Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » May


LABS is a free series of sound tools for everyone, and you’ll want it now

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 31 May 2018 5:41 pm

Everyone’s talking these days it seems about new users and finding an entry way into production. But Spitfire’s take is pretty irresistible: give you some essential sounds you can use anywhere, then charge you … nothing.

Spitfire Audio are a little bit like the “recording studio, engineers, and world-class rented orchestra” you … never had. These are exceptionally detailed sample libraries, including collaborations with Hans Zimmer and Ólafur Arnalds.

LABS is something different. Spitfire says they’re planning a series of these bite-sized sample library instruments, integrated as plug-ins for Mac and Windows / all DAWs. Since they are more focused, they’re also smaller – so we’re talking a few hundred megs instead of many gigs of content, meaning you also don’t have to think about plugging in an external drive just to install. A new build of their online tool goes and grabs them for you.

VST/AU/AAX/Mac/Windows … free:

https://www.spitfireaudio.com/labs/

Now, just describing it, that sounds not all that exciting – plenty of sample houses offer freebies to get you hooked. But LABS’ debut two entries are something special. There’s an intimate “soft piano” that’s good enough that I temporarily got distracted for half an hour playing even on my QWERTY keyboard in Abeton before I remembered I was supposed to be doing something. It’s beautiful and delicate with loads of sounds of the piano action and … it’s sort of hard not to make some film score with it. (Plugging in a hammer action keyboard was, of course, better.)

Grab those downloads … and more arrive every month. (Here seen alongside their paid libraries.)

There’s also an essentials string ensemble that covers the bread-and-butter articulations you need, exceptionally well recorded on a 40-piece ensemble.

All of this is wrapped into a minimalistic interface, made in collaboration with UsTwo – the folks who did the hit game Monument Valley. Spitfire tells me that something like six to nine months of work between them and UsTwo led to the final design.

Dial in specific settings using the minimal interfaces, designed by the creators of Monument Valley.

LABS has just these settings so far, but they’re already pretty engaging.

This minimalism, from sound selections to interface, almost demands experimentation. You know, there’s a reason so many keyboards have pianos at patch 00 – we’re all often imagining a piano sound or string sound in our heads. It’s just rare you get one you’d want to return to, which is what this is. And I suspect for more adventurous producers and electronic work, the perfectly-recorded, back-to-basics nature of these selections will be perfect for transformation. (So you can weave them into electronic textures, and reverse and chop them up and re-pitch them and so on – all with good source material.)

And, of course, the price is right.

LABS is part of a larger project, with more sounds coming, also for free, monthly. Spitfire promises both more of these basic starting points for new producers or musicians wanting to cover their basic ingredients (like the samples you’ll want on your internal SSD and not just the big external drive), plus a testing bed for experiments in sound design and projects they want feedback on. (It’s not a freemium model, then – it’s more like a free laboratory, rather like what I was discussing yesterday around modules in VCV Rack, but for soundware. I wonder if we’ll see this elsewhere.)

There’s also a content plan around the sounds, a notebook of projects and ideas to go with the LABS sound downloads.

It’s also nice to see soundware companies pushing to increase the value of live musicians and composers/sound designers, rather than engage in a race to the bottom. I’ve heard some real concerns around the industry about the subscription model for sounds, and whether it will do to sound designers and recording artists what Spotify and iTunes Music streaming have done to record labels – but it seems the players in this industry really are committed to finding models that do something different. (Getting into this is obviously a matter for another day.)

Here’s their statement, whether you buy into that or not:

It remains Spitfire’s ethos to use live performances where possible, but when up against time and budget, Spitfire is the next best thing. By paying the players and collaborators royalties, Spitfire Audio helps sustain an incredible part of our musical heritage at the same time as championing innovation within it.

The plug-ins are free forever, not for a limited time. We’ll be watching to see what’s next.

Download:

https://www.spitfireaudio.com/labs/

The post LABS is a free series of sound tools for everyone, and you’ll want it now appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Dealing with a Local Political Candidate Who Appears in a Spot Advertisement for a Commercial Business

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 31 May 2018 5:28 pm

With election season upon us again, I’ve had one question that has come up repeatedly in the last few weeks about local candidates – usually running for state or municipal offices – who appear in advertisements for local businesses that they own or manage. Often times, these individuals will routinely appear in a business’ ads outside of election season, and the candidate simply wants to continue to appear on their business’ ads during the election as well. We wrote about this question in an article published two years ago, and since the question has been coming up again, it is worth revisiting the subject. What is a station to do when a local advertiser decides to run for office?

While we have many times written about what happens when a broadcast station’s on-air employee runs for office (see, for instance, our articles here, here and here), we have addressed the question less often about the advertiser who is also a candidate. If a candidate’s recognizable voice or, for TV, image appears on a broadcast station in a way that is not negative (e.g. it is not in an ad attacking that candidate), outside of an exempt program (in other words outside of a news or news interview program which, as we wrote here, is a very broad category of programming exempt from the equal time rules) that appearance is a “use” by the political candidate. “Uses” can arise well outside the political sphere, so Arnold Schwarzenegger movies were pulled from TV when he was running for office, as were any re-runs of The Apprentice and The Celebrity Apprentice featuring Donald Trump. An appearance by a candidate in a commercial for his or her local business is a “use” which needs to be included in a station’s political file (providing all the information about the sponsor, schedule and price of the ad that you would for any pure political buy). But that does not necessarily mean that a station needs to pull the ad from the air.

As a commercial for a business is usually a paid spot, where the station is receiving money to air the ad (and not an unpaid one like the appearance in an entertainment program where the station does not get paid to air its comedy program or movie in which a candidate appears), a “use” arising in a paid commercial gives rise to equal opportunities for other opposing candidates to buy time on the station. The station will not usually be required to provide free time to opposing candidates (but watch for candidate appearances in PSAs, as that might give rise to free time for opposing candidates). If the station has plenty of commercial inventory and does not mind selling spots to the opposing candidate for the lowest unit rates that apply during the political windows (45 days before a primary and 60 days before a general election) to spots purchased by a candidate’s authorized campaign committee (the opposing candidate gets lowest unit rate for a spot run in connection with his or her campaign, even if the commercial business bought the spot featuring their employee-candidate at regular commercial rates), a station may decide to continue to air the business spots with the candidate’s appearance. But if inventory is tight, or the station is not selling political ads to candidates in a particular state or local race, the station may want to tell the business that the candidate can’t appear in the business’ spots once the candidate becomes legally qualified, as the running of those spots with the candidates would require the station to provide equal time to the opposing candidates.

Note that the “no censorship” provision of the Communications Act and the lowest unit rate provisions likely do not apply to the business spots even though they contain the voice or image of a candidate. That is because these spots are not uses by the candidate or the candidate’s authorized campaign committee which are covered by the rules providing for lowest unit rates and the “no censorship” provisions of the law. As the commercial spots are not by the candidate or his or her political committee, but instead they are commercials by a business that happen to be “uses,” normal commercial rates can be applied.

