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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » May » 20


FAC Envolver brings envelope following to iOS AUv3 hosts

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 10:54 pm

Mr Corvest has become a somewhat prolific developer in the iOS world since he first appeared. His latest creation is FAC Envolver.

The app is an envelope follower, this implies that it tracks the contour of the input signal and builds a corresponding envelope. Think of the envelope as the outline of the graphical representation of a rectified version of your input signal. By its very essence, it’s exactly what you get. But the process does not stop there and gives you the ability to modify the shape according to a set of provided parameters.

So it’s possible to define the rise and fall time as well as the depth of the envelope or also to invert it. Those parameters are the key to ensure the flexibility of the effect, and to meet the goal you are looking for.

The previous lines are more a general presentation of what an envelope follower does, but the particularity of FAC Envolver, which makes it an outstanding and versatile tool, is that it delivers the envelope via MIDI control change messages or commonly referred to as CC.

The key is to map the CC number parameter to the volume, cutoff, resonance control of your synthesizer or effect units. By doing so you will get instant additional hands to tweak your parameters automatically depending on what you are currently playing.

The internal signal path is built around two independant channels, having one envelope circuit detection per input signal. So the left input signal is wired to the envelope one, and the right input signal is wired to the envelope two.

FAC Envolver will breathe life into your sound, providing interesting natural modulation that will always be different by nature. Following the diagram below, the sound flows from the left to right or from the input to the output.

Input

  • Gain (up to 15db) Use it carefully
  • Audio output activated or mute
  • Monoize input signal for detection
  • [ON] Mono for each env
  • [OFF] Left for first env and Right for second env

Output envelope 1 (L) and 2 (R)

  • Mute – left buttons (|1/ or |2/) are toggleable (gray muted/yellow activated)
  • Rise – defines the time the envelope takes to rise. Set to minimum to catch the transient.
  • Fall – defines the time the envelope takes to fall. Set to maximum for more slew between peaks
  • Depth – provides attenuation or amplification of the envelope
  • Multi-waveform graph – envelope contour layered over input signal. Touch the graph to freeze the display temporarily.
  • Invert – invert the envelope
  • CC# – number of the control change messages where the envelope is sent (channel 1). Only one CC can be used at time per output.

FAC Envolver costs $6.99 on the app store now

The post FAC Envolver brings envelope following to iOS AUv3 hosts appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Bram Bos brings their latest iOS AUv3 FX, Perforator, for creating rhythmic patterns from pads, strings, and drones

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 4:01 pm

Bram Bos brings out yet another innovative AUv3 effect to put into your host. Perforator lets you add rhythm to simple sustained sounds, which is something that I’ve been hoping would arrive on the iOS scene for a while now.

The app is a rhythmic gating audio effect that will creatively snip, cut, gap and filter incoming audio to create rhythmic patterns out of your pads, strings, drones or any other audio stream you decide to feed through it.

By tuning the slice envelopes you can create anything from classic staccato “trance gate” sounds to emulations of sloppy pumping sidechain compression.

Two gating mechanisms can be dialled in: an AMP EG gate (the traditional way of gating) and a 12dB/Oct lowpass filter which will rapidly carve away high frequencies from your sound to effectively silence them.

  • AUv3 Audio Effect, works in all AU compatible hosts
  • automatically syncs with your project’s tempo
  • edit Left an Right channel independently
  • built-in preset manager with a ton of factory presets
  • all AU Parameters exposed for host automation
  • Universal: works on iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch
  • Bonus Feature: AU MIDI output*

Perforator requires iOS10 (iPad 4, iPhone 5S, iPod 6G and higher) and an AU compatible host app. Perforator has standalone functionality with basic IAA and Audiobus 3 support for demonstration purposes only. Using the AUv3 plugin is recommended.

* AU MIDI: both envelopes (L+R) can send their values out as MIDI CC messages to mimic ‘parameter lock’ messages in other plugins/apps. Note: this feature requires iOS11+ and a host compatible with AU MIDI from effects.

Perforator costs just $3.99 on the app store now

The post Bram Bos brings their latest iOS AUv3 FX, Perforator, for creating rhythmic patterns from pads, strings, and drones appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Chvrches: ‘It only takes two seconds to say: I don’t agree with white supremacy’

Delivered... Kate Mossman | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 9:00 am

The Glaswegian synth-pop trio rose to fame on the back of relentless touring, even as frontwoman Lauren Mayberry fended off online abuse. Their new album finds them aiming for the top

Lauren Mayberry has two boiled eggs waiting for her at home. Chvrches are about to go on tour for a year and a half, and she wants the protein. When I first met the band, in a Thistle hotel in east London in 2012, Mayberry was strengthening her diaphragm for the demands of singing live. On the back of their debut album, they played 365 dates in two years and the diaphragm worked out fine.

