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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » May » 22


Patterning 2 is coming, and it’s going to be awesome

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 11:30 pm

First Oympia Noise Co brought us Patterning, and we loved it, now they bring us Patterning 2, the next generation of the circular drum machine. With the same intuitive interface that is both easy to use and deep with features for the experienced producer. Patterning 2 is a whole new app and not an update to the existing version. The new app is on pre-order right now for

Here’s what’s new in Patterning 2:

  • Recording Beats & Automation
  • Drum Kit Switching
  • Randomize (Almost) Everything
  • Next Generation Ratcheting
  • Coarse Tune Quantization
  • Quantized Pattern Launch
  • Sample Folders
  • Loop Rotate
  • Pattern Tempo Changes
  • Divide Mode Measure Length
  • New Automation Layers
  • Ableton Link Start/Stop
  • MIDI Learn Recording
  • MIDI Drum Triggering
  • MIDI Only Tracks
  • Custom MIDI CC Outputs
  • MIDI Gate Length Automation
  • Under the Hood Performance Improvements
  • Workflow Enhancements
  • And more…

Other Key Features:

  • Download hundreds of free factory and user-created drum kits.
  • Export directly to an Ableton Live Set or perfect audio loops.
  • Deep integration with MIDI for controlling and being controlled by hardware gear.
  • Sync with Ableton Live and other apps using Ableton Link.

SPECIFICATIONS :

iOS 10+, Recommended for iPad 3 and newer, Languages : English

PATTERNS

  • Unique circular sequencer with independent settings for each loop in each pattern. Create poly-metric and poly-rhythmic beats like never before.
  • Variable loop lengths from 1 to 64 steps.
  • Step durations from a thirty-second note up to a whole note, with dotted notes and triplets along the way.
  • NEW : Next generation ratcheting with unique “ratchet decay” setting for creating textural rolls and fast subdivisions of the beat.
  • NEW : Quantized pattern launching. Launch a pattern on the next down beat, nearest 32nd note, 16 measures in the future or anywhere in between.
  • Get wild with loop modes : Forwards, Reverse, Urn (random without repeating), and two Pendulum modes.
  • Auto-Rotate feature spins the loop after each rotation to create evolving rhythms.
  • NEW : Change a loop’s starting point with the new loop rotate feature. Nudge loops slightly off the grid or rotate by subdivisions of a step.
  • NEW : Updated Divide mode allows you to explore exotic polyrhythms like 7 against 11, 35 against 36, or even 3 against 4. New in version 2 is the ability to change the measure length of divide mode.
  • NEW : Attach tempo changes to patterns to change up the pace. Slide gradually to the new tempo or jump immediately to it.
  • 64 bits of sample velocity sensitivity. (That’s a lot of sensitivity!)
  • Draw and erase tools.
  • Special “Pen Echo” mode for quick entry of repeating patterns.

AUDIO & ABLETON LIVE EXPORT

  • Easily export multitrack or stereo audio files from Patterning.
  • Export directly to an Ableton Live Set with individual tracks for audio and MIDI. Includes a free copy of Ableton Live Lite! Get the download link from the Export window.

DRUM KITS & SAMPLES

  • NEW : Dynamically swap drum kits, changing samples and settings when a Pattern changes.
  • NEW : Download 100s of free factory and user generated drum kits with Cloud Kits. New kits are being added all the time!
  • NEW : Organize samples into folders.
  • NEW : Create your own kits and export them to share with other Patterning users via Cloud Kits.
  • Easy import your own samples with Dropbox, Audioshare, Files, or iTunes File Sharing.

INSTRUMENTS

  • NEW : Randomization of instrument parameters.
  • NEW : Quantized Coarse Tuning for easy melodic compositions. Works with randomization for randomly generated melodies.
  • Sample start and end times.
  • Sample gain.
  • Attack, hold, decay envelope for shaping the amplitude of your sounds.
  • Coarse and fine tuning.
  • 2 choke groups.
  • Multimode filter with variable resonance and cutoff frequency.
  • Delay and reverb sends.
  • Panning
  • Mute / Solo
  • Track Volume
  • Amazing visualizer!

AUTOMATION

  • Automation layers for animating track parameters : coarse and fine tuning, effects sends, panning, filter frequency and resonance, probability, and envelope settings.
  • NEW : Automate Parameter Randomization Amount.
  • NEW : Ratchet Count and Ratchet Decay automation.
  • NEW : Automate MIDI CCs & MIDI Gate Length.
  • NEW : Automation Record toggles on when recording is enabled.
  • NEW : Record automation using MIDI controllers.