Note, also, that business spots that advertise a business in which the candidate’s name appears, but where the candidate him or herself do not appear by voice or picture, do not trigger any equal opportunity issues. It is the recognizable voice or picture of the candidate that triggers the equal opportunity and public file issues. For those of us here in the DC area, we are accustomed to seeing ads for the local Volvo dealer even during election season, even though that dealership is named after a politician currently serving in Congress.

As in all areas of political broadcasting, any analysis of the implications of any on-air appearance of a candidate can be a very nuanced matter, and small changes in the facts can result in big changes in the legal conclusions that apply. So if these situations arise, consult with the station’s legal counsel before making any decision as to how to treat these kinds of ads. This article is just meant to note that there may be options for dealing with the candidate-advertiser if he or she wants to stay on their business’ spots during an election period, depending on the station’s circumstances. For more general information about the rules that apply to political broadcasting, see our Guide to Political Broadcasting, here.

Dealing with a Local Political Candidate Who Appears in a Spot Advertisement for a Commercial Business

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 31 May 2018 5:28 pm

With election season upon us again, I’ve had one question that has come up repeatedly in the last few weeks about local candidates – usually running for state or municipal offices – who appear in advertisements for local businesses that they own or manage. Often times, these individuals will routinely appear in a business’ ads outside of election season, and the candidate simply wants to continue to appear on their business’ ads during the election as well. We wrote about this question in an article published two years ago, and since the question has been coming up again, it is worth revisiting the subject. What is a station to do when a local advertiser decides to run for office?

While we have many times written about what happens when a broadcast station’s on-air employee runs for office (see, for instance, our articles here, here and here), we have addressed the question less often about the advertiser who is also a candidate. If a candidate’s recognizable voice or, for TV, image appears on a broadcast station in a way that is not negative (e.g. it is not in an ad attacking that candidate), outside of an exempt program (in other words outside of a news or news interview program which, as we wrote here, is a very broad category of programming exempt from the equal time rules) that appearance is a “use” by the political candidate. “Uses” can arise well outside the political sphere, so Arnold Schwarzenegger movies were pulled from TV when he was running for office, as were any re-runs of The Apprentice and The Celebrity Apprentice featuring Donald Trump. An appearance by a candidate in a commercial for his or her local business is a “use” which needs to be included in a station’s political file (providing all the information about the sponsor, schedule and price of the ad that you would for any pure political buy). But that does not necessarily mean that a station needs to pull the ad from the air.

As a commercial for a business is usually a paid spot, where the station is receiving money to air the ad (and not an unpaid one like the appearance in an entertainment program where the station does not get paid to air its comedy program or movie in which a candidate appears), a “use” arising in a paid commercial gives rise to equal opportunities for other opposing candidates to buy time on the station. The station will not usually be required to provide free time to opposing candidates (but watch for candidate appearances in PSAs, as that might give rise to free time for opposing candidates). If the station has plenty of commercial inventory and does not mind selling spots to the opposing candidate for the lowest unit rates that apply during the political windows (45 days before a primary and 60 days before a general election) to spots purchased by a candidate’s authorized campaign committee (the opposing candidate gets lowest unit rate for a spot run in connection with his or her campaign, even if the commercial business bought the spot featuring their employee-candidate at regular commercial rates), a station may decide to continue to air the business spots with the candidate’s appearance. But if inventory is tight, or the station is not selling political ads to candidates in a particular state or local race, the station may want to tell the business that the candidate can’t appear in the business’ spots once the candidate becomes legally qualified, as the running of those spots with the candidates would require the station to provide equal time to the opposing candidates.

Note that the “no censorship” provision of the Communications Act and the lowest unit rate provisions likely do not apply to the business spots even though they contain the voice or image of a candidate. That is because these spots are not uses by the candidate or the candidate’s authorized campaign committee which are covered by the rules providing for lowest unit rates and the “no censorship” provisions of the law. As the commercial spots are not by the candidate or his or her political committee, but instead they are commercials by a business that happen to be “uses,” normal commercial rates can be applied.

Note, also, that business spots that advertise a business in which the candidate’s name appears, but where the candidate him or herself do not appear by voice or picture, do not trigger any equal opportunity issues. It is the recognizable voice or picture of the candidate that triggers the equal opportunity and public file issues. For those of us here in the DC area, we are accustomed to seeing ads for the local Volvo dealer even during election season, even though that dealership is named after a politician currently serving in Congress.

As in all areas of political broadcasting, any analysis of the implications of any on-air appearance of a candidate can be a very nuanced matter, and small changes in the facts can result in big changes in the legal conclusions that apply. So if these situations arise, consult with the station’s legal counsel before making any decision as to how to treat these kinds of ads. This article is just meant to note that there may be options for dealing with the candidate-advertiser if he or she wants to stay on their business’ spots during an election period, depending on the station’s circumstances. For more general information about the rules that apply to political broadcasting, see our Guide to Political Broadcasting, here.

15 Leftfield House And Disco Anthems From Berlin’s Sadly Closed Soju Bar Club

Delivered... By Finn Johannsen and Hyun Wanner | Scene | Thu 31 May 2018 11:03 am

In the early to mid-oughts, minimal techno and tech house ruled most of Berlin’s dance floors. But alongside this more mainstream music movement, there was a parallel scene dedicated to playing records that were not played elsewhere. Seasoned house and disco DJ legends were invited, and gradually strong local and international networks began to plant roots and grow a culture dedicated to digging for more obscure and leftfield sounds. Styles like vintage house, Italo, post-punk, Afrobeat, Balearic, yacht rock and even more specialized musical niches began to dominate these scenes.

The daring eclecticism of this community created an openness that later would go on to inspire many of the tracks that are being played in clubs and festivals today. Call Super and Hunee (pictured above) both came out of this world.

And from 2010 to 2013, a club called Soju Bar was Berlin’s hotspot for this special corner of night life. It was located in the backroom of the Korean street food bistro Angry Chicken—itself an extension of the popular Kimchi Princess restaurant around the corner. The club’s sound system was above average, and the room was decorated with loving attention to detail and an impressive replica of Korean bar culture that made the room appear larger than it actually was.

Hyun Wanner, one of the Kimchi Princess owners—who also happened to be on par with his DJs in terms of his enthusiasm for music—booked Soju Bar’s tasteful program until the club’s close. Like many small businesses in Berlin, it was forced to close and eventually became a part of a hotel in the same building. We asked Wanner to revisit some of Soju Bar’s most dedicated resident and regular guest DJs and pick the music that he associated with their nights.

Hunee: Shina Williams & His African Percussionists, “Agboju Logun” (Earthworks, 1984)

“This record turned into a huge Soju Bar hit. It was just the time when more and more DJs started to flavor their sets with African influences. I think it’s a trademark element of Hunee’s sound these days. Another regular Soju Bar DJ called Nomad, now of Africaine 808, went completely down that road. I love this record. I bought it years before Soju Bar, because my favorite Discogs dealer recommended it to me and offered me free shipping if I bought it. I was very pleased when Hunee played it the first time. I think he still plays it today.”

Lovefingers/Lexx: Carrie Cleveland, “Love Will Set You Free” (Cleve/Den, 1980)

“My girlfriend at the time was obsessed with this song. She knew that it was on Lovefingers’ blog and made him play it at least three times. I remember Andrew playing it two times in a row early in the morning and dancing on the floor with his eyes closed. Lexx had to do the same a couple of weeks later. This was one of these classic early morning magic moments. Sometimes there were only 15 people left in the place, but they had the time of their lives!”

