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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » March » 01


Take a 3D trip into experimental turntablism with V-A-C Moscow, Shiva Feshareki

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 9:17 pm

Complex music conjures up radical, fluid architectures, vivid angles – why not experience those spatial and rhythmic structures together? Here’s insight into a music video this week in which experimental turntablism and 3D graphics collide.

And collide is the right word. Sound and image are all hard edges, primitive cuts, stimulating corners.

Shiva Feshareki is a London-born composer and turntablist; she’s also got a radio show on NTS. With a research specialization in Daphne Oram (there’s a whole story there, even), she’s made a name for herself as one of the world’s leading composers working with turntables as medium, playing to the likes of the Royaal Albert Hall with the London Contemporary Orchestra. Her sounds are themselves often spatial and architectural, too – not just taking over art spaces, but working with spatial organization in her compositions.

That makes a perfect fit with the equally frenetic jump cuts and spinning 3D architectures of visualist Daniel James Oliver Haddock. (He’s a man with so many dimensions they named him four times over.)

NEW FORMS, her album on Belfast’s Resist label, explores the fragmented world of “different social forms,” a cut-up analog to today’s sliced-up, broken society. The abstract formal architecture, then, has a mission. As she writes in the liner notes: “if I can demonstrate sonically how one form can be vastly transformed using nothing other than its own material, then I can demonstrate this complexity and vastness of perspective.”

You can watch her playing with turntables and things around and atop turntables on Against the Clock for FACT:

And grab the album from Bandcamp:

Shiva herself works with graphical scores, which are interpreted in the album art by artist Helena Hamilton. Have a gander at that edition:

But since FACT covered the sound side of this, I decided to snag Daniel James Oliver Haddock. Daniel also wins the award this week for “quickest to answer interview questions,” so hey kids, experimental turntablism will give you energy!

Here’s Daniel:

The conception formed out of conversations with Shiva about the nature of her work and the ways in which she approaches sound. She views sound as these unique 3D structures which can change and be manipulated. So I wanted to emulate that in the video. I also was interested in the drawings and diagrams that she makes to plan out different aspects of her performances, mapping out speakers and sound scapes, I thought they were really beautiful in a very clinical way so again I wanted to use them as a staging point for the 3D environments.

I made about 6 environments in cinema 4d which were all inspired by these drawings. Then animated these quite rudimentary irregular polyhedrons in the middle to kind of represent various sounds.

Her work usually has a lot of sound manipulation, so I wanted the shapes to change and have variables. I ended up rendering short scenes in different camera perspectives and movements and also changing the textures from monotone to colour.

After all the Cinema 4d stuff, it was just a case of editing it all together! Which was fairly labour intensive, the track is not only very long but all the sounds have a very unusual tempo to them, some growing over time and then shortening, sounds change and get re-manipulated so that was challenging getting everything cut well. I basically just went through second by second with the waveforms and matched sounds by eye. Once I got the technique down it moved quite quickly. I then got the idea to involve some found footage to kind of break apart the aesthetic a bit.

Of course, there’s a clear link here to Autechre’s Gantz Graf music video, ur-video of all 3D music videos after. But then, there’s something really delightful about seeing those rhythms visualized when they’re produced live on turntables. Just the VJ in me really wants to see the visuals as live performance. (Well, and to me, that’s easier to produce than the Cinema 4D edits!)

But it’s all a real good time with at the audio/visual synesthesia experimental disco.

More:

Watch experimental turntablist Shiva Feshareki’s ‘V-A-C Moscow’ video [FACT]

https://www.shivafeshareki.co.uk/

https://resistbelfast.bandcamp.com/album/new-forms

Resist label

The post Take a 3D trip into experimental turntablism with V-A-C Moscow, Shiva Feshareki appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

LOST LANDS TICKETS ARE ON SALE!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 9:00 pm
Lost Lands is the continuation of of the music festival created by Excision, aka Jeff Abel. You can expect a lineup of bass-heavy electronic music, including dubstep, trap, drum and bass, house, techno and more!