NEW : RECORDING & MIDI INPUT

  • NEW : Record Pads allow you for recording patterns.
  • NEW : Overdub while recording to add parts one at a time.
  • NEW : Assign a MIDI controller to pads to play Patterning with using an external controller or to record.
  • NEW : Metronome
  • NEW : Quickly clear patterns or loops.
  • Use MIDI Learn to control Patterning with external MIDI devices. Customizable MIDI mapping to parameter ranges.

SONG MODE

  • Fill the timeline with patterns to create songs.
  • Seamlessly toggle timeline on and off during playback.
  • Loop mode for endless pattern sequences.
  • Double tap to jump to a block in the timeline.
  • Time signature and snap settings for maximum flexibility.
  • Multiple selection in timeline for quick duplication and editing.

FX

  • Digital Delay with feedback filter.
  • Tempo sync & free delay time modes.
  • 3 band EQ.
  • Unique distortion unit.
  • Reverb.

MIDI

  • Instrument MIDI settings allows maximum flexibility for ports, channels, and pitch.
  • Coarse Tune > MIDI Note automation for melodic MIDI sequencing.
  • Fine Tune > Pitch Bend automation for automating MIDI pitch bend.
  • NEW : Create MIDI CC automation lanes.
  • NEW : MIDI Note Length automation. Lengths longer than 100% are tied to successive notes to make longer MIDI notes.
  • Rock solid MIDI clock sync receive and send.
  • NEW : Audio/MIDI/Both setting to configure instrument output.
  • NEW : MIDI Settings are now accessible on the main PATTERN screen.
  • Import MIDI settings for quick MIDI mapping templates.

INTER-APP AUDIO

  • Master or individual track outputs for processing in IAA host apps like AUM and Audiobus.
  • Inter-App Audio clock sync and transport via the main IAA port.

ABLETON LINK

  • Use Ableton Link to sync Patterning to other devices or apps wirelessly. It’s like magic!
  • NEW : Link Start/Stop Support
  • NEW : Link Quantum Setting for configuring start/stop timing.

Patterning is available for pre-order for $14.99 on the app store with an expected release date of 31 July.

The post Patterning 2 is coming, and it’s going to be awesome appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The big bangers: grime smashes into the Hadron Collider

Delivered... Tara Joshi | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 5:44 pm

They rapped in its tunnels and played instruments made out of old science equipment. Could this be Cern’s most amazing experiment yet?

‘Anyone attending the performances,” says Jack Jelfs, “will find themselves in a 12-dimensional quantum superposition.” This superposition, adds the artist, will contain three overlaid elements: our mythic past, our scientific present and our unknown future. “So,” concludes Jelfs, “you may wish to prepare appropriately.”

Jelfs is talking about The Wave Epoch, a high-concept performance piece that is the result of four British artists spending time at Cern (the European Organisation for Nuclear Research), where particles are accelerated and bashed into each other to reveal the secrets of the universe. When it’s described as “something between an installation, a music performance and a rave”, The Wave Epoch might not sound like anything particularly new, but it all becomes a lot more original when you realise it was conceived 175 metres underneath the Franco-Swiss border in the presence of the Large Hadron Collider, the biggest single piece of machinery in existence.

Scientists were asking me questions like: ‘Do you understand what we’re made of as humans?'

Continue reading...

Copyright Royalty Board Announces Proposed New SoundExchange Royalties for Business Establishment Services

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 4:52 pm

While Copyright Royalty Board decisions on royalties for webcasters, Sirius XM and mechanical royalties get most of the attention, the CRB also sets rates paid by “business establishment services” for the “ephemeral copies” made in their music businesses. Business establishment services are the companies that provide music to businesses to play in retail stores, restaurants and other commercial establishments. These services have come a long way from the elevator music that once was so derided – and now set the mood in all sorts of businesses with formats as varied as the commercial businesses themselves.  While the rates paid by these services pay for music rights is a little off-topic for this blog, these rates are a bit unusual, so they are worth mentioning.  The Copyright Royalty Board just announced a proposed settlement between the services that were participating in the CRB case and SoundExchange which will raise the rates gradually from the current 12.5% of revenue to 13.5% over the next 5 years, with a minimum annual fee of $20,000, up from $10,000. These rates, which apply to any company that does not negotiate direct royalties with the sound recording copyright holders, go into effect in 2019 and will be in place through 2023. Comments on these proposed rates are due June 18, though CRB rules limit the consideration of comments from those who were not participants in the proceeding.

