Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » June » 05


From Doctor Who to Joy Division: five of the greatest Maida Vale recordings

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Tue 5 Jun 2018 5:39 pm

With the legendary BBC studio relocating to east London, we look back at decades of priceless recordings, including Bing Crosby’s final work and Adele’s masterful Dylan cover version

Built in 1934, the BBC’s Maida Vale studios in west London, soon to be crossing the capital to Stratford, has played host to just as much legendary music as its near neighbour Abbey Road. As the home of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, there was a steady stream of world-class classical music throughout, but it was also there when the BBC woke up to pop music in the 1960s. Thanks to the catholic tastes of John Peel, it has heard everything from doom metal to pure pop bouncing off its walls. Here are five of Maida Vale’s key moments.

Related: From Olympic Park to East Bank: how St Paul's 'faux pas' led to design rethink

Continue reading...

Google Announces Programmatic Buys of Audio Ads – Looking at Legal Issues with Programmatic Sales

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 5 Jun 2018 4:25 pm

Last week, it was announced that Google through its DoubleClick platform, would be offering programmatic buying opportunities for advertisers looking to place audio ads into online streams. While that system is initially being rolled out among the big digital audio services, if it or other similar platforms are expanded more broadly, it could bring more advertising into internet radio, podcasting and other digital audio program channels. But, being the spoilsports that we tend to be as lawyers, we wanted to pass on some issues to consider in accepting programmatic buys – whether in online streams or in over-the-air broadcasts. The immediacy of the audience’s perception of an audio insertion into a program stream can bring unintended results – some of which may have legal consequences.

We have already written about the issues for some of the programmatic buying platforms that are inserting ads into broadcast radio and television programming. As we wrote here and here, these ads can potentially impact a broadcaster’s legal compliance – particularly in the area of political broadcasting, where these ads could affect a station’s lowest unit rate, as well as reasonable access, equal opportunities and even political file disclosure obligations. While none of these FCC issues apply directly to online ads, as we wrote here, there are potential rules on political advertising that may soon be applied to online ads, either through actions by the Federal government or by the enactment of rules to implement a recently passed New York State law that compels disclosures for online political ads similar to those required by the FCC for broadcast ads. There are other considerations as well.

When we wrote about the impact of programmatic buying on broadcast ads, we mentioned the concern about complying with the FCC’s sponsorship identification rules. While the FCC’s rules apply only to over-the-air broadcasting, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has similar disclosure obligations for online ads. See our articles here and here for more details. While one might expect that these sponsorship identification issues would be the responsibility of the advertiser, the insertion of the ads into online streams may make the ad seem more like part of the programming offered by an Internet radio company or digital audio provider. Even were the FTC to look only to the ad provider for liability purposes (which is not a certainty), there may be inquiries first to the platform on which the ad is hosted, which may cost, if nothing else, time and money to respond.

Similar issues may arise with other types of advertising. While the typical direct advertiser coming through an advertising agency is likely to be familiar with the ins and outs of other advertising rules (e.g., disclosure of credit terms on leases; making health claims about certain types of unproven drugs, vitamin products or even vaping products; comparative advertising disclosures; ads containing celebrity endorsement and testimonials, etc.), an ad placed directly though some programmatic platform by a local business may not be as sophisticated in complying with all these advertising limitations.

Even outside the legal issues that may arise, there may be business concerns when advertisers have direct access to automatically place their ads into your online advertising. If, for instance, you are running a Christian music webcasting operation, you can imagine various categories of advertising that you would not want to find inserted into your stream – and certainly there could be an audience reaction. That has been an issue from time to time with various website operators who find an ad service has placed an unwanted banner ad on its site conveying a message antithetical to the message that the site owner is looking to convey. A negative reaction is even more likely should an audio ad conveying an unwanted message pop up in your stream.

Does that mean that programmatic ads should not be taken? Likely not, as they are an important method for attracting more new advertising to your online audio products. But, as with any other new product, make sure proper protections are in place to avoid having material placed into your stream that has not been vetted in some way to insure compliance with the law and with any message that you are trying to convey through your online audio programming.

The best news for iOS, macOS musicians and artists from WWDC

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 5 Jun 2018 4:02 pm

Apple’s WWDC, while focused on developers, tends to highlight consumer features of its OS – not so much production stuff. But as usual, there are some tidbits for creative Mac and iOS users.