Joel Martin (Quiet Village, Velvet Season & The Hearts of Gold): House Of House, “Rushing To Paradise (Walkin’ These Streets)” (Whatever We Want Records, 2009)

“When Soju Bar started, everything was really disco and balearic. Then, most DJs started to pick up housier vibes again. It was almost a bit like going through the history of dance music in one and a half years, and a few subsequent decades. This record contains all this history. It was first Soju Bar resident, DJ Filippo Moscatello, who introduced me to this record. I have funny memories of this track. For example, it was an incredibly hot night, and it was really empty, but a few people were dancing for hours and didn’t want to leave. Joel was the only DJ, and he’d already played six hours for the same 15 people.

When he was playing this track, a random, very young girl with a record bag came up and wanted to take over. She promised us to play the same kind of music: house! We were like, “Okay!” Well, she had her very own definition of house music, I reckon! Two records later, Joel and me were in a taxi home. She went on for a few more hours, and I have never seen her again.”

I will change. I promise.: Ideal, “Schöne Frau Mit Geld (Losoul Remix)” (Live At Robert Johnson, 2010)

“This was definitely the resident with the best name. I was promising this to myself pretty much every Monday morning! This party was hosted by our friend Alex van der Maarten and was musically on a slightly different trip, but it was always very successful and always busy. It had guest DJs like Nu and Lee Jones. This was one one of its signature tracks.”

JR Seaton (Call Super): Bunny Mack, “Let Me Love You” (Rokel, 1979)

Call Super—or JR Seaton, as he still called himself back then—played at Soju Bar many times. I think the first time he was invited by Headman, who did a monthly Relish Night at Soju Bar. Call Super finished the night together with Objekt, and they both blew my mind. They were playing very obscure electronic stuff and then broke it up with songs like this. 100 % early morning magic. Nobody cared which genre, which time or which part of the world the music was from. Everything melted into one amazing vibe.”

Druffalo Hit Squad: Nicolette, “Lotta Love” (Warner Bros., 1978)

“This was a huge Soju Bar anthem! The Druffalo Hit Squad‘s party Love Fools was the night where anything was possible. From pop to shock to classics—and not classics! Sometimes very ironic, sometimes iconic! Sometimes hard to follow, and sometimes pure magic. At the end of their nights there was a lot of love in the air indeed.”

Baby G: Jeremy Glenn, “Driving At Night” (We Play House, 2011)

Baby G is the most crazy Catalonian girl I’ve ever met. Great DJ. I really liked her mid-tempo contemporary house vibes. This was her stand-out track for me, even though she never played a bad record. I loved the whole crew around her, particularly Paramida and Katovl who later helped me with booking Soju Bar in its final year.”

Emil Doesn’t Drive: Sheryl Lee Ralph, “In The Evening” (The New York Music Company, 1984)

“Emil always was one of my favorite DJs. He was a real music lover and enthusiast. Every Emil Doesn’t Drive set was a trip. This was his classic peak-time record after a long build-up with weird cosmic and Italo stuff. I’m very happy to see this record has a huge renaissance now. Harvey even played it at Panorama Bar a few weeks back! Fantastic lyrics by the way, even though I only understood part of it when I heard it for the first time. But that was all the information I needed.”

JG Wilkes (Optimo): Todd Terje, “Inspector Norse” (Smalltown Supersound, 2012)

“Over dinner, Jonnie (JG Wilkes of Scottish DJ duo Optimo) asked me if I had heard the brand new Todd Terje record yet. He played it later that night. People freaked out, and a few weeks later it turned into one of the biggest dance records of that year. I guess Soju Bar was the perfect place for all the DJs who usually played to much bigger crowds to test new records. I could write a book about the weekends when Jonnie was in town, but I better keep it private!”

Daniel Wang: Donna McGhee, “Make It Last Forever” (Red Greg Records, 1978)

“I have to admit—I have no idea if Danny actually ever played this record on one of these incredible Wednesday nights when he was hosting his party Nightflight. It could have been one of his always-amazing guests, like Prosumer, Discodromo or Darshan Jesrani. But for me, it describes the vibe of these nights in a perfect way. All that passion, all that desire, all these smiling faces. I wish we could have made it last forever!”

Nathan Gregory Wilkins (Cowboy Rhythmbox): Cos Ber Zam, “Ne Noya (Daphni Mix)” (Jiaolong, 2011)

“Nathan plays an incredible range of music. I love having chats about music with him, because he doesn’t consider himself to be a digger. He doesn’t care where the music comes from as long as it’s good. And he’s the only reason why I’m still on Facebook. He’s the funniest person on the whole platform.”

Alex from Voices & Johnny Chingas: Henry Mancini And His Concert Orchestra, “African Symphony” (RCA Victor, 1975)

“This track is early morning magic taken to a new level! Those two always had a few amazing records in their bags and a lot of stories about the old acid house and DJ Harvey days. We became really good friends. Christian Pannenborg introduced us. He was hosting the Institute of Harmless Thinking party together with JM Moser, and they had great guests like Young Marco or Piers Harrison of Soft Rocks. Christian runs the Record Loft now.”

Hugo Capablanca: It’s A Fine Line, “Woman (A Makhnovshchina Repossession)” (History Clock, 2008)

“This is a great edit. Hugo played this when he was warming up for Nathan Gregory Wilkins on whose History Clock label it was released. It was the era of edits, everybody was releasing them. Not every edit was as good as this one, though. Sometimes I didn’t understand why some people had the arrogance to touch a classic and think they could turn it into something better.

I don’t know if edits made anything better, to be honest. I think the only justification for an edit is when the result is something completely new. The best Party with Hugo was the first anniversary of Soju Bar when he, Pavel Plastik and Baris K played together for the first time. Amazing set by the three of them. It sounded like they’d already been playing together for ages!”

Kalabrese: Hot Chocolate, “Every 1’s A Winner” (RAK, 1978)

Kalabrese was invited by Konstantin and Manu, who hosted the party Only A Fool Would Play. It had guests like DJ Supermarkt or Thomas Bullock. That night was all about soft rock, yacht rock and all sorts of cool mid-tempo and sometimes cheesy stuff. Anything was possible. He more or less came straight from a gig at Berghain to play at Soju Bar. This was his first record and he absolutely killed it. He also wasn’t afraid to play a few more hits like that.”

Soft Rocks: Idjut Boys, “One For Kenny (Extended LP Version)” (Smalltown Supersound, 2012)

“This was one of the few nights that was recorded. There is this amazing Soft Rocks live at Soju Bar mix on Soundcloud that shows the great quality of music that happened there. I wish we would have recorded more. That would have been quite some archive.”