We have written about the rates paid by these services before (see for instance our articles here, here and here).  What makes them unusual is that the royalties are not paid to SoundExchange for the public performance of sound recordings, as are the royalties paid by other digital music services including webcasters (here and here) or Sirius XM.  That is because, in adopting Section 114 of the Copyright Act, Congress did not want to impose on businesses a new performance right, as there is no general public performance right in sound recordings in the United States.  Businesses and other services that do not digitally transmit performances of audio recordings have no obligation to pay copyright holders in the sound recordings (usually the record companies) or artists for the public performance of music.  Users do, however, pay fees for the public performance of the underlying composition through ASCAP, BMI and SESAC and GMR.  As we wrote here, the Register of Copyrights has suggested that a general public performance right in sound recordings be paid in the United States. But that would impose new fees on all businesses that use recorded music in the US, from stadiums playing “We Will Rock You” at the appropriate point in a big game, to DJs spinning their discs in nightclubs, to the trendy tunes playing in the hip clothing retail stores, to over-the-air radio. This proposal is therefore very controversial.  So, if they are not paying public performance fees, why do background music services have to pay SoundExchange?

Payments are made for the “ephemeral copies” made by these services, and paid under Section 112 of the Copyright Act.  Ephemeral copies are those copies made in the digital transmission process – everything from the server copies that the music services make in their music storage systems when they put the programming together to the copies made elsewhere on the Internet as these tunes make their way to the ultimate user.  If a retailer just wanted to play CDs in its stores, there would be no SoundExchange liability as there would be no ephemeral copies (though, in all but the smallest businesses, there would still be an obligation to pay ASCAP, BMI and SESAC and GMR to the extent that their songs are used.  But the digital transmission makes the difference.

The rates themselves are interesting, in that they are actually so high for business establishment services for copies that are essentially transitory.  As we have written before, there are debates as to whether these ephemeral copies really have any independent value at all.  In connection with royalties for other digital music services, they are in effect treated as part of the performance royalty, and are usually just a percentage (under 10%) of that royalty.  But, in connection with the Business Establishment Service, where they are the entire royalty, they are 12.5%-13.5% of the entire revenue of the business – presumably just a way of getting a performance royalty by a different name.

But business establishment services – those services creating music to be sold to commercial establishments to use in their businesses, need to be aware of the new royalties and the higher fees that kick in on January 1, 2019.

FL Studio 20 for Windows and now Mac, with Hell-freezing functionality

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 1:21 pm

FL Studio aka Fruity Loops has hit a version the developers are dubbing FL Studio 20. At age 20, the software still includes lifetime free updates – and a bunch of new features, including freezing of audio, and Hell freezing over.

The “Hell freezing over” bit you’ll see a lot around this release. It’s a reference to a claim developers Image-Line made that they’d add native Mac support “when Hell freezes over.” The comment at the time wasn’t so outrageous: FL Studio had been built a Windows-native development toolchain that made porting unthinkable. And while about ten years ago the company flirted with using emulation layer WINE to provide rudimentary support, that approach wasn’t terribly satisfying.

Now, Mac users can be first class FL Studio citizens if they so choose. FL Studio 20 is entirely Mac native – not running any kind of emulation. Of course, it may be hard to Image-Line to shake the Windows association, and some Mac users are coming the opposite direction, opting for the power-for-price ratio on Windows PCs. But the Mac still represents a huge portion of musicians, and this means choosing FL doesn’t require choosing a particular OS.

(I will say, though – a new Razer Blade is out. And even the old Razer Blade remains cheaper and better equipped than the Mac. Now you do have to disable some Windows 10 annoyances, like a CPU-hogging malware check and automatic updates on by default. Ahem.)

Hell isn’t the only thing FL Studio can freeze. You can now bounce selected audio and pattern clips to audio, render clips to audio, consolidate clips or tracks or takes by bouncing, and more. That’s a huge difference in the FL workflow.

There are plenty of other new features in version 20, too:

Time Signature support (both in playlists and patterns, independently – so, yes, polymetric support if you like – and you thought FL Studio was just for 4/4 trance.)

Playlist Arrangements. Here’s something I find I’m often missing in linear DAWs – you can now set up multiple alternate arrangements, including audio, automation, and pattern clips, all in one project. That could be massive for tasks from trying out alternative song ideas to specific game or live performance sound designs. (I could see a theater show design using this … or fitting a score to different versions of a film trailer … and so on.)

