment really needs to be replaced, though the notice does not specifically make that statement.  The approximately 60 stations selected at random will be used as a statistical sample to assess the reliability of repacking estimates provided by stations to the FCC.  Nothing forecloses the FCC from conducting further audits in the future.  So if you have a TV station that has been repacked, and the FCC comes knocking, you will know what the inspection is all about.

Ableton Live 10 arrives: how you’ll use it, what it means for Max for Live

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 5:26 pm

After weeks of watching Ableton’s trainers and testers have the fun, Live 10 is now the current version. Here’s what that means for you.

Live 10 is now the official release version of Ableton Live. If you didn’t jump on the discounted upgrade or preorder pricing, that’s done. Live reverts to its original pricing and retains the same editions Live 9 had (Suite, Standard, Intro).

What you get with Live 10: lots of new Devices including the Wavetable synth and Echo multi-engine delay, automatic Capture of your ideas before you hit record, improved editing of MIDI and audio especially in the Arrange view, lots of additional sounds, more Push integration, and a faster, more integrated Max for Live. It’s also much easier on the eyes, certainly on Retina displays, but across the board.

Now, in those intervening weeks, a lot of people have gotten their hands on the software. I’ve been using Live 10 betas since early fall. Here’s what I’ve found, comparing my own personal experience with other Live users, both advanced and novice.

Live 10’s highlights

Arrangement view finally feels fleshed out. Editing multiple MIDI clips in Arrange, being able to directly manipulate audio, and navigating Arrange more quickly is really essential. I really hope Ableton continue to develop this area – and that some day we even see the sort of hardware integration with Arrange that we do with Push and Session view.

You’re going to use Drum Buss a whole lot. Drum Buss sounds like a specific drum compressor. That’s even how Ableton markets it. In practice, its combination of dynamics processing and “crunch” turn out to be pretty useful all over the place, especially since its simplified controls can be used in a variety of ways to dial in very different results.

Echo and Wavetable are really beautiful. Do you need another delay and another synth? Well, maybe not. Do these add character to the release? Absolutely. Look, lots of DAWs use pack-in instruments and effects to try to earn your loyalty and upgrades. Ableton is arguably a little different in that some of these designs are so specific to the software maker as to make little sense elsewhere – think Operator or Simpler. For me, though – and your experience may be different – the new devices were an easy test. I had Live 9 on my MacBook and Live 10 on my Razer for quite a while. I was comfortable enough switching back to 9 to work on lots of projects. But it was the devices that often made me migrate over to 10 again.

Push is more useful for editing. The addition of the melodic step sequencing layout (which combines real-time entry and sequencing), the ability to work on MIDI patterns on Push, and new device support continue to make Push feel essential.

Groups inside Groups. There are a lot of usability improvements, but I think you could say this is the most important one. I can’t tell you why exactly subgroups make the whole use of groups more useful, but they do. I find myself using groups a lot more – and I know of all the usability improvements people asked for that appeared in Live 10, this was the most significant.

There are a lot of other improvement here that may require adapting a bit. Capture is something found in DAWs like Cubase, but oddly it’s easy to forget that you don’t have to hit record to grab ideas. The Arrange view’s new features require some investment of time learning shortcuts and the like – and that pays off. And you should invest some time in organizing your Library to exploit that nice new browser, for sure.

For a complete run-down of what’s new:

Ableton Live 10 in depth: hands-on impressions, what’s new

What does Max for Live integration do?

We’ve been talking to Ableton now for years about their ideas for better integrating the ideas of Cycling ’74, who make Max/MSP, and Ableton themselves, even before Ableton bought Cycling.

The big thing you’ll notice right away is that Max for Live is integrated with Live – that is, you won’t see a separate load screen. It’s “built in.”

But there’s more to it than just that, which CDM has confirmed with Ableton:

Max is better, faster, stronger, etc. Max itself has been optimized, improving device load time and CPU load, plus a lot of bug fixes.

Versions are in lockstep. Since Live and Max are integrated, you can’t accidentally run the “wrong” version of Max. This also means that a sound pack that supports a particular version of Live won’t run into a compatibility problem with an out-of-sync version of Max.

The future is surround. One easy-to-miss improvement is really an important one: Max for Live support for multichannel audio mixing opens up new possibilities for multichannel setups.

Max 8 is coming! When Max 8 ships, it’ll include the internal improvements found now in Max for Live, plus new Max 8 features for people making their own patches.

So, that’s the good news. Now, the bad news: while we’ve been promised more integration of Max and Live, they remain separate products. Standalone Max licenses may have features that don’t become available in Max for Live. And while eventually Max 8 features will come to Live 10, it sounds like there will be a lag while Ableton tests those features.

Ableton describe this as “lockstep” versions of Max and Live, but – if the versions come out at different times with different features and there’s a lag as they test integration, that’s obviously not lockstep in regards to Max. At least you have one installer and one version as far as Live and Max for Live.