Chvrches could not have known, sitting in that unremarkable hotel, what direction their rise to fame would take. Mayberry is a frontwoman developing in plain sight, through a well-publicised struggle with particularly vicious internet trolls to where she is now: living in New York and making records with wizard producer Greg Kurstin. There have been some impressive associations along the way: being interviewed by Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney; campaigning for girls’ empowerment with Amy Poehler; support slots for Depeche Mode. She is coming to terms with the fact that if you are famous, you will always be someone’s projection. “I definitely fall into one of two categories,” she says brightly, sucking an ice tea. “Diminutive, wet-blanket snowflake or angry feminist bitch.”

I don’t want to sound negative here but I don’t know any lady that was surprised by #MeToo

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Supreme Court Strikes Down Law against Sports Betting – But Broadcasters Need to Proceed with Caution

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 4:44 am

On Monday, the US Supreme Court issued an opinion striking down a Federal law (the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act or “PASPA”) which prohibited state legislatures from taking any action to legalize betting on sports. PASPA also contained a restriction on advertising sports betting. The state of New Jersey challenged that law, arguing that it improperly limited the authority of state legislatures to act. The Supreme Court agreed, and invalidated the entire Act, including the restriction on advertising sports betting. Some trade press articles have suggested that this signals a boom for broadcasters and other ad-supported media companies as companies rush to start advertising legal sports betting now that the prohibition is gone. While in the long run that may be true, and there may be immediate benefits to stations in certain states, there are numerous caveats for broadcasters to consider before they recognize an advertising boom from sports betting companies.

The entire decision was not based on any analysis of whether or not betting on sports is a good thing, but instead it was a decision based exclusively on a question of state’s rights. The Supreme Court determined that Congress cannot tell state legislatures what they can and cannot do. While Congress may have the authority to ban or otherwise regulate sports betting, if they wanted to regulate it, they should have done so directly. Instead, as the law prohibited state legislatures from taking action to legalize sports betting and other actions predicated on that limitation on states rights, the Supreme Court determined that this was an exercise of authority that Congress does not have – Congress can’t tell state legislatures what to do. Based on the Court’s analysis that all parts of the act were premised on this ban on state legislative actions, the entire law was struck down. That means that there is no blanket federal ban on sports betting, and it leaves each state to regulate as it may wish. For companies ready to take bets on sporting events, and media companies who want to take advertising from sports betting companies, in most cases they need to wait for the states to make decisions on how to proceed.

As the Court noted, at the time of the passage of the legislation, three states (including Nevada) already had laws allowing betting on sports. Apparently, in addition to New Jersey, several other states have already passed laws allowing sports betting if the Supreme Court permitted it. And bills are pending to legalize sports betting in many other states. But there are many states in which there is no clear law permitting sports betting. As DraftKings and FanDuel found out in recent years as they attempted to establish their fantasy sports business, in many states local authorities were ready to challenge their authority to do so under state laws banning sports betting. While some of these laws were amended to allow for fantasy games, many still prohibit straight-on sports betting. Thus, as long as there are prohibitions in state law against sports betting, media companies in those states need to be restrained in their advertising for this activity.

Even in states where the concept of sports betting has been adopted, the state may still need to adopt regulations to implement the law, and licenses may need to be issued to companies who want to take advantage of the change in the law. And, in the days since the Supreme Court’s ruling, there have even been suggestions that Congress could step in and adopt some sort of legislation limiting sports betting, or that it could legislate some royalty to the sports leagues in connection with permissible betting. In short, broadcasters need to consult local counsel to carefully analyze the laws in their states in making decisions on whether or not they can take ads for sports betting.

Once permitted, there will also be questions of whether stations can take ads for legalized betting in other states. There was a Supreme Court case, Edge Broadcasting, upholding a federal law that restricts stations in a state that has no state lottery from advertising the state lottery in an adjacent state. See our post here about an FCC decision fining a station for violating this law by running an ad for an adjacent state’s lottery.   But there is also a Supreme Court ruling in the Greater New Orleans case that has been considered to permit truthful advertising for legal casino gambling. How sports betting will be treated remains to be seen.  Note, too, that there may well be further litigation to decide these issues.

Also, broadcasters should consider restrictions that may exist in various program contracts that can restrict specific types of advertising. As we wrote here, many sports leagues have restrictions in their contracts as to the type of ads that can be run when their games are being shown. Sports betting is likely to be included among the categories of impermissible advertising in many such contracts. Broadcasters should also consider the age of the audience for programs in which any advertising is being run to make sure that that audience is appropriate for receiving messages about legalized betting on sports.

All in all, the decision this week was a good one for media companies. But whether it will mean, in the short term, a big new source of advertising revenue for stations across the country remains to be seen.

 

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