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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » July » 02


Blue Mangoo bring a new universal Parametric Equalizer audio unit to your device

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Mon 2 Jul 2018 11:14 pm

EQ is just one of those essential plugins you can’t do without. Some are great, some are not so great, and some are great but hard to work with, which is just frustrating. Working with iOS apps that both do the job, and do it in a way that makes life easier is a joy to be honest. Especially when you might be working in less than perfect environments such as on trains and buses, where dealing with less than perfect interface design can be deeply annoying.

So when I took a look at the Blue Mangoo Parametric Equalizer I thought I’d take a look at any App Store reviews first to see if it’s something to take seriously. This is what I found:

“I use an equaliser on all my Audiobus preset configurations for iOS synths. I was fine with the way another EQ audio unit app sounded but frustrated with the user interface. I’m a lot happier with this app. It sounds the same as the other app I was using before but the UI is uncluttered and I can dial in my sound more quickly.

There is just one slider on the right that controls the Q of whichever filter you currently have selected. Aside from that, you just pull filter control points into place to set gain and frequency. They automatically disable when you set gain to 0 db, or when you pull the low pass or high pass filters out of the audible frequency range.”

So that’s a good start.

The Blue Mangoo Parametric Equalizer is an audio unit plugin, with six bands of filter controls:

  • Low cut and high cut with adjustable Q (resonance)
  • Two bell filters with adjustable Q
  • Low and high shelf filters

Blue Mangoo Parametric Equalizer costs $2.99 on the app store now (sounds like a bargain to me)

* Blue Mangoo Parametric Equalizer is an AU3 plugin. It runs within an audio unit host app such as Garage Band. It does not run as a standalone app.

The post Blue Mangoo bring a new universal Parametric Equalizer audio unit to your device appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Is WhoSampled’s app set to be the Shazam of pro users?

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 2 Jul 2018 3:11 pm

One app for iOS and Android now recognizes songs – and links you to covers, remixes, and samples. WhoSampled just added song recognition.

First, let’s talk WhoSampled. The site is a database of sample sources, plus remixes and covers – basically, think Discogs for people who want to know where samples came from. This is obviously only really relevant to genres and artists that make heavy use of sampling and remixes, but for those, it’s a fascinating linkhole of musical connections. Here’s a look at Flying Lotus’ back catalog, for instance:

And like Discogs, that data is all human-gathered, not algorithmically collected.

The site already has an app that lets you manually look up that information. Now, you add music recognition. No word yet on whose algorithms they licensed for the recognition – accuracy and content depth remains a stumbling block for some music – but we’ll have to give it a try.

Why this matters: you get a whole bunch of functionality now in this app, between the WhoSampled database, the various features of the app to check out your music collection, and now music recognition, too. In short:

  • Unlimited music recognition (via the mic), irrespective of whether a particular track is in the WhoSampled database
  • A list of track IDs (with login)
  • Favorite tracks
  • Scan your existing Spotify, Apple Music, and iTunes libraries (iOS) or local library (Android) – a fascinating window into the music you’re playing. (And a lot of us duplicate DJ libraries on Android or iOS on the go)
  • Check out sample, cover, and remix connections

All of this will cost you a little bit. In an interesting pricing approach, they’re ad-supported and free on Android, but US$3.99 and ad-free on iOS.

For music recognition, you pay ten bucks a year USD, which then removes ads on all platforms (including the Web).

Take Your Music Recognition Game to the Next Level! Let the WhoSampled App Show You the DNA of the Music Playing Around You

[Whosampled, via rekkerd.org and h/t Oliver Chesler]

The post Is WhoSampled’s app set to be the Shazam of pro users? appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Synths may be spared worst of US trade war – for now

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 2 Jul 2018 1:44 pm

Following Moog Music’s alarmed email regarding US trade policy, some in the synth industry have responded that the immediate impact on manufacturers will be minimal.

Okay, so what’s going on?

