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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2018 » July » 10


From Japan, an ambient musician on solitude and views of the sea

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 11:28 pm

As haunting, oceanic wells of sound sing achingly in the background, Tokyo-based ambient musician Chihei Hatakeyama talks in a new documentary about what inspires him.

The creative series toco toco follows the musician to the places and views that inspired the images of his music – including gazing into the sea. Of that view, he says:

“There wasn’t any gap in space, it was translating directly into music.”

Filmmaker Anne Ferrero writes to share her work, as she follows the artist “to the roots of his universe, in the Kamakura and Enoshima areas, where he grew up.”

And he speaks of the beauty in ambient music, and its connection to nature. And while solitude in computer music is often seen as something of a liability, here he talks about its importance – as he uses that laptop as a box for editing improvisations.

Being able to create music alone made it more personal. The music that I wanted to make could now express my mind – what I felt inside.

The film is subtitled in English, with Japanese audio. (Don’t forget to turn CC on.)

It’s a deeply personal film all over, and even talks about the journey from electronic sounds on dancefloors to the quieter, more contemplative world of ambient music. And he finds that moment of liberating himself from the beat – not by trying to copy what people would call ambient music on a superficial level, but by fumbling his way to this solution after eliminating obstacles to expression.

Hey, I love both modes of music, myself, so I can appreciate that balance. It’s just rained here in Berlin, and I’m reminded of that feeling of relief when it rains after long periods of sun … and visa versa. Maybe music is the same way.

Have a watch, and I’m sure you’ll want to pick up a guitar or laptop, or go to a beach, or take a personal field trip to the museum and stare at paintings.

Painting with colors in sound … filling the world with oceans of your own expression. What could be more lovely?

Now, an insane amount of beautiful music:

http://www.chihei.org

https://www.discogs.com/artist/440866-Chihei-Hatakeyama

https://chiheihatakeyama.bandcamp.com

The post From Japan, an ambient musician on solitude and views of the sea appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

LCW-2 mono is a complicated little synth for your iPhone

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 11:19 pm

LCW-2 mono comes from the developer of LCW-1, PWM-1, and ToyTone. All of which are quite unique and ‘quirky’ in their own right. Then along comes LCW-2 mono. A synth app specifically for your iPhone, which is, in itself a nice thing to see, as you don’t see that many iPhone only synths these days. I feel like that’s a shame. Like that’s where we started this journey, and now most of what iOS music has become is about the iPad. Which is ok, don’t get me wrong, it’s just that there seems to be less and less specifically iPhone related app ware these days.

Anyway, enough of the rant. More of what LCW-2 mono is about. This is, according to the developer, a “little complicated synthesizer”. Apparently it’s based on ToyTone and implements several experimental functions. Which is absolutely music to my ears (pun intended).

So let’s take a look at LCW-2 mono’s specifications:

Voice

  • 4 channels, Monophonic

DCO

  • Wave form:
  • Sine, Triangular, Sawtooth, Rectangular, Noise

LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator)

  • Wave form:
  • Sine, Triangular, Sawtooth, Rectangular, Noise
  • LFO1 for Voice
  • LFO2 for Delay effect

EG (Envelop Generator)

  • EG1 for Modulation
  • EG2 for Modulation
  • EG3 for AMP/Modulation

Time modulatable delay

  • Time modulatable delay gives effects like Chorus / Flanger.

Signal

  • Signal generator can trigger each voice in combination with a threshold.

Plus LCW-2 mono also supports Inter-App Audio (Generator only).

So, all in all this is a nice little, and yet somewhat complex synth.

LCW-2 mono is free on the app store now

The post LCW-2 mono is a complicated little synth for your iPhone appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Reminder – Quarterly Issues Programs Lists Must Be Placed In Public File Today

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 4:37 pm

Last week, in our calendar of regulatory dates for broadcasters in July, we reminded broadcasters that their Quarterly Issues Programs lists needed to be placed in their public file by today, July 10. This quarterly requirement has been in place for over 30 years, but is still an obligation whose breach has led to more fines in connection with license renewals and FCC inspections than perhaps any other. As the license renewal cycle beings for radio again next June with the filing of renewals by radio stations in 3 states and the District of Columbia, and the renewal cycle begins for TV in 2020, these lists will again be subject to scrutiny by the FCC and other interested parties. With all of these lists now required to be in each full-power station’s online public inspection file, they will also be far easier to check than ever before. We wrote about the importance of these lists here, and urge every broadcaster to make sure that the lists for the past quarter are posted to your online public file by the end of the day today – and that you take seriously your obligation to report in these lists how your stations have addressed in your programming the issues of importance to the communities that you serve.

FCC Lifts Freeze on LPTV and TV Translator Minor Change Applications

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 4:33 pm

Last week, the FCC issued a Public Notice announcing that it was lifting the freeze on minor changes for LPTV and TV translator stations – a freeze that had been in place while the displacement window for stations displaced by the TV incentive auction was taking place (see our articles here and here on that displacement window for LPTV and TV translator stations). Now, with the lifting of the freeze, minor change applications for these stations can be filed. This would allow for applications for changes in these stations, like transmitter site modifications, as long as the proposed facilities protect existing full-power, LPTV and TV translator stations, and applications filed during the displacement window.

Don’t know how to use Ableton Live? These videos can teach you

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 2:00 pm

Just because everyone you talk to may know Ableton Live in and out doesn’t mean you do. Ableton have quietly posted an official series of videos that covers the basics, quickly.