Here’s the stuff that looks like good news, at least in previews. Note that Apple tends to focus on just major new features they want to message, so each OS may reveal more in time.

iOS 12

Performance. On both iPad and iPhone, Apple is promising big performance optimizations. They’ve made it sound like they’re particularly targeting older devices, which should come as welcome news to users finding their iThings feel sluggish with age. (iPhone 5s and iPad Air onwards get the update.)

A lot of this has to do with responsiveness when launching apps or bringing up the keyboard or camera, so it may not directly impact audio apps – most of which do their heavy work at a pretty low level. But it’s nice to see Apple improve the experience for long-term owners, not just show off things that are new. And even as Android devices boast high-end specs on paper, that platform still lags iOS badly when it comes to things like touch response or low-latency audio.

Smoother animation is also a big one.

Augmented reality. Apple has updated their augmented reality to ARKit 2. These are the tools that let you map 3D objects and visualizations to a real-world camera feed – it basically lets you hold up a phone or tablet instead of don goggles, and mix the real world view with the virtual one.

New for developers: persist your augmented reality between sessions (without devs having to do that themselves), object detection and tracking, and multi-user support. They’ve also unveiled a new format for objects.

I know AR experimentation is already of major interest to digital artists. The readiness of iOS as a platform means they have a canvas for those experiments.

There are also compelling music and creative applications, some still to be explored. Imagine using an augmented reality view to help visualize spatialized audio. Or use a camera to check out how a modular rack or gear will fit in your studio. And there are interesting possibilities in education. (Think a 3D visualization of acoustic waves, for instance.)

Both augmented reality and virtual reality offer some new immersive experiences musicians and artists are sure to exploit. Hey, no more playing Dark Side of the Moon to The Wizard of Oz; now you can deliver an integrated AV experience.

Google’s Android and Apple are neck and neck here, but because Apple delivers updates faster, they can rightfully claim to be the largest platform for the technology. (They also have devices: iPhone SE / 6s and up and 5th generation iPad and iPads Pro all work.) Google’s challenge here I think is really adoption.

Apple’s also pretty good at telling the story here:
https://www.apple.com/ios/augmented-reality/

That said, Google has some really compelling 3D audio solutions – more on this landscape soon, on both platforms.

Real Do Not Disturb. This is overdue, but I think a major addition for those of us wanting to focus on music on iOS and not have to deal with notifications.

Siri Shortcuts. This is a bit like the third-party power app Workflow; it allows you to chain activities and apps together. I expect that could be meaningful to advanced iOS users; we’ll just have to see more details. It could mean, for instance, handy record + process audio batches.

Voice Memos on iPad. I know a lot of musicians still use this so – now you’ve got it in both places, with cloud sync.

https://www.apple.com/ios/ios-12-preview/features/

macOS 10.14 Mojave

Dark Mode. Finally. And another chance to keep screens from blaring at us in studios or onstage – though Windows and Linux users have this already, of course.

Improved Finder. This is more graphics oriented than music oriented, of course – but creative users in general will appreciate the complete metadata preview pane.

Also nice: Quick Actions, which also support the seldom-used, ill-documented, but kind of amazing Automator. Automator also has a lot of audio-specific actions with some apps; it’s worth checking out.

There are also lots of nice photo and image markup tools.

Stacks. Iterations of this concept have been around since the 90s, but finally we see it in an official Apple OS release. Stacks organize files on your desktop automatically, so you don’t have a pile of icons everywhere. Apple got us in this mess in the 80s (or is that Xerox in the 70s) but … finally they’re helping us dig out again.

App Store and the iOS-Mac ecosystem. Apple refreshing their App Store may be a bigger deal than it seems. A number of music developers are seeing big gains on Apple mobile platforms – and they’re trying to leverage that success by bringing apps to desktop Mac, something that the Windows ecosystem really doesn’t provide. It sounds like Intua, creators of BeatMaker, might even have a desktop app in store.

And having a better App Store means that it’s more likely developers will be able to sell their apps – meaning more Mac music apps.

https://www.apple.com/macos/mojave-preview/

That’s about it

There’s of course a lot more to these updates, but more on either the developer side or consumer things less relevant to our audience.

The big question for Apple remains – what is their hardware roadmap? The iPad has no real rivals apart from shifting focus to Windows-native tablets like the Surface, but the Mac has loads of competition for visual and music production.

Generally, I don’t know that either Windows or macOS can deliver a lot for pro users in these kinds of updates. We’re at a mature, iterative phase for desktop OSes. But that’s okay.