BRING ME THE HORIZON, ROLLING BLACKOUTS COASTAL FEVER, XENOBLIGHT AND MORE ADDED TO ROSKILDE FESTIVAL

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 8:20 pm
spaceLAB/theSHOW/MusicFestivals/Roskilde-Festival-2019-Lineup-Tickets-Dates.html

LIL UZI VERT, BAD BUNNY, DAITO MANABE, DJ KRUSH AND MORE ADDED TO SONAR BARCELONA LINEUP

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 8:00 pm
Sónar Barcelona is a mashup of music and film and video, all rolled into one big multimedia festival. You get a lineup of installation art, audiovisual concerts, and media lab presentations next to DJ sets, electronic music, film and more!

Do TV Program Ratings Do a Good Job Telling Families Which Programs are Appropriate for Kids to Watch? Congress Wants to Know, So the FCC is Asking

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 5:44 pm

The FCC this week launched an inquiry into whether the TV Parental Guidelines and the organization that oversees these ratings provide accurate information to viewers as to which TV programs are appropriate for children. The FCC released a Public Notice to initiate the inquiry at the direction of Congress in the recently passed Consolidated Appropriations Bill – the Bill which ended the threat of a second government shutdown. That Bill contained a number of provisions directing various government agencies to take specific actions, including a direction to the FCC to provide a report to Congress in 90 days on the “extent to which the rating system matches the video content that is being shown” and whether the TV Parental Guidelines Oversight Monitoring Board (which oversees the ratings system) has the ability to address public concerns about the ratings. With the report due to be submitted to Congress by May 15, the FCC has asked for public comment on an expedited basis, with comments due March 12, and replies due just a week later on March 19.

The Board was established by a voluntary industry initiative approved by the FCC following a Congressional mandate for V-Chip technology in the Telecommunications Act of 1996. For the V-Chip to work, programs have to be rated. The ratings that resulted are familiar to most TV viewers and range from TV-Y programming appropriate for all children to TV-MA, appropriate only for mature audiences. Programs are also rated for Violence (“V”), Fantasy Violence in programming for older children (“FV”), Sexual Content (“S”), Suggestive Dialogue (“D”) and Strong Language (“L”). These ratings are applied to most TV and cable programming except news, sports, and ads. Based on the claims by interest groups that the ratings do not accurately describe the programming, Congress issued this directive to the FCC. What questions does the FCC ask in its request for comments from the public?

The FCC seeks comment on numerous questions, including:

  • Whether the Board has done a good job responding to public input;
  • Whether the Board has improved the accuracy of the ratings over time;
  • Whether all of the programming that the industry committed to rate is in fact being rated;
  • Has the Board taken steps to enforce the ratings commitments from the industry;
  • Are programs being accurately rated and the standards for content ratings correctly applied;
  • Are the ratings being applied consistently; and
  • Are there any particular types of content that are more likely to be rated inaccurately.

While this Public Notice does not propose any specific action, in theory, were the Report to conclude that there were problems with the current system, follow up proceedings by the FCC or action by Congress to remedy perceived issues could follow. If you have comments on the system, follow the directions in the Public Notice to contribute to the discussion – and watch for the report generated based on these comments which is expected in May.

The Japanese House: Good at Falling review – candid breakup pop lets the air in

Delivered... Michael Cragg | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 10:00 am

(Dirty Hit)

The evolution of The Japanese House has been a lesson in slowly peeling back the layers. The musical moniker of Buckinghamshire-born Amber Bain (the name inspired by a childhood holiday home once owned by Kate Winslet) was part of a concerted attempt to use generalities as opposed to specifics. That also meant there were no press pictures to accompany her early EPs of skittering electronic hymnals, while her voice was often buried beneath ghostly, often androgynous effects. On Good at Falling, her debut album, the walls come tumbling down, with Bain picking at the scabs of a broken relationship with the sort of direct candour that would have seemed unimaginable when she arrived in 2015.

Fuelled by this emotional blood-letting, plus extensive touring with label-mates Wolf Alice and the 1975 (the latter’s George Daniel also co-produced the album), Good at Falling also sees Bain opening up her sound. While those early EPs seemed almost hermetically sealed, here Bain lets some air in. She skips unadorned around the lovely acoustic strums of You Seemed So Happy, and channels 70s MOR on the yearning Faraway, while the stately pop of Lilo – so specifically about the dissolution of her relationship with fellow singer-songwriter Marika Hackman that their breakup is re-created in the accompanying video – feels like a refreshing splash of cold water on tear-stained cheeks. Even when the lyrics are mired in sadness – “I think I’m dying, because this can’t be living” Bain sighs, on the Chvrches-esque Maybe You’re the Reason – there’s a laser-guided focus that keeps things from imploding.