The matter of discussion is still a document by the US Trade Representative regarding proposed tariffs or import taxes. These are 25% additional tariffs imposed by the USA on Chinese goods as they’re imported into the United States.

This document has changed over the past months. But the USTR does provide a public comment period for any changes – meaning, while these tariffs are set to go into effect this Friday the 6th of July, theoretically there shouldn’t be any additional changes.

And that’s where there’s a legitimate problem with the way Moog Music – and my own writing here on CDM – presented the problem.

Paul Schreiber, an engineer who has worked with multiple companies in the industry, posted a heated rebuttal to the Moog letter. That was not necessarily to defend Trump administration policy, but rather to suggest that Moog and others may have overreacted or mischaracterized the immediate realities of the policy.

See, previously:
Moog urges US citizens to take action to stop Trump import tax

Long story short: the idea is, the tariffs apply only to small components, like LEDs and potentiometers, but not to more significant expenses like the “circuit boards” Moog mentioned in their email.

And in fact, the cost of those really shouldn’t significantly impact the cost of US-made products, including Moog’s – even on an instrument that’s covered in LEDs and stuffed with circuits, those particular parts make up a relatively small portion of the cost. They’re not meaningless – shaving dollars and even cents off individual components is a pretty major part of the design process. But they’re not the sort of thing that would disrupt jobs or hurt the economy.

The area of confusion may be around circuit boards, as Schreiber observes – and I’m forced to admit, I agree with his assessment. He writes in a follow-up post:

If you search the tariff PDF for ‘printed circuit assemblies’, you get many hits (ATM machines, radiation detectors, etc) and here in Section 90, this one listing.
The ‘issue’ is that the listing of the tariff codes are an ABBREVIATED DESCRIPTION, not ‘as formally written’ in the ACTUAL codes.
The 9030 section of Chapter 90 is SPECIFICALLY talking about oscilloscopes. And this 9030.90.68 is referring to a non-US company, importing a ‘kit of parts’ into the USA, including a stuffed pc board, and then building a scope in the USA.

That’s not necessarily a definitive list, and it is open to interpretation but … I do tend to agree with this interpretation, unless someone can present a compelling alternative reading.

There are still reasons for the electronic musical instrument building community to be concerned. An escalating trade war between the USA and its trading partners could pose unexpected problems in the near future. And if these trading difficulties hurt the US economy, that impact could be felt, too. But it’s important to separate that from the immediate impact on making synths, which for the moment may indeed be negligible.

Other industries have greater cause to worry. The US automakers in particular are seriously concerned about costs for raw materials and retaliatory penalties abroad – but they’re impacted differently than US synthmakers are. Agriculture are concerned, too, as punitive measures cut off markets they need for exports. (And, okay, yes, synthesizers make up a much smaller part of the US economy than cars or agriculture, obviously. I guess we still have work to do? Or we have to figure out how you can ride synthesizers to different places, or … eat them.)

The DIY community I shared in my original post are harder hit, too, as a lot of their products are just these components – see Boing Boing’s story on maker products.

And there’s the fact that the US President is saying threatening things about the EU in general.

But in a heated political climate, it’s important to separate long-term risks from immediate problems, and to keep concerns in scale. For now, it’s reasonable for makers like Moog to protest isolationist or protectionist US trade policy, or heated up trade rhetoric and potential trade wars. But the rules going into effect this week, when viewed just inside the context of our industry, likely aren’t catastrophic – not yet.

I’m awaiting further comment from Moog on their activism and will update this story when that’s available.

Feature photo (CC-BY Paul Downey.

The post Synths may be spared worst of US trade war – for now appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Inside The Bikini Waxx Shop, Berlin’s Best-Kept Record-Digging Secret

Delivered... By Daniel Melfi. Photos by Yacoub Chakarji. | Scene | Mon 2 Jul 2018 8:55 am

The post Inside The Bikini Waxx Shop, Berlin’s Best-Kept Record-Digging Secret appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

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