 

The post 15 Leftfield House And Disco Anthems From Berlin’s Sadly Closed Soju Bar Club appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Roli brings classic Indian instruments to their Noise app through a joint project with A. R. Rahman

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Thu 31 May 2018 12:15 am

Roli’s Noise app has seen a constant flow of useful updates for musicians over the last few years. My favourite update was when Roli added overdub, which made the app so much more creatively interesting for me. But it isn’t just updates that have made their Noise app something to return to, it’s also the wide variety of content that Roli has brought to their app, and with this latest soundpack they’ve brought the sounds of India’s greatest classical instruments through a new pack called “Colours of India”, which is the result of a groundbreaking project sponsored by legendary composer A.R. Rahman and students at his KM Music Conservatory.

Instruments like the veena, nadaswaram, bansuri flute, and tabla drums will be available as digital samples for music makers to play in ROLI’s mobile and desktop applications. The samples recreate the deep, rich expression of these acoustic instruments, opening a path for India’s musical heritage to enter the world of electronic sound.

“I wanted to share these sounds through ROLI’s sound library because it will inspire new music,” said A.R. Rahman, the celebrated composer, at today’s premiere performance in Chennai of the first piece created with the soundpack. “I hope this soundpack inspires everyone to make great music and also introduces you to the magic of Indian sounds.”

“Colours of India” was created by students at KM Music Conservatory, the Chennai institution that Mr. Rahman founded to teach the next generation of Indian musicians. KMMC students recorded hundreds of hours of performances on instruments like the ancient jaltarang and the nadaswaram, a Tamil wind instrument that has fascinated jazz musicians worldwide.

The pack itself contains 10 sounds, “Colours of India” is available in ROLI’s NOISE app for iOS. For desktop users there are also Veena, jaltarang, bansuri flute, and nadaswaram sounds available in Equator, ROLI’s soft synth.

“Colours of India” is available to purchase in the NOISE Soundpack Store for $6.99 (450 rupees).

Roli’s Noise app is available for free on the app store:

The post Roli brings classic Indian instruments to their Noise app through a joint project with A. R. Rahman appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Free Delay Modulator AUv3 Anyone? DLYM is for you then

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Wed 30 May 2018 11:46 pm

Who doesn’t like free software? In the world of iOS music making things are rarely expensive, but these days not often free. However, that can’t be said of DLYM, which is a free delay modulator audio unit that’ll work in your iOS host of choice.

The app produces flanger and chorus style effects. The developer, Imaginando, is one you may have heard of before. They also brought us DRC – Polyphonic Synthesizer, and LK – for Ableton Live & Midi control, both of which are great apps.

Imaginando’s latest creation takes its inspiration from DRC’s chorus effect. The new app, DLYM, expands on this functionality, and makes it available for all DAW instruments, and what’s more, it’s for free. DLYM comes with over 20 presets/patches to get you started.

DLYM is free on the app store now

The post Free Delay Modulator AUv3 Anyone? DLYM is for you then appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

COACHELLA 2019 TICKETS AND DATES ANNOUNCED

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 30 May 2018 11:30 pm
Coachella 2019 is oh so on!

COACHELLA 2019 TICKETS AND DATES ANNOUNCED

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 30 May 2018 11:30 pm
Get all the details!

June Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – EEO, Translators, Political Rules and Earth Stations

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 30 May 2018 3:25 pm

For radio and television stations with 5 or more full-time employees located in Arizona, Idaho, Maryland, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia, June 1 brings the requirement that you upload to your online inspection file your Annual EEO Public Inspection File Report detailing your employment outreach efforts for job openings filled in the last year, as well as the supplemental efforts you have made to educate the community about broadcast employment or the training efforts undertaken to advance your employees skills. For TV stations that are part of Employment Units with five or more full-time employees and located in Arizona, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming, you also need to submit your EEO Form 397 Mid-Term Report. See our article here on the Mid-Term Report, and another here on an FCC proposal that could lead to the elimination of the filing of the form.

June 1 should also serve as a reminder to radio stations in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia that your license renewal will be filed a year from now, on or before June 1, 2019. So, if you have not done so already, you should be reviewing your online public inspection file to make sure that it is complete, and otherwise review your station operations in anticipation of that filing. We wrote about some of the issues of concern for the upcoming license renewal cycle in our article here. TV stations in those same states will start the TV renewal cycle two years from now.This month also brings to the end a number of filing windows. LPTV and TV translator stations displaced by the incentive auction have until June 1 to complete and file displacement applications, specifying a new channel for their post-repacking operations. See our articles here and here. AM stations that filed for a FM translator in the most recent window who ended up mutually exclusive with other applicants have until June 14 to file amendments to their applications to resolve the mutual exclusivity or otherwise reach a settlement, or they will end up in an auction at some point in the future. For more information, see this article. Such an auction will be held for translator applicants from the 2003 translator window that were not able to resolve their mutual exclusivity in a long-ago translator window – that auction to be held starting June 21. See this article.

June will also bring a hearing at the Federal Election Commission on the required sponsorship identification for online political ads. See our article here for more information on this FEC hearing and other activity to regulate online political advertising.

And broadcast stations using C Band earth stations to receive programming or for other uses should consider registering these dishes with the FCC, as the FCC is considering repurposing the band for other uses or allowing other wireless uses in the band used by these dishes. The FCC needs to know what users need protection or other accommodation in that band. While there is no requirement that receive-only dishes be registered, no protection will be afforded to those that do not register by July 18. See the FCC public notice on that issue here.

As always, there are plenty of other legal and regulatory issues that may affect broadcast stations – including political lowest unit rate windows in many states in anticipation of primary elections. So stay alert for those dates, watch alerts from broadcast associations, and consult your attorney to make sure that you stay on top of all of your regulatory obligations.

A life cycle for open modules, as Mutable Instruments joins VCV Rack

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 30 May 2018 11:58 am

The free and open VCV Rack software modular platform already is full of a rich selection of open source modules. Now, Rack users get first access to the newest Mutable Instruments modules – and your $20 even goes to charity.

Mutable Instruments is unique among modular makers partly in that its modules are open source – and partly in that they’re really exceptionally creative and sound amazing.

Mutable’s Olivier Gillet was an early adopter of the open source model for music hardware, (along with CDM and our 2010 MeeBlip), starting with the classic Shruthi-1 desktop module (2012). But it’s really been in modular that Mutable has taken off. Even as Eurorack has seen a glut of modules, Olivier’s creations – like Braids, the Macro Oscillator, Clouds, and others – have stood out. And the open source side of this has allowed creative mods, like the Commodore 64 speech synthesis firmware we saw recently.

But Rack, by providing an open software foundation to run modules on, has opened a new frontier for those same modules, even after they’re discontinued. Rack’s ecosystem is a mix of free and open modules and proprietary paid modules. Here, you get a combination of those two ideas.

The hardware.

The software. (Macro Oscillator 2, “Audible Instruments,” in VCV Rack.)

Mutable’s Plaits, a successor to the original multi-functional Braids oscillator, isn’t out yet. And its source will be delayed a bit after that. But for twenty bucks, you get both Plaits (dubbed Macro Oscillator 2 inside VCV) ahead of release, opening up a wonderful new source for pitched and percussion sounds. Most of your money even goes to charity. (Actually, I’m happy to support these developers, too, but sure!) These are two of the more versatile sound sources anywhere.

The idea is, would-be hardware purchasers get an advance test. And everyone gets a version they can run in software for convenience. Either way, all synth lovers win, pretty much. Synthtopia has a similar take:

Is This The Future Of Eurorack Modules?