Continue reading...

Azure Kinect promises new motion, tracking for art

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 1 Mar 2019 12:01 am

Gamers’ interest may come and go, but artists are always exploring the potential of computer vision for expression. Microsoft this month has resurrected the Kinect, albeit in pricey, limited form. Let’s fit it to the family tree.

Time flies: musicians and electronic artists have now had access to readily available computer vision since the turn of this century. That initially looked like webcams, paired with libraries like the free OpenCV (still a viable option), and later repurposed gaming devices from Sony and Microsoft platforms.

And then came Kinect. Kinect was a darling of live visual projects and art installations, because of its relatively sophisticated skeletal tracking and various artist-friendly developer tools.

History time

A full ten years ago, I was writing about the Microsoft project and interactions, in its first iteration as the pre-release Project Natal. Xbox 360 support followed in 2010, Windows support in 2012 – while digital artists quickly hacked in Mac (and rudimentary Linux) support. An artists in music an digital media quickly followed.

For those of you just joining us, Kinect shines infrared light at a scene, and takes an infrared image (so it can work irrespective of other lighting) which it converts into a 3D depth map of the scene. From that depth image, Microsoft’s software can also track the skeleton image of one or two people, which lets you respond to the movement of bodies. Microsoft and partner PrimeSense weren’t the only to try this scheme, but they were the ones to ship the most units and attract the most developers.

We’re now on the third major revision of the camera hardware.

2010: Original Kinect for Xbox 360. The original. Proprietary connector with breakout to USB and power. These devices are far more common, as they were cheaper and shipped more widely. Despite the name, they do work with both open drivers for respective desktop systems.

2012: Kinect for Windows. Looks and works almost identically to Kinect for 360, with some minor differences (near mode).

Raw use of depth maps and the like for the above yielded countless music videos, and the skeletal tracking even more numerous and typically awkward “wave your hands around to play the music” examples.

Here’s me with a quick demo for the TED organization, preceded by some discussion of why I think gesture matter. It’s… slightly embarrassing, only in that it was produced on an extremely tight schedule, and I think the creative exploration of what I was saying about gesture just wasn’t ready yet. (Not only had I not quite caught up, but camera tech like what Microsoft is shipping this year is far better suited to the task than the original Kinect camera was.) But the points I’m making here have some fresh meaning for me now.

2013: Kinect for Xbox One. Here’s where things got more interesting – because of a major hardware upgrade, these cameras are far more effective at tracking and yield greater performance.

  • Active IR tracking in the dark
  • Wider field of vision
  • 6 skeletons (people) instead of two
  • More tracking features, with additional joints and creepier features like heart rate and facial expression
  • 1080p color camera
  • Faster performance/throughput (which was key to more expressive results)

Kinect One, the second camera (confusing!), definitely allowed more expressive applications. One high point for me was the simple but utterly effective work of Chris Milk and team, “The Treachery of Sanctuary.”

And then it ended. Microsoft unbundled the camera from Xbox One, meaning developers couldn’t count on gamers owning the hardware, and quietly discontinued the last camera at the end of October 2017.

Everything old is new again

I have mixed feelings – as I’m sure you do – about these cameras, even with the later results on Kinect One. For gaming, the devices were abandoned – by gamers, by developers, and by Microsoft as the company ditched the Xbox strategy. (Parallel work at Sony didn’t fare much better.)

It’s hard to keep up with consumer expectations. By implying “computer vision,” any such technology has to compete with your own brain – and your own brain is really, really, really good. “Sensors” and “computation” are all merged in organic harmony, allowing you to rapidly detect the tiniest nuance. You can read a poker player’s tell in an instant, while Kinect will lose the ability to recognize that your leg is attached to your body. Microsoft launched Project Natal talking about seeing a ball and kicking a ball, but… you can do that with a real ball, and you really can’t do that with a camera, so they quite literally got off on the wrong foot.

It’s not just gaming, either. On the art side, the very potential of these cameras to make the same demos over and over again – yet another magic mirror – might well be their downfall.

So why am I even bothering to write this?

Simple: the existing, state-of-the-art Kinect One camera is now available on the used market for well under a hundred bucks – for less than the cost of a mid-range computer mouse. Microsoft’s gaming business whims are your budget buy. The computers to process that data are faster and cheaper. And the software is more mature.

So while digital art has long been driven by novelty … who cares? Actual music and art making requires practice and maturity of both tools and artist. It takes time. So oddly while creative specialists were ahead of the curve on these sorts of devices, the same communities might well innovate in the lagging cycle of the same technology.

And oh yeah – the next generation looks very powerful.

Kinect: The Next Generation

Let’s get the bad news out of the way first: the new Kinect is both more expensive ($400) and less available (launching only in the US and China… in June). Ugh. And that continues Microsoft’s trend here of starting with general purpose hardware for mass audiences and working up to … wait, working up to increasingly expensive hardware for smaller and smaller groups of developers.

That is definitely backwards from how this is normally meant to work.

But the good news here is unexpected. Kinect was lost, and now is found.

The safe bet was that Microsoft would just abandon Kinect after the gaming failure. But to the company’s credit, they’ve pressed on, with some clear interest in letting developers, researchers, and artists decide what this thing is really for. Smart move: those folks often come up with inspiration that doesn’t fit the demands of the gaming industry.

So now Kinect is back, dubbed Azure Kinect – Microsoft is also hell-bent on turning Azure “cloud services” into a catch-all solution for all things, everywhere.

And the hardware looks … well, kind of amazing. It might be described as a first post-smartphone device. Say what? Well, now that smartphones have largely finalized their sensing capabilities, they’ve oddly left the arena open to other tech defining new areas.

For a really good write-up, you’ll want to read this great run-down:


All you need to know on Azure Kinect
[The Ghost Howls, a VR/tech blog, see also a detailed run-down of HoloLens 2 which also just came out]

Here are the highlights, though. Azure Kinect is the child of Kinect and HoloLens. It’s a VR-era sensor, but standalone – which is perfect for performance and art.

Fundamentally, the formula is the same – depth camera, conventional RGB camera, some microphones, additional sensors. But now you get more sensing capabilities and substantially beefed-up image processing.

1MP depth camera (not 640×480) – straight off of HoloLens 2, Microsoft’s augmented reality plaform
Two modes: wide and narrow field of view
4K RGB camera (with standard USB camera operation)
7 microphone array
Gyroscope + accelerometer

And it connects both by USB-C (which can also be used for power) or as a standalone camera with “cloud connection.” (You know, I’m pretty sure that means it has a wifi radio, but oddly all the tech reporters who talked to Microsoft bought the “cloud” buzzword and no one says outright. I’ll double-check.)

Also, now Microsoft supports both Windows and Linux. (Ubuntu 18.04 + OpenGL v 4.4).

Downers: 30 fps operation, limited range.

Somehing something, hospitals or assembly lines Azure services, something that looks like an IBM / Cisco ad:

That in itself is interesting. Artists using the same thing as gamers sort of … didn’t work well. But artists using the same tool as an assembly line is something new.

And here’s the best part for live performance and interaction design – you can freely combine as many cameras as you want, and sync them without any weird tricks.

All in all, this looks like it might be the best networked camera, full stop, let alone best for tracking, depth sensing, and other applications. And Microsoft are planning special SDKs for the sensor, body tracking, vision, and speech.

Also, the fact that it doesn’t plug into an Xbox is a feature, not a bug to me – it means Microsoft are finally focusing on the more innovative, experimental uses of these cameras.

So don’t write off Kinect now. In fact, with Kinect One so cheap, it might be worth picking one up and trying Microsoft’s own SDK just for practice.

Azure Kinect DK preorder / product page

aka.ms/kinectdocs

For more on this, if you’re in Berlin, Stanislav Glazov and Valentin Tszin will show how they connect computer vision (using Kinect) as a link between choreography and music. They also recently explored these fields with techno legend Dasha Rush at CTM Festival.

Workshop:Singularity+Performance w/StanislavGlazov,ValentinTszin [Facebook]

The post Azure Kinect promises new motion, tracking for art appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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