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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » July » 04


iLEP offers a unique set of FX capabilities for performance and experimentation

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Wed 4 Jul 2018 11:19 pm

iLEP is an interesting concept from a developer we know and love, Oliver Greschke (Elastic Drums, Elastic FX). With iLEP Oliver joined the team later to finish off the app development, but even so it’s a significant credential in my view.

The idea of iLEP is also quite intriguing. It sounds to me like it’s somewhere between instrument and effect, which is in itself a good place to be. The background to iLEP is worth understanding before we delve into the detail of what it actually does.

iLEP (Live Electronic Patch) is the result of many years of collaboration between composers and software engineers with the aim of creating a live-electronic instrument that shows its strongest musical performance in conjunction with an acoustic musical instrument and is especially suitable for use in concerts.

The first version of LEP was developed in Max-MSP by Wolfgang Heiniger and Thomas Kessler and later further developed by Thomas Seelig. Thomas Seelig then redesigned the original version and ported it for the iOS operating system to make the app runable on the iPad and thus accessible to a wide range of applications.

To make it clearer, you probably need a feature list and then to see the videos to get a view on what it actually does.

FEATURES

  • Modular effect app with various routing and modulation options
  • 6 different effects: 2x ring modulator, 2x filter (low, high, band), 2x pitch shifter, 2 delay, degrade, reverb, which can be precisely controlled graphically and by direct parameter input
  • 16*16 patch-possibilities to route audio through different effects, like in a modular system
  • Possible sound sources: Microphone/line in, sampler and pitch tracker, various test signals (sine, noise, sample)
  • Various effect parameters can be modulated to different degrees (min… max) by a modulation source (e.g. Midi Express pedal): Excellent for live applications!
  • An additional effect parameter can be modulated by midi notes
  • Save, import, export and edit your own cue effect configurations
  • Different cues can be combined to a set
  • Import and management of own samples and entire sample libraries assigned to a set
  • Import of midi files for modulation purposes
  • Possibility to automatically run through different cues (presets) with time control using the “Autocue” function
  • Possibility to quickly launch cues (presets) via Midi Bank and Midi program messages
  • Stereo 3-way input equalizer (high shelf, peak notch, low shelf) to adjust input signals
  • Master limiter at the end of the signal chain
  • Audio bus and IAA capable (effect node)

I’d like to see how people start to use this and develop performance capabilities around its use. It feels like iLEP has a lot of power behind it, and also like it might take time and energy invested in it to get the maximum out of it.

iLEP costs $9.99 on the app store now

The post iLEP offers a unique set of FX capabilities for performance and experimentation appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

What makes music and creativity? A talk with Susan Rogers

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Wed 4 Jul 2018 12:46 pm

What makes creativity work in music? What happens in the brain? Susan Rogers has uniquely contemplated those questions both alongside artists like Prince and in research into the mind.

I got the chance to interview Dr. Rogers at SONAR+D last month, and I found my own mind wandering to how her mind works, as she characterized different kinds of intelligence. She exudes an easy sense of empathy, and in both her talks at Ableton Loop and SONAR, she’s quick to remove her own ego and move her role out of the immediate act of creativity. I imagine the ability to do so would be essential when you’re in the studio with Prince or David Byrne or the various other oversized personalities she’s managed to work with over the years. Even our audience members seemed to immediately trust her – that unique unsung talent of the best kinds of people who work behind the superstars in music.

There was a fair bit of talk about Prince at Ableton Loop. But in Barcelona, we got to focus on the mind itself – and as Susan emphasized backstage, how to define what music is in the first place. And that moves us into her work in cognition and the neuroscience that works to decipher it.

Susan is so uniquely positioned to understand this now, surrounded by young, hungry rising musical stars at Berklee atop her decades of experience.

But I also really hope we start more cross-disciplinary conversations about the topic. There’s a slide bringing up classical greats – musicology has been so caught up in comparing manuscripts and whatnot that I think there’s a vast opportunity for more interaction with fields like neuroscience. And some of what Susan describes about creativity and its variability, its interaction with depression and social isolation, the different kinds of aptitudes and thinking styles and what that means for collaboration, I suspect speaks to a lot of us on a deeply personal level. And that may be true in our lives even if we’re nothing like Prince.

Have a watch – I’m sure you’ll be as engaged throughout as I was onstage.

And I hope we look deeper into this, as what better mystery in music to explore than the mind?

Previously:
Ranging from Neurology to Prince, Susan Rogers’ talk is must-watch

The post What makes music and creativity? A talk with Susan Rogers appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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