Maybe, maybe not but — on another level, even if this is just the model for Mutable’s stuff, it’s already good news modular fans and VCV Rack users.

And let’s not forget what it all sounds like. Here’s a mesmerizing, tranquil sound creation by Leipzig-based artist Synthicat, showing off Plaits / Macro Oscillator 2:

Another bonus of VCV Rack support for studio work – you get multiple instances easily, without buying multiple modules. So I can imagine a lot of people using elaborate modular setups they could never afford in the studio, then buying a smaller Eurorack rig for live performance use, for example. Check out Synthicat’s music at his Bandcamp site:

https://synthikat.bandcamp.com/

You’ll find a bunch of sound models available, from more traditional FM and analog oscillations to granular to percussive to, indeed, some of that weird speech synthesis business we mentioned. You also get a new interface with more flexible control and CV modulation, unifying what are in fact many different models of sound production into a single, unified, musical interface.

Loads and loads of models. Pop them up by right-clicking, or check the different icons on the center of the module panel.

As for Plaits hardware, here’s some more beautiful music:

https://mutable-instruments.net/modules/plaits/

The official announcement:

When Mutable Instruments releases a new Eurorack module, its source code is kept closed to limit the proliferation of opportunistic “DIY” clones at a time when there is a lot of demand for the module and to avoid exposing dealers to canceled pre-orders. After several months, a second production run is finished and the source code is released.

In a collaboration between VCV and Mutable Instruments, we allow you to test these new modules before their source code is publicly available with the “Audible Instruments Preview” plugin.

We don’t intend to profit from this collaboration. Instead, 80% of sales are donated to the Direct Relief (https://www.directrelief.org/) Humanitarian Medical Aid charity organization. The price exists to limit widespread distribution until each module is mature enough to be merged into Audible Instruments.

I have no doubt this will get hardware people hooked on the software, software people hooked on the hardware, and everybody synth-y and happy.

Note from VCV deveoper Andrew Belt [Facebook VCV Rack Group]

https://mutable-instruments.net/modules/plaits/

It seems more ports/previews may be coming, too, even just in the Audible Instruments preview purchase.

That’s not the only Rack news, either. VCV also have a powerful patchable parametric EQ called Parametra:

It’s $30 – so another proprietary offering that then supports development of the Rack platform.

https://vcvrack.com/Parametra.html

The post A life cycle for open modules, as Mutable Instruments joins VCV Rack appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

AudioKit Synth One is coming, the largest open source music project in iOS history

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 29 May 2018 7:49 pm

This is going to be a really big deal. AudioKit Synth One is coming soon from the people who brought you FM Player: Classic DX Synths. If you don’t know who I’m talking about, AudioKit Pro, is an open source framework for building iOS synth and audio applications. It’s actually pretty amazing and totally powered by passionate and talented individuals who want to make incredible apps. AudioKit doesn’t just power iOS apps though, it can be used for macOS and watchOS apps too, so it’s a pretty versatile framework.

It’s worth taking a look at the many apps that are powered by AudioKit. You’ll be surprised by the number and range of apps that make use of the framework, and of course they’ve made their own creations too.

Their latest app has been some two years in the making and is the first free and completely open source synth on iOS. That in itself is a very impressive statement. However, when you look at the app and the functionality that’s packed into it, you’re going to be even more impressed.

Here’s what you can expect:

  • Hybrid Analog/FM Poly Synthesizer
  • Over 200+ Presets crafted by famous sound designers
  • Audiobus 3 & Inter-app Audio (IAA)
  • Five Oscillators (2 DCO, FM, Sub, Noise)
  • 2 Assignable LFOs with dozens of routing possibilities
  • 100+ Alternative Scales & Tunings
  • Vintage-Style 16-Step Sequencer
  • Classic poly arpeggiator
  • MIDI in (Control with a MIDI Keyboard or DAW)
  • Touchable ADSR Envelopes for Amp & Filter
  • FM Oscillator w/ Mod
  • Dedicated Sine/Square -12/24 Sub Osc
  • 4-Pole Vintage Low-Pass Filter
  • High-Pass/Band Pass Filters
  • Mono portamento & legato
  • Beautiful Sean Costello Reverb
  • Multi-tap (ping-pong) delay
  • TouchPads
  • Preset Import/Export & More…
  • MIDI Learn on all knobs, MIDI Bank/Patch & Sustain Pedal support
  • Full Source code included

It’s an impressive list, and it’s going to be an impressive synth. What’s more even after they’ve delivered version 1 they’ve got a bunch of updates already in the pipeline to make it better still.

Today you can read about AudioKit Synth One here, and sign up at AudioKit. Tomorrow there’ll be more news, and you can expect the app to land at an app store new you in around 2-3 weeks. Personally, I can’t wait. It’s a big step forward for mobile music, for the community, and for AudioKit Pro.

If you really can’t wait that long, you can always grab their current app FM Player to give you a feel for what’s coming, and of course, you can sign up to get email news about the app when it lands. Expect to find it here too when it arrives.

For now, check the video, and enjoy.

The post AudioKit Synth One is coming, the largest open source music project in iOS history appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FCC Extends Dates by Which TV Broadcasters Must Convert Non-Textual Emergency Information to Audio on SAP Channel

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 29 May 2018 5:09 pm

In an Order released Friday, The FCC gave TV broadcasters five more years to convert non-textual emergency information delivered to audiences outside of news programs into speech that is broadcast on station’s Secondary Audio Programming (“SAP”) channels, usually used for Spanish and other non-English translations of television programs. Broadcasters, as we have written before (see our articles here, here and here) are already required to take textual information (like textual crawls) containing emergency information that is broadcast outside of news programming and to provide those messages in audio on SAP channels so that visually impaired viewers can get the emergency information. The blind and others with visual impairments are notified of the emergency information that is contained in a crawl by the audible tones that stations air when they are providing such information.

While the textual information can be converted to speech to be broadcast on the SAP channels though automated means, the NAB, the American Council of the Blind, and the American Foundation for the Blind submitted a request for a further waiver of the rules that would otherwise require that non-textual information like weather maps be converted into speech, noting that none of these organizations could find any source for an accurate means to make that conversion automatically. See our article here on the waiver request. The costs and potential inaccuracies of station employees trying to provide such descriptions live at a station precluded live description from being a viable solution. Thus, the FCC gave the parties five years to develop an automated system to provide such descriptions.

The NAB will need to report to the FCC on its progress at the midway point of this 5 year waiver period. The FCC also urged stations to do their best to insure that the information shown on maps and other non-textual emergency information be conveyed in textual alerts, so that the public can receive information about emergency situations. In the same order, the FCC granted a permanent waiver of this requirement to analog-only cable systems that lack the equipment to pass through the audio from such alerts.

Inside the livecoding algorave movement, and what it says about music

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 29 May 2018 2:30 pm

Using code for live music has gone from geeky fringe to underground revolution, offering a fresh approach to music and pattern, even for first-time coders. Alex McLean is one of the people at the center of this medium’s growth.