We’ll keep talking to Ableton and Cycling as the Max 8 release gets closer to fully grasp how this is working, and how the closer partnership of the two companies would shape this over time. The reality here still seems to lag what we’ve been promised in terms of Max and Live being integrated and the two developers acting as one.

What might hold you back?

Live 10 doesn’t make any advances in allowing you to integrate custom hardware. As other software has added support for OSC and other protocols, or integrated native scripting, Ableton mostly keeps that kind of integration accessible to hardware vendors. (Hopefully with official support for polyphonic MIDI expression announced, Ableton will follow soon. That may be an edge case, but it’s an edge case that tends to use Live!)

That said, some quiet improvements to Max for Live regarding System Exclusive data support and custom control surface creation now became a lot more useful. MIDI-CI, a new technique for automatically configuring hardware, could combine with Max for Live in interesting ways. (My only concern there: native support would be better.)

Live is also at the pricier end of DAWs available today, for both new and existing users. Users are of course also weighing the price of this as they budget, and I know that’s been a disincentive for some of you for whom money is tight. I can’t personally say what software should cost, as unlike hardware, you can’t calculate what it costs to make. But if you don’t have the money for this, I feel your pain – been there.

By the way, if you preordered Live, you aren’t automatically charged. So you can still back out if you’re not in the financial state you thought you might be – check refund/return pricing and contact support if you need.

But I do think that Live 10 is among a handful of Live upgrades over the years that seem to make everyone happy once they take the plunge. If Live is what you use most of the time, if you’re productive in the Live workflow more than other DAWs, should you get the Live 10 upgrade? Yes. That’s an easy answer.

We’ll look a bit more at some of the devices in future and can discuss that – plus the state of other software. Stay tuned.

https://www.ableton.com/en/live/

The post Ableton Live 10 arrives: how you’ll use it, what it means for Max for Live appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

James Blake review – cyborg pop warmed by human touch

Delivered... Chal Ravens | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 12:06 pm

Roundhouse, London
Blake tests new material for his forthcoming album with each freshly unveiled song sounding totally different from the last

A radical spectacle is taking place at this James Blake gig. Abandoning his piano and unfolding his long limbs, he’s finishing his first UK show in over a year by standing at the front of the Roundhouse stage. His cracked falsetto sounds relaxed enough, but the physical requirements of being a frontman seem new; his only concession to them is a geriatric shuffle.

Tonight is a chance for Blake to test material expected to appear on his fourth album, some of which he has to restart as he falters with his loop pedal. Recalling his dubstep-influenced early EPs, Blake’s voice on new single If the Car Beside You Moves Ahead stutters like a malfunctioning droid – apparently the result of hours of studio manipulation – yet he recreates the effect live, leaving the audience perceptibly wowed. It’s uncanny and impressive; a cyborg pop concept warmed by human touch.

Continue reading...

Groove Rider GR-16 1.2.5 brings more new features than are easy to list in a title

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 6 Feb 2018 12:53 am

Groove Rider GR-16 only arrived at the end of December and already it’s had a bunch of updates, this being the 6th, and all in less than 2 months. I think that’s pretty impressive by any standards. This update comes with what looks like a load of user requested updates and features, plus the usual big fixes, although there aren’t too many of those to be honest.

Anyway, here’s the full list of what’s new in Groove Rider GR-16 1.2.5:

  • added IAA host sync with transport control support;
  • added an icon on the display, indicating that either Link or IAA sync is currently active;
  • velocity pads feature added (vertical and radial type), which can be turned on for specific part in the Part parameters menu;
  • SHIFT button’s touch area expanded;
  • now you can press Shift+Play to immediately play newly selected (blinking) pattern during playback without having to wait for current pattern to end;
  • added: in the Patterns selector, left-swipe pattern’s name to reveal the red “Init” button;
  • added: chain stop option for patterns chaining;
  • added: arpeggiator hold, tap the TouchPad with the second finger while holding the first one (or tap Shift+TouchPad as an alternative);
  • added step trigger conditions in the notes editor. They can be assigned to every note by changing the “Condition” parameter (previously called “Chance”);
  • tapping the BPM in the top header of display now immediately opens the pattern’s tempo parameter menu for convenience;
  • part color icon in the bottom right corner of display is replaced with the Mute icon, which indicates, if selected part is currently being muted or not. Tapping this icon will mute/unmute selected part without needing to enter the MUTE mode;
  • fixed: arpeggiator was gradually going out of sync with the pattern, if was played in the long run;
  • fixed: stems/audio export was incorrect when the Link sync was on and connected;
  • 8 new factory patterns added (“Back to the Roots” track), which contains new step trigger conditions written in its notes as an example;
  • lots of minimal bug fixes.

Groove Rider GR-16 costs $18.99 on the app store:

The post Groove Rider GR-16 1.2.5 brings more new features than are easy to list in a title appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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