Now, what we hope as always is that updates don’t just break our existing stuff. Case in point: Apple moving away from OpenCL and OpenGL.

But even there, as one reader comments, hardware is everything. Apple dropping OpenCL isn’t as big to some developers and artists as the fact that you can’t buy a machine with an NVIDIA card in it.

Well, we’ll be watching. And as usual, anything that may or may not break audio and music tools, we’ll find out only closer to release.

The post The best news for iOS, macOS musicians and artists from WWDC appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE VOODOO EXPERIENCE LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 5 Jun 2018 4:00 pm
Mumford and Sons, Childish Gambino and Arctic Monkeys all headline!

Apple to open source, cross-platform GPU tech: drop dead?

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 5 Jun 2018 2:18 pm

Apple’s decision to shift to its own proprietary tech for accessing modern GPUs could hurt research, education, and pro applications on their platform.

OpenGL and OpenCL are the industry-standard specifications for writing code that runs on graphics architectures, for graphics and general-purpose computation, including everything from video and 3D to machine learning.

This is relevant to an ongoing interest on this site – those technologies also enable live visuals (including for music), creative coding, immersive audiovisual performance, and “AI”-powered machine learning experiments in music and art.

OpenGL and OpenCL, while sometimes arcane technologies, enable a wide range of advanced, cross-platform software. They’re also joined by a new industry standard, Vulkan. Cross-platform code is growing, not shrinking, as artists, researchers, creative professionals, experimental coders, and other communities contribute new generations of software that work more seamlessly across operating systems.

And Apple has just quietly blown off all those groups. From the announcement to developers regarding macOS 10.14:

Deprecation of OpenGL and OpenCL

Apps built using OpenGL and OpenCL will continue to run in macOS 10.14, but these legacy technologies are deprecated in macOS 10.14. Games and graphics-intensive apps that use OpenGL should now adopt Metal. Similarly, apps that use OpenCL for computational tasks should now adopt Metal and Metal Performance Shaders.

They’re also deprecating OpenGL ES on iOS, with the same logic.

Metal is fine technology, but it’s specific to iOS and Mac OS. It’s not open, and it won’t run on other platforms.

Describing OpenGL and OpenCL as “legacy” is indeed fine. But as usual, the issue with Apple is an absence of information, and that’s what’s problematic. Questions:

What’s the timeline for deprecating OpenCL/OpenGL?

What about support for Vulkan? Apple are a partner in the Khronos Group, which develops this industry-wide standard. It isn’t in fact “legacy,” and it’s designed to solve the same problems as Metal does. Is Metal being chosen over Vulkan?

What happens on the Web? Cross-platform here is even more essential, since your 3D or machine learning code for a browser needs to work in multiple scenarios.

Transparency and information might well solve this, but for now we’re a bit short on both.

Metal support in Unity. Frameworks like Unity may be able to smooth out platform differences for developers (including artists).

A case for Apple pushing Metal

First off, there is some sense to Apple’s move here. Metal – like DirectX on Windows or Mantle from AMD – is a lower-level language for addressing the graphics hardware. That means less overhead, higher performance, and extra features. It suggests Apple is pushing their mobile platforms in particular as an option for higher-end games. We’ve seen gaming companies Razer and Asus create Android phones that have high-end specs on paper, but without a low-level API for graphics hardware or a significant installed base, those are more proof of concept than they are useful as game platform.

And Apple does love to deprecate APIs to force developers onto the newest stuff. That’s why so often your older OS versions are so quickly unsupported, even when developers don’t want to abandon you.

On mobile, Apple never implemented OpenCL in the first place. And there’s arguably a more significant gap between OpenGL ES and something like Metal for performance.

Another business case: Apple may be trying to drive a wedge in development between iOS and Android, to ensure more iOS-only games and the like. Since they can’t make platform exclusives the way something like a PlayStation or Nintendo Switch or Xbox can, this is one way to do it.

And it seems Apple is moving away from third-party hardware vendors, meaning they control both the spec here and the chips inside their devices.

But that doesn’t automatically make any of this more useful to end users and developers, who reap benefits from cross-platform support. It significantly increases the workload on Apple to develop APIs and graphics hardware – and to encourage enough development to keep up with competing ecosystems. So there’s a reason for standards to exist.

Vulkan offers some of the low-level advantages of Metal (or DirectX) … but it works cross-platform, even including Web contexts.