“Code” in this environment isn’t just about software language. The free, open source tool Alex McLean created, TidalCycles, found its original inspiration in research into analyzing Indian tabla rhythms. These environments are very much about getting closer to the essence of what makes music tick – the underlying technology of musical culture.

https://tidalcycles.org/ (powered by SuperCollider)

With Alex set to play and teach this weekend in Berlin, it seemed the perfect time to get his personal and musical story, and to have him take us on a tour of live coding’s latest frontiers. Alex is a laptop musician and developer, as well as a social organizer for a movement that’s spreading these tools worldwide. Johnny Appleseed style, Alex and others are planting seeds and building up a network of people who share knowledge and support one another. From my vantage point, the live coding scene represents a kind of free, open, collective model for supporting musical practice and culture, in contrast to the generally competitive dominant paradigm.

And oh yeah – that does include the “algorave,” a format Alex has promoted. Step into these marathon live code jams, and you may be surprised – this is danceable stuff, often with shoe-smoldering high tempos.

But if you only saw the novelty of people typing code on laptops to produce sound, you might miss the musical explorations it’s enabling. Perhaps because TidalCycles’ syntax lets you directly express loops and rhythmic ideas from a blank slate, without wrestling with all the chrome and complexity of typical musical software, it’s empowering some very creative work. For instance, I’ve had the fortune to get to know Miri Kat, a London-based artist using TidalCycles in her music (as well as making live algorave visuals). Late last year, through the CDM music label side project Establishment Records, we released her first EP (with generative visuals provided by Max/MSP/Jitter). I’m biased, of course, but to me, Miri’s work has sophistication in texture and pattern. So you don’t really need to know that live coding was used in its production – but then once you do know, it’s worth finding out how the tool represents musical ideas, and how the person who designed the tool thinks about those topics.

If you’re in Berlin, Alex joins a diverse live lineup Saturday at an event we’re organizing with Modular+ Space:

Encoded LIVE

And Alex will offer a workshop in TidalCycles and musical pattern Saturday afternoon. There are still some (limited) spots available if you act quickly.

Learn music patterning in TidalCycles, a free livecoding tool

Register for the workshop [30EUR incl. VAT]

We’re walking here at the edge between music theory and interface design, code and musical material, artist and organizer, musician and developer. So I was eager to ask Alex about how those pieces interlock – and how he manages his various roles and time.

Live coding really does involve dark rooms and screens full of code, like hacker representations in scifi and TV. Alex McLean, live; photo: Vitalija Glovackyte.

First, before we get into algorithmic music or livecoding, what was your entry into music, as far as training? What was your earliest musical experience?

I don’t have any formal musical training. I tried to play the guitar when I was young, but got nowhere. I just got ‘stuck’ playing the same things over and over (mainly “Wild Thing” by the Troggs). I’m a 70s child, so grew up during the home computer revolution in the 80s, but couldn’t buy a decent [computer] myself. But for some unknown reason, one day, our provincial state school received some great synths, including a Yamaha DX7, drum machine, and four-track recorder. Our music teacher let us play on them during lunchtimes, and so instead of going outside, we more or less recreated “Blue Monday” ever day.

You’ve done just a massive amount of event organization – that 100+ event count in your bio is real, yes? How do you keep all of that together in your head, in terms of organizing and logistics? How do you have any time for music making on top of everything else you do?

Yep – it’s an addiction, really. As well as dozens of algoraves, I’ve organized around 100 Dorkbot electronic art events, loads of ‘placard’ headphone parties, started two international conferences (ICLC on live coding and ICLI on live interfaces) and am now planning the third edition of the Festival of Algorithmic and Mechanical Movement in Sheffield. I do it mainly by collaborating with great people, and also by sending and receiving a lot of emails. It’s a great thing, imagining a weird event, talking to some people, and then a few months down the line, it’s happening. Usually, at that point, I’ve decided never to do another event ever again — but a few weeks later, a new idea pops up.

Really, though, it’s out of necessity. Interesting things happen in the gaps between communities, and the best way of making that happen is by making an event and forming a new community around it. It’s also really part of my music-making. You can’t really separate music from community.

On that note, actually, do you find you have to set aside some time that’s just for being a musician again?

Not generally, because I rarely record anything or make ‘tracks’ — just mainly play improvised, broken techno, live. So I just wait until someone invites me to play somewhere and I go and do it. That said, I do have a crowdfunded album project that is now about two years overdue. I keep setting time aside for that, but then find a new idea to explore for it. I’ve also formed a new duo (Class Compliant Audio Interfaces) with my friend Damu, and we are practicing regularly; that’s going well.

Tell us a little bit about TidalCycles. There was a connection to Indian classical rhythm in the way you conceived this software, right? How did you get from there to building a live coding environment?

Yes, that’s right. My first live coding environment was written in Perl, but it was frustratingly slow to work with. Then I came across BP2 – the second version of Bernard Bel’s “Bol Processor”, originally made for transcribing Indian tabla rhythms. I transferred the syntax into Haskell for a project I was doing for my Masters degree at Goldsmiths, around generating rhythmic continuations. A lot of Bernard’s ideas, and the reading I did around musical time in Indian classical music, still form the basis of the mini-language inside Tidal for describing polyrhythmic sequences, as well as Tidal’s conception of cyclic time.

Bol Processor 2 (BP2) at SourceForge

It strikes me that the essence of this is about pattern and rhythm. Did you try to think consciously in those musical terms when designing the tool?

Yes that was my motivation – to make a language for musical pattern. A lot already existed that I learned from, e.g. in SuperCollider, HMSL, Common Music, and in the writings of Laurie Spiegel. But although I put the code online for the first few years, I don’t think anyone else tried to use it. It was just for me, to make my own music as part of our band Slub.

Now, having edited the Oxford Guide, where would you position TidalCycles relative to other livecoding tools? What other tools should people be aware of – realizing there are a lot of these – on desktop or on browser?

Oh.. There’s absolutely loads of great stuff! There’s a lot to discover, and it’s almost all free/open source. Here’s the exhaustive list:

https://github.com/toplap/awesome-livecoding/blob/master/README.md

I’m particularly excited by FoxDot and Gibber taking things to the next level. Of course you can also livecode visuals, and Hydra [by Olivia Jack] is the new + exciting thing on the scene there. Both Gibber and Hydra run in the browser, and Foxdot is a fairly easy cross-platform download..

Is there anything to be said about the relationship between live textual coding and live visual/dataflow environments? (I was going to say Pure Data as an example.)

I don’t see any difference, really; a Pd patch has plenty of text in it, it’s just that the syntax comes from connecting the words together instead of arranging them next to each other. In fact, on one level, TidalCycles is a kind of pure, functional approach to dataflow. You can see this in the experimental visual frontend I made for it:

https://slab.org/colourful-texture/

We’ll give you a fresh group of people Saturday in Berlin to teach the software. Where do you start in a workshop, in terms of how to present it – once installation and such is done, that is?

I like to get people to think about what a pattern really is. In computer music, we too often think of patterns in terms of straight sequences or piano rolls. But patterns are a lot more than that — it’s a way of making, really. So I get people to think about patterns in terms of repetitions, symmetries, and reflections on multiple levels, and (I think) most importantly interference patterns which often create fascinating complexities from simple ingredients. Then of course there’s deviation from a pattern, the random numbers which are an important (if perhaps massively overblown) aspect of algorithmic composition.

