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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » May » 17


Stereo Modulator is a new AUv3 effect converting mono sound to stereo

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Thu 17 May 2018 11:07 pm

You can’t have enough audio units right? Or at least it certainly seems that way these days. Now there’s a new AUv3, Stereo Modulator is an effect that converts mono sound into stereo sound, with an adjustable width and also optional stereo modulation.

The app works by using a bank of randomised stereo de-correlators that apply micro-delays into the sound and also introduce random differences between the spectrums of the left and the right audio channels. In its output we hear a natural sense of space that is not present in the original mono recording. It’s similar to the sound space one gets from using a stereo reverb plugin except that it is tight and clear, without any feeling of echo.

It can operate either as a static effect or it can be gently modulated by a low-frequency oscillator. The modulation is best compared to the sound you might get from using a Leslie speaker, except that there’s no impact to the pitch, so the output remains focused and tuning is not compromised, which is a big plus in my book.

This effect can be especially useful for mixing electric guitars together with vocals. Using Stereo Modulator on the guitars, we can push them out to the sides, creating a space in the centre for the vocal to cut through, without needing to reduce the volume of the guitars.

Stereo Modulator is available on the app store now and costs $4.99

The post Stereo Modulator is a new AUv3 effect converting mono sound to stereo appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Touché, adding expression to synths – just in time for Moogfest

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 17 May 2018 5:54 pm

After years of somewhat similar wheels and pads and keys that wiggle, we’re finally seeing the ability to get physically expressive with sound in new ways. The Expression E Touché is one of the most compelling cases of that – but to understand, you have to watch, and listen.

So the French company and its fearless young leader Arthur Bouflet have cleverly taken Moogfest as a chance to do just that.

You’ll spot the wooden paddle-looking device beneath Arthur’s hand. It’s something that looks simultaneously vintage and historical and futuristic – a design object whose origin and time can’t quite be placed. And your first reaction, probably, is some skepticism – until you watch just how sensitive and intuitively gestural it is. You may or may not be taken with Arthur’s musical sensibilities – hey, I find it rather cheery and groovy, myself – but pay close attention to the gestures that are possible with it, and I think you’ll be impressed.

There’s more than one connection here to Moogfest, the festival-cum-technology meetup coming to North Carolina this week. There’s the custom, limited edition overlay for festival goers, yes, and the fact that Expressive E are going to the festival themselves. But the company have also made great effort to make custom presets for loads of gear, Moog’s equipment included. So that includes apps (Moog Model D for iOS), and hardware (DFAM, Subsequent 37, just to name two in the video).

It’d be hard to demo an expression or sustain pedal, but there’s no need. And it’s easy enough to map those two inputs to any synth. Open-ended, gestural expression is something else – there’s some prep work involved. Hats off, then, to Expressive E for both making an exhaustive library of presets and producing lovely-looking video demos to show why this all matters. (They’ve even mapped our MeeBlip synth.)

With USB, CV, and, MIDI connections, there are all sorts of possibilities for connecting to instruments – hardware and software, digital and analog. And all of these connect to the high-resolution sensing data from the Touché.

I’ll do a full review of this hardware soon, with some advice for DIYers and musicians. But in the meanwhile, these videos really get the point across.

In the age of MIDI Polyphonic Expression, you’ll see a lot of new controllers adding dimension to the inputs they read. And that makes it clearer than ever that part of what was holding back more expressive electronic musicianship was simply the common standard to describe a wider range of human performance.

But this particular hardware is special, in that it suddenly opens up sound where it had once been static. Uh… well, the name fits. Touché.

Let’s watch some more, featuring Dave Smith and Ableton and Mutable and Novation and more:

The post The Touché, adding expression to synths – just in time for Moogfest appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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