Pulling out of an industry standard group

The significant factor here about OpenGL generally is, it’s not software. It’s a specification for an API. And for the moment, it remains the industry standard specification for interfacing with the GPU. Unlike their move to embrace new variations of USB and Thunderbolt over the years, or indeed the company’s own efforts in the past to advance OpenGL, Apple isn’t proposing an alternative standard. They’re just pulling out of a standard the entire industry supports, without any replacement.

And this impacts a range of cross-platform software, open source software, and the ability to share code and research across operating systems, including but not limited to:

Video editing
Post production
Generative graphics
Digital art
VJing and live visual software
Creative coding
Machine learning and neural network tools

Cross platform portability for those use cases meets a significant set of needs. Educators wanting to teach how to write shaders now face having students with Apple hardware having to use a different language, for example. Gamers wanting access to the largest possible library – as on services like Steam – will now likely see more platform-exclusive titles instead on the Apple hardware. And pros wanting access to specific open source, high-end video tools… well, here’s yet another reason to switch to Windows or Linux.

This doesn’t so much impact developers who rely on existing libraries that target Metal specifically. So, for instance, developing in the Unity Game Engine means your creation can use Metal on Apple platforms and OpenGL elsewhere. But because of the size of the ecosystem here, that won’t be the case for a lot of other use cases.

And yeah, I’m serious about Linux as a player here. As Microsoft and Apple continue to emphasize consumers over pros, cramming huge updates over networks and trying to foist them on users, desktop Linux has quietly gotten a lot more stable. For pro video production, post production, 3D, rendering, machine learning, research, and – even a growing niche of people working in audio and music – Linux can simply out-perform its proprietary relatives and save money and time.

So what happened to Vulkan?

Apple could have joined with the rest of the industry in supporting a new low-level API for computation and graphics. That standard is now doubly important as machine learning technology drives new ideas across art, technology, and society.

https://www.khronos.org/vulkan/

And apart from the value of it being a standard, Apple would break with important hardware partners here at their own peril. Yes, Apple makes a lot of their own hardware under the hood – but not all of it. Will they also make a move to proprietary graphics chips on the Mac, and will those keep up with PC offerings? (There is currently a Vulkan SDK for Mac. It’s unclear exactly how it will evolve in the wake of this decision.)

ExtremeTech have a scathing review of the sitution. it’s a must-read, as it clearly breaks down the different pipelines and specs and how they work. But it also points out, Apple have tended to lag not just in hardware adoption but in their in-house support efforts. That suggests you get an advantage from being on Windows or Linux, generally:

Apple brings its Metal API to OS X 10.11, kicks Vulkan to the curb

Fragmentation or standards

Let’s be clear – even with OpenGL and OpenCL, there’s loads of fragmentation in the fields I mention, from hardware to firmware to drivers to SDKs. Making stuff work everywhere is messy.

But users, researchers, and developers do reap real benefits from cross-platform standards and development. And Metal alone clearly doesn’t provide that.

Here’s my hope: I hope that while deprecating OpenGL/CL, Apple does invest in Vulkan and its existing membership in Khronos Group (the industry consortium that supports that API as well as OpenGL). Apple following up this announcement with some news on Vulkan and cross-platform support – and how the transition to that and Metal would work – could turn the mood around entirely.

Apple’s reputation may be proprietary, but this is also the company that pushed USB and Thunderbolt, POSIX and WebKit, that used a browser to sell its first phone, and that was a leading advocate (ironically) for OpenGL and OpenCL.

As game directors and artists and scientists and thinkers all explore the possibilities of new graphics hardware, from virtual reality to artificial intelligence, we have some real potential ahead. The platforms that will win I think will be the ones that maximize capabilities and minimize duplication of effort.

And today, at least, Apple are leaving a lot of those users in the dark about just how that future will work.

I’d love your feedback. I’m ranting here partly because I know a lot of the most interesting folks working on this are readers, so do please get in touch. You know more than I do, and I appreciate your insights.

More:

https://developer.apple.com/macos/whats-new/

https://www.khronos.org/opengl/wiki/FAQ

https://www.khronos.org/vulkan/

https://developer.apple.com/documentation/metalperformanceshaders

… and what this headline is referencing

The post Apple to open source, cross-platform GPU tech: drop dead? appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

MUSIC MIDTOWN DATES ANNOUNCED

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 5 Jun 2018 2:00 pm
Get all the details!
TunePlus Wordpress Theme