This stuff it seems is really taking off. What can you say about the > state of the larger livecoding or live laptop scene? Is there something giving it some new velocity?

I think it’s been a slow burner, but has grown into a global network of local communities. A vibrant scene grew in Mexico City and is spreading around South America. There’s an increasingly active scene in Tokyo, too. It really comes down to local organizers deciding to dedicate their spare time to running workshops and putting on shows.

It’s sort of funny to me in a way that there’s a renewed interest in laptop performance just as many people are very vocally abandoning laptops for, say, Eurorack modular. Are these opposed forces? Or are we just getting to the point where people are getting more interested in live performance and improvisation? Is it about trying all sorts of interfaces to connect their thoughts to what they’re playing?

Yes, I think it’s all connected — people wanting to open up boxes and work with what’s inside, work with systems as material. I see the same motivation behind wiring and re-wiring a modular synthesizer and modifying live code while it runs.

Plus, of course, some people do both. There are people connecting Tidal and other live coding systems to modular synths.

Alex live, as Yaxu.

You’re going to play as a solo artist (Yaxu) – what’s that music about for you? There are some musical ideas that are separate from the tool, or would you say the tool is part of how you express that musical vision?

Well, I often degenerate into making deconstructed gabber whatever I do. But I guess when I perform solo, I try to make it about learning something new with Tidal – work it into new territory, perhaps by using a new function I’ve added or trying out a new combination of functions. That’s what makes it exciting for me and, hopefully, the audience. I don’t like the idea of musical vision, though, because I think live coding (and indeed music in general) isn’t at all about expressing fully conceived musical ideas in an efficient manner, but starting with something and seeing where it takes you. Working with pattern is great for this, because it’s so full of surprises.

Is there ever tension between working on building tools and communities, and working on your own music, or how did you harmonize them?

Making languages for music leads to making music, as does making parties, so it all fits together nicely. If I’m honest, it’s a bit concerning when other people make fantastic music with Tidal, but that just encourages me to push my own music forward. The idea of an individual voice in music is probably a fairly recent thing. I like the folk music model where people borrow tunes from each other all the time. Free/open source music fits into that nicely.

Yeah, I think in Western music history we can look to the Middle Ages for that individualist model – though then, too, that era was definitely into open source. Cantus firmus on GitHub, anyone?

So, looking beyond you — all these people who have picked up TidalCycles and gone and made their own expression, in their own art and teaching. Who are some of the people you’d point to who represent the range of what’s happened in the livecoding scene?

Oh gosh! In terms of Tidal people in particular:

I love Scotts-Berliner Calum Gunn’s stuff, both with and without Tidal:

http://www.calumgunn.com/

The same with Lucy Cheesman aka Heavy Lifting in Sheffield, she does top-notch Tidal stuff. We had a really fun collaboration recently, but she also performs with [live coding tool] Foxdot:

https://heavy-lifting.github.io/

Kindohm over in Minnesota makes totally amazing music too, and has been integral to the community from the start:

https://kindohm.bandcamp.com/

Alexandra Cardenas, I guess a Columbian-Mexican-Berliner, is another huge force for good in the community, currently spreading Tidal on tour across South America, and with every performance different and inspiring.

http://cargocollective.com/tiemposdelruido

I’ve really enjoyed following the development of audiovisual live coding in Japan e.g. Atsushi Tadokoro — looking forward to hosting an exchange with him + others soon!

Malitzin Cortes (CNDSD)’s Tidal experiments are also pushing Tidal into new ground, and her collaborations with visual artist Ivan Abreu
are something else:

http://blog.tidalcycles.org/cndsd/

Rodrigo Velasco aka Yecto from Mexico City, just love his inspired a/v work + experimental events:

Oh, this is so hard, to leave people out, but I guess I’d pick those out as being particularly active in growing the community in their different ways, as well as developing their own strong sound and approach. I’ll probably kick myself for forgetting someone.

Music from Yaxu (Alex)

Yaxu (audio) + Miri Kat (video) live at algorave sheffield 01/09/17

Algorave generation – we love repetition. 😉

Collaborating with Damu, as CCAI:

This recent stream to Algorave Moscow gives you a sense of how Alex builds up his tracks:

And Alex has put out an EP, on Computer Club:

And yes, there is still that massively overdue crowdfund project to do a full-length. Now you can see why the guy is busy, though, for sure.

Come join us in Berlin if you can:

Workshop

Concert/party

The post Inside the livecoding algorave movement, and what it says about music appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Copy and Past(e)

Delivered... norient | Scene | Tue 29 May 2018 6:00 am

Recycling footage has long been a common practice in music videos. Due to the mass availability of footage online, it has become even more popular. By freeing existing images from their original temporality and intended purpose and setting them to music, artists transform their meaning and generate an emotional experience of the past. From the Norient book Seismographic Sounds (see and order here)

Publicity Still from East of Borneo (Still © by Warner Brothers, 1931).

In 1936, American artist Joseph Cornell took select images from a discarded print of the Universal film East of Borneo (1931), removed the original dialogue and music, and played records alongside the images. The exact soundtrack Cornell chose in 1936 is unknown. However, for the 1963 screening, the soundtrack for the film, which he called Rose Hobart after East of Borneo’s starring actress, consisted of two songs from Nestor Amaral’s 1957 album Holiday in Brazil. This album has become the film’s de facto soundtrack. Amaral’s music emphasizes the dreamlike qualities of East of Borneo already foregrounded by Cornell’s reediting of the images. Indeed, as Rose Hobart may have first revealed, placing a beat or melody behind found imagery often allows something latent in those images to emerge, shifting our attention so that we remark upon details we might have otherwise missed.

In his foundational 1993 book on the topic of found footage, Recycled Images: The Art and Politics of Found Footage Films, film scholar William C. Wees criticized the use of found footage in Michael Jackson’s music video «The Man in the Mirror» (1987) for producing superficial, postmodern effects. He writes, «The shot of a nuclear explosion in Michael Jackson’s music video is simply one image in a stream of recycled images presented with little, if any, concern for their historical specificity—let alone logical or even chronological connection […]. The object or event in history has been superseded by […] simulacra, by representations of other representations produced and preserved by the mass media.»

While Wees makes a valid critique, I would argue that not all music videos that incorporate found footage function this way. Indeed, music videos may produce a variety of provocative instances of what I call the archive effect. The archive effect is derived from the viewer’s recognition that certain footage within a film or video derives from both another time and another intention. We perceive a temporal disparity between different pieces of footage within the film: a sense of a now of the contemporary footage, sound, and/or editing and a then of the appropriated footage. At the same time, we also experience an intentional disparity, a perception that certain footage originally served one purpose but is now being reused for a new and different purpose.

The Affective Experience of History

In Norient’s book and exhibition Seismographic Sounds — Visions of a New World, several artists combine their music (and sometimes original footage) with found materials to striking results. Indeed, beyond the archive effect, which derives simply from our recognition of found images as such, these videos may also engender in the viewer a powerful instance of what I refer to as the archive affect. In other words, the combination of found images with music tends to elevate and foreground the emotional content of such images. The archive affect may take the form of nostalgia based on our experience of temporal disparity because it emphasizes the pastness of certain images and/or sounds and evokes their lost historical contexts. Meanwhile, our experience of intentional disparity may generate humor or discomfort, among other sensations.