Plugin Delay Compensation, rebuilt. FL already had delay compensation, both automatic and plugin varieties, but it’s been rebuilt from the ground up, say the developers. And it sounds very useful: “Mixer send compensation, Wet/Dry mixer FX compensation, Audio input compensation, Metronome compensation, Plugin Wrapper custom values remembered per-plugin and improved PDC controls in the Mixer.”

Graph Editor is back! This should never really have left, but a “classic” FL feature has returned, letting you edit MIDI information from the Channel Rack – a very Fruity Loops workflow.

Better recording. There’s now a live display of recorded audio and automatic grouping of tracks as you record – both overdue but welcome.

There are loads of improvements to various plugins, of course, plus lots of other fixes and improvements. Details in the manual:

New Features in FL Studio 20

It’s also pretty remarkable that FL Studio has hit 20 years without ditching its lifetime free upgrade policy. FL users have a substantially different relationship with the software than do users of most typical DAWs, both because of its unique workflow and interface and that lifetime policy. But I’m personally intrigued to give it another go – bouncing and working delay compensation make a big dfference, and FL remains a peculiar, interesting toybox full of nice stuff. I think the fact that FL has perhaps not been taken as seriously as tools like Cubase or Ableton Live might itself be a badge of honor – if you can adapt to its often nonstandard ways of working, it offers some big rewards on a small budget.

Announcing FL STUDIO 20 [FL Studio News]

And… uff… Image-Line again launch with a video with truly terrible music. (Sorry, guys!) But… who cares? Go make whatever music you want in it. It’s a production tool!

How to watch the Image-Line launch video without clawing out your eadrums

Okay, so… I have a theory.

Maybe one reason people assume FL Studio is for people making terrible dance music is … because Image-Line (sorry, guys) insist on putting terrible dance music beds underneath the videos. Oh, sure, Ableton can throw a big posh party in Berlin and toss moody high-contrast artist photos beneath a stylish typeface they hired a London design consultancy to choose for them. FL Studio’s video is slightly more … uh … pedestrian.

So I’ve found a solution. First, cue up this delightful live performance of “Söngur heiftar” by classic Icelandic black metal band Misþyrming. It’s a little longer than the FL Studio 20 launch video, so don’t panic … you’ve got up to 60 seconds to then hit play on the FL Studio launch video, and hit the mute button in YouTube.

It’s the “Dark Side of the Moon” / Wizard of Oz approach to making music tech marketing videos more palatable. And it kind of fits. You’re welcome.

You’ll need the sound back on for this one, but here’s an extended tutorial video explaining what’s new:

The post FL Studio 20 for Windows and now Mac, with Hell-freezing functionality appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

We are going to play a different set at Imagica: Lost Stories – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... "Indian Electronic Music" - Google News | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 12:06 pm

RadioandMusic.com

We are going to play a different set at Imagica: Lost Stories
RadioandMusic.com
MUMBAI: Duo Prayag Mehta and Rishabh Joshi called by their stage name Lost Stories, have been a frontrunner of the electronic dance music in India for quite some time now. They are truly known for their songs which are official remixes for Alan Walker ...

IceGear Instruments release their latest synth – Kronecker the clockwork synthesizer

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 12:02 am

IceGear Instruments have brought us a range of excellent synths over the years, from their very first app Argon, right through to their latest series of iOS synths. Their latest creation is intriguing to say the least. Kronecker is described as a synthesizer that’s like a clockwork toy with a mechanism that is able to rhythmically trigger sounds like a rhythm machine each time you press a key on the keyboard.

In addition to synchronizing the trigger speed to the tempo, you can gradually increase the speed or slow it down after pressing the key. This makes it possible to produce synthesizer sounds similar to the sounds bounced by the bouncing ball. Which I’m sure is something we all have wanted to do at some point right?

The app has four emitters, which means that Kronecker emits particles of sound made from both FM tones and noise. At the emitter you can specify at what time the sound particles will be triggered. It is also possible to add changes such that the pitch of the particles gradually increases.

Particles of the sound emitted by the emitter can be processed with two resonators, and you can reproduce the sound of particles jumping over strings and pipes.

Kronecker works not only on the iPad but also on the iPhone. It also supports Audio Unit Extensions (AUv3), so you can plug in to AUv3 compatible host. For each screen size, different layouts are designed to be easy to use and intuitive. The app also supports Inter-App Audio, Audiobus and Ableton Link.

Kronecker costs $7.99 on the app store

The post IceGear Instruments release their latest synth – Kronecker the clockwork synthesizer appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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