And yeah, it’s actually a bit funny that we’ve gotten to 2018 without an official set of Ableton videos like this. But here we are – and yes, the quality is a lot better than most of what you’ll find online. Paid training products may still do better on going in depth, but … for the essentials, you’d expect Ableton as the developer to come up with something fast, direct, and free, and that’s what you get here.

If you’re not a Live owner, there’s a fully functioning demo version you can try out so you can follow along with these without spending money.

I’m going to guess for some of you readers, this really is your chance to see how Live works – and for others, this will be an easy reference to point to so you don’t have to personally tutor all your friends.

The full playlist is some 59 videos:

But let’s work through some highlights. Note: you do not need white walls and IKEA furniture to use Ableton Live. 😉

First, I know the stumbling block for many people is just getting sound working and hooking up keyboards and controllers, so you can start there:

And there’s the requisite interface tour:

The soul of Ableton Live, and a big clue to its popularity, is Session View. This screen lets you try out ideas by combining loops, samples, and patterns in various combinations, which is useful for exploring musical materials and for live performance.

This also means you should understand warping – mastering this view will help you manipulate audio “The Ableton Way” – and the interface may not be immediately obvious:

Personally, I like using Simpler (a basic sample instrument), because it lets you quickly move to playing sounds, so don’t miss the tutorial about warping inside Simpler:

Session View is what Live is arguably about. But since the beginning, some Live users have stuck to Arrangement View, a more traditional, linear layout. And some even use this view for live performance. Understanding it together with Session View is the main task in getting comfortable with Ableton’s workflow.

Happily, after some years of users demanding the feature, you can use the two side by side. (I have to confess to not doing this as much as I probably should, partly because I got in the habit of switching as an early adopter of the software.)

There’s a lot more in there for you to explore depending on where your interests lie, but let’s highlight some of the Live 10-specific stuff, as well:

New in Live 10

Live 10’s changes to Arrangement View are really most useful if you learn the keyboard shortcuts, which can now allow you to edit ideas more quickly:

It’s also significant that Live 10 added multi-clip editing, which brings Arrangement View pattern editing more in line with some of Live’s competition:

There are a lot of sound capabilities tucked into the new Live 10 devices, but check out some of these in particular:

Oscillator effects in Wavetable are really cool.

Having Echo in Live 10 is a little like having a hybrid-Roland Space Echo toy with you at all times. But the far-out modulation of delay time is where things go wild:

Live 9 and Live 10, but let’s close out with a reminder that you can use Ableton Link to make it easy to sync other software and mobile apps and jam with your friends:

Got more stuff that confuses you? Software or hardware you’d like CDM to help you learn? Let us know.

The post Don’t know how to use Ableton Live? These videos can teach you appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Escape look-alike Ableton Live colors with these free themes

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 1:04 pm

You stare at its interface for hours on end. Why not give your eyes something different to look at? Now Ableton Live 10, too, gets access to custom colors.

Judging by looking over people’s shoulders, a lot of Live users simply don’t know that you can hack into Ableton’s custom theme files and modify things. And so we’re all caught in drab uniformity, with the same color theme – both unoriginal and uninspiring.

Fortunately, we have Berlin native and leading Ableton Live guru and educator Madeleine Bloom to come to our rescue. Madeleine has long made some pleasing variations for Live’s colors. Now she’s got two new sets (with more on the way) for Ableton Live 10. Live 10 can still read your old color modifications, but because of some minor changes to the interface, files made for its new XML-based format will work better. (Ableton also changed the name from “skins” to “themes,” for some reason.)

Free Ableton Live Themes Set #1

Free Ableton Live Themes Set #2 [I spot a naming pattern here]

To install theme, follow this tutorial (for both Live 10 and Live 9 and earlier):

Ableton Live Tutorial: How to install new Skins

And if you think these colors aren’t quite right, Madeleine has also written a tutorial for creating your own themes or making modifications to these:

How to Create Your Own Ableton Live Themes & Free PDF Theming Guide

There’s even a link there to a graphical theme editor for Mac and Windows with previews, in case you don’t like editing XML files.

“But, Peter!” says you, “you’re just now a paid shill for Ableton, trying to force me to upgrade to Live 10 when I don’t need it!”

Why, you’ve just made me spit out some of this lifetime supply of Club-Mate soda that Ableton has delivered to my flat every day, you ungrateful readers! Of course, I can’t imagine why you wouldn’t upgrade to Live 10 — why, it’s The Future of Sound. Oh… wait, actually, that’s Native Instruments’ slogan. Sometimes I forget who I’m shilling for.

Anyway, if you are stuck on the clearly inferior and not-having-an-Echo effect Live 9 or earlier, Madeleine is nice enough to have you covered, too, with a whole bunch of skins for those versions. There are dozens of those, including various from readers:

https://sonicbloom.net/en/?s=ableton+live+skins&submit=Search

And there’s an accompanying guide to making your own skins, as well.

Now, enjoy. I have to go lie down, as I think all this Club-Mate sponsorship has made me feel a bit lightheaded.

You’ll find a ton of resources for Live at Sonic Bloom, the site Madeleine runs. It’s a complete hub for information, which is way better than trying to navigate random YouTube uploads:

https://sonicbloom.net/en/

The post Escape look-alike Ableton Live colors with these free themes appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

50 great tracks for July from Drake, Ebony Bones, Low and more

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Tue 10 Jul 2018 10:58 am

From Nicki Minaj’s sex chat to Blawan’s masterful minimal techno, here are 50 great new tracks from across the musical spectrum. Read about our favourite 10 and subscribe to the playlist

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