In the video for Gato Diablo’s «Nunca Tendremos Mar», for instance, when clips from old Bolivian films including Ukamau (1966) and The Blood of the Condor (1969) are cut together with similarly dated monster footage from the Hollywood B-movie Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954), we may first experience nostalgia for these traces of the cinematic past, scratched and degraded by age and format. As we recognize the false continuity established by the editing, we may be amused by the clever way in which the scaly monster is made to look—almost but not quite—like it is attacking a young girl. Finally, we may also experience disquiet as the geopolitical implications of a Hollywood monster murdering a Bolivian girl become apparent. Gato Diablo’s music underscores each of these affective engagements while allowing the disparate sources to coalesce into a newly invented narrative.

A New Meaning for Old Sources

In Soap & Skin’s «Sugarbread» video, a slew of upsetting and unnerving images, unmoored from any narrative context, attack us at a visceral level. Documentary images of an eyeball being extracted from a human face, several kneeling men being shot in the head, crash test dummies burning, and a bridge exploding combine with oneiric images from fiction films such as Dr. Mabuse the Gambler (1922), Metropolis (1927), and Simon of the Desert (1965), among others. Although the images derive from incredibly varied sources, themes of bodily distortion and violent action are unified and intensified by the brooding and sometimes cacophonous music and the repeated lyric, «Try to break one’s heart in perpetuity.» Meanwhile, Silvana Imam’s «I.M.A.M (jj Remix)», images from recent political events, accompanied by Imam’s political lyrics, transform protest footage from simple documentation of an event to an uplifting celebration. Indeed, such news footage, which may be viewed as banal within the context of a conventional news broadcast is reinvigorated as it is accompanied by Silvana Imam’s anthem to diversity and freedom.

William C. Wees may be correct in suggesting that, by eliminating contextual sounds from found images, music may serve to elide differences between sources and establish a false equivalence between them, obscuring the specificities of history. However, what is gained is a range of affective engagements with found images, an embodied response generated by the music that accompanies them. In the videos of Gato Diablo, Soap&Skin, Silvana Imam, and other artists included in Seismographic Sounds—Visions of a New World, found footage may be partially stripped of its original meanings, but it also accrues new and compelling resonances. Moreover, as attested to by online comment threads in which viewers collectively attempt to identify each image, the presence of found images in music videos often sparks the desire to know more about these images, which might otherwise have been forgotten or ignored. In short, such videos encourage us not precisely to know but rather to feel the presence of history.

The text was published first in the second Norient book Seismographic Sounds. Click on the image to know more.

Read More on Norient

> Heinrich Deisl: «Sugarbread and Whip»
> Eduardo Navas: «Regenerative Culture (Pt. 1/5)»
> Thomas Burkhalter: «Playing with the Dustbin of History»

A new, powerful synth finds its soul in a cheap plastic FM past

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 28 May 2018 11:38 pm

Imagine starting with a painstaking emulation of the lofi sound of instruments like Yamaha’s SHS-10 keytar – but then modulating those quirks in powerful ways. Now you’re getting the mission of the new plug-in from Plogue – PortaFM.

If you lived through the mid-80s – or inherited (or coveted) one of the instruments of the time – you may already know the peculiar sound of Yamaha’s FM PortaSound keyboards. Of course, what was once considered perhaps low quality might seem to our ears now as something else: a unique, complex timbre with interesting, edgy nonlinearities.

And as musical tastes have gradually accommodated a wider range of timbres, recreating such things isn’t necessarily about nostalgia. In a sea of music, people are looking for sounds with edge.

So, with that in mind, meet the OPLL – aka the YM2413 chip core. Tasked with recreating Yamaha’s patented Frequency Modulation (FM) synthesis, the technique first pioneered by John Chowning in the 60s, that chip produced a sound that was different than the best-known Yamaha, the DX7. So while the instruments looked cheesy – and provided the user with little control over sounds apart from calling up presets – they had at their heart a chip capable of creating sounds that may be weirdly more relevant today than when these tools were on the market.

This 1983 ad will give you a sense of where Yamaha positioned its PortaSound line:

But here, we’re talking models like the more advanced Yamaha SHS-10 “Sholky” keytar [1987], plus keyboards like the PSS-140 and PSS-270 [1986].

Mid 80s chic. But don’t call it a keytar – for Japanese accuracy, call it “Sholky.”

Montreal-based developer Plogue, for their part, have decided not to hide that power from the user. Apart from spending loads of time accurately modeling the chip, they’ve exposed all the parameters of the synthesis engine and drum sounds. (There are still some cues from the originals – note the polygons representing the drum pads, borrowed from the original PSR keyboards, but looking way more futuristic here.)

The work they’ve done on modeling pays off, too. Even just dialing through the presets, you’ll find loads of patches that sound simply alive. It’s not just about being lo-fi; the peculiarities of this particular FM chip give a weirdly acoustic – if alien – quality to some of the sounds. Instead of trying to smooth the edges of FM synthesis, you get more of that unpredictability in ways that can become surprisingly musical.

Transposed from the cheesy toy shells of Yamaha’s original products, you might easily confuse this for some new instrument. But to get there, Plogue were in fact obsessive about reproducing what had been consigned to yard sales and thrift stores. In a video premiering exclusively on CDM, Plogue’s David Viens compares the recreation to the original and explains the emulation.

Yes, kids, now you get to explore the joys of the time-division multiplexed 9-bit DAC on your powerful PC or Mac. Because 9-bit is the future?

The one and only Cuckoo also has visited this new Plogue creation:

I’ve only had the plug-in to play with for a short while, but there’s plenty to enjoy here. Deep under the hood, you can obsess about tiny variations in modeling, but just as fun is playing those lo-fi drum pads or messing about with playing different sounds.

Directly from the main screen, you can get hands on with the FM synthesis approach and percussion.

Mid 80s chic. But don’t call it a keytar – for Japanese accuracy, call it “Sholky.”

Programmers will find plenty of sophisticated options – for instance, you can automate sequences of parameters of your choice. But anyone will find the depth interesting. For instance, layering the percussion atop the FM sounds, under the ‘play’ tab, works exceptionally well.

Stacking percussion on top of your sounds is like adding a delicious, buttery layer of icing. Seriously, I about licked my screen.

You’ll find a range of effects, too:

Plogue are planning more instruments in the chipsynth series, as their models continue to improve and as they collect more data.

But you could argue this is a new direction – even relative to reboots like Roland’s new TR machines taking on the TR-808 and 909. Here, obsessive modeling of digital instruments is meant to create something both historically accurate and simultaneously new. To get topical, it’s the synth equivalent of Donald Glover’s Lando.

Okay, I’m not going to stretch that any further. i will say – PortaFM, you look absolutely beautiful. You truly belong here with us among the clouds.

More:

https://plogue.com/products/chipsynth-portafm.html

https://plogue.com/

The post A new, powerful synth finds its soul in a cheap plastic FM past appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme