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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » March » 06


SOMA’s Ether is a high-sensitivity ear for your electromagnetic world

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 6:48 pm

Electronics are redefining what “sound” means – by remapping other signals into our audible spectrum. The latest is SOMA’s invention Ether, a “microphone” for electromagnetic fields. If that sounds familiar, this one’s a bit different than some EMF devices that came before.

Here’s a look at the new Ether. It’s a new creation from SOMA Laboratory, the same Russian instrument builder who have give us the gorgeous “organismic” LYRA synths. (I covered them in the Russian Synthposium write-up last year.)

First, let’s talk electromagnetic fields. Just like gravity, these fields extend throughout nature. Since we have electricity and electrically-charged stuff pulsing all around us, there’s a lot happening in the electromagnetic field. But we can’t perceive that, because our bodies lack sense organs equipped to do so – well, until now, that is. Now we’ve invented devices that translate to things we can sense. Think of it as expanded sensory perception for the transhumanist, technologically augmented age.

Various artists have built electromagnetic detectors that you can use for music – both by listening directly with headphones, and by letting you plug that signal into a recorder or use in live performance. That includes the superb ElecktroSluch by LOM Label and artist Jonáš Gruska, who both makes these instruments available and has built a body of works around them on his label (both by him and invited artists).

Latest microphones unlock an unheard world

https://lom.audio/instruments/elektrosluch/

Part of what makes Jonáš special, though, is his interest in delicate sounds and focused sounds – that’s something he applies to his acoustic microphones, as well.

So here’s where the SOMA Ether becomes interesting.

The invention of engineer Vlad Kreimer, the Ether is a portable EMF device. But it’s much more sensitive than other offerings – making it well suited to picking up larger ambiences in recording or live performances. It works on a slightly different technique, and yields different results.

Vlad himself sends along an explanation to make this clearer:

ETHER is not just an inductive sniffer like some projects you can easily find online. A simple low-frequency inductive sniffer will be silent in most places that are full of sounds in the video. Such devices need to be placed close to an emitting source and will not work on a street. All they contain is a coil and a low-frequency amplifier. In comparison, ETHER has a regenerating circuit and a demodulator, making it an actual radio wave receiver, not just an amplifier of low-frequency magnetic fields. However, ETHER can perceive the low-frequency magnetic fields as well. But, honestly, if your goal is to scan objects in close proximity (0-20 centimetres), devices like Elektrosluch will work cleaner and more focused due to its narrow band and lower sensitivity. ETHER was designed to be a part of your walks in the city and may even pick up sounds in a forest or at the seashore (I have such experience). Elektrosluch was designed for using over a table full of gear. Also, ETHER can perceive the electric component of the radiation as well, capturing radiation that is far above the audio range and is much more sensitive. Therefore, it has a significantly different design, functions and implementation than a simple inductive sniffer even if in some cases their functions can overlap.

Devoted EMF fans I can imagine carrying both the Ether and something like an ElectroSluch to capture different sounds, a bit like photographers carry multiple lenses. (Oh yes – this addiction is about to run deep. Or you can think about the difference between a double bass and an oboe.)

As you can hear in the demo, you get these sweeping, overlapping waves of EMF with some really fantastic distortion – punk electromagnetism.

120 EUR, available to order now. (VAT and shipping are additional.)

https://somasynths.com/ether/

The post SOMA’s Ether is a high-sensitivity ear for your electromagnetic world appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

How to make a multitrack recording in VCV Rack modular, free

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 6:00 pm

In the original modular synth era, your only way to capture ideas was to record to tape. But that same approach can be liberating even in the digital age – and it’s a perfect match for the open VCV Rack software modular platform.

Competing modular environments like Reaktor, Softube Modular, and Cherry Audio Voltage Modular all run well as plug-ins. That functionality is coming soon to a VCV Rack update, too – see my recent write-up on that. In the meanwhile, VCV Rack is already capable of routing audio into a DAW or multitrack recorder – via the existing (though soon-to-be-deprecated) VST Bridge, or via inter-app routing schemes on each OS, including JACK.

Those are all good solutions, so why would you bother with a module inside the rack?

Well, for one, there’s workflow. There’s something nice about being able to just keep this record module handy and grab a weird sound or nice groove at will, without having to shift to another tool.

Two, the big ongoing disadvantage of software modular is that it’s still pretty CPU intensive – sometimes unpredictably so. Running Rack standalone means you don’t have to worry about overhead from the host, or its audio driver settings, or anything like that.

A free recording solution inside VCV Rack

What you’ll need to make this work is the free NYSTHI modules for VCV Rack, available via Rack’s plug-in manager. They’re free, though – get ready, there’s a hell of a lot of them.

Type “recorder” into the search box for modules, and you’ll see different options options from NYSTHI – current at least as of this writing.

2 Channel MasterRecorder is a simple stereo recorder.
2 Channel MasterReocorder 2 adds various features: monitoring outs, autosave, a compressor, and “stereo massaging.”
Multitrack Recorder is an multitrack recorder with 4- or 8-channel modes.

The multitrack is the one I use the most. It allows you to create stems you can then mix in another host, or turn into samples (or, say, load onto a drum machine or the like), making this a great sound design tool and sound starter.

This is creatively liberating for the same reason it’s actually fun to have a multitrack tape recorder in the same studio as a modular, speaking of vintage gear. You can muck about with knobs, find something magical, and record it – and then not worry about going on to do something else later.

The AS mixer, routed into NYSTHI’s multitrack recorder.

Set up your mix. The free included Fundamental modules in Rack will cover the basics, but I would also go download Alfredo Santamaria’s excellent selection , the AS modules, also in the Plugin Manager, and also free. Alfredo has created friendly, easy-to-use 2-, 4-, and 8-channel mixers that pair perfectly with the NYSTHI recorders.

Add the mixer, route your various parts, set level (maybe with some temporary panning), and route the output of the mixer to the Audio device for monitoring. Then use the ‘O’ row to get a post-fader output with the level.

Configure the recorder. Right-click on the recorder for an option to set 24-bit audio if you want more headroom, or to pre-select a destination. Set 4- or 8-track mode with the switch. Set CHOOSE FILE if you want to manually select where to record.

There are trigger ins and outs, too, so apart from just pressing the START and STOP buttons, you can either trigger a sequencer or clock directly from the recorder, or visa versa.

Record away! And go to town… when you’re done, you’ll get a stereo WAV file, or a 4- or 8-track WAV file. Yes, that’s one file with all the tracks. So about that…

Splitting up the multitrack file

This module produces a single, multichannel WAV file. Some software will know what to do with that. Reaper, for instance, has excellent multichannel support throughout, so you can just drag and drop into it. Adobe’s Audition CS also opens these files, but it can’t quickly export all the stems.

Software like Ableton Live, meanwhile, will just throw up an error if you try to open the file. (Bad Ableton! No!)

It’s useful to have individual stems anyway. ffmpeg is an insanely powerful cross-platform tool capable of doing all kinds of things with media. It’s completely free and open source, it runs on every platform, and it’s fast and deep. (It converts! It streams! It records!)

Installing is easier than it used to be, thanks to a cleaned-up site and pre-built binaries for Mac and Windows (plus of course the usual easy Linux installs):

https://ffmpeg.org/

Unfortunately, it’s so deep and powerful, it can also be confusing to figure out how to do something. Case in point – this audio channel manipulation wiki page.

In this case, you can use the map channel “filter” to make this happen. So for eight channels, I do this:

ffmpeg -i input.wav -map_channel 0.0.0 0.wav -map_channel 0.0.1 1.wav -map_channel 0.0.2 2.wav -map_channel 0.0.3 3.wav -map_channel 0.0.4 4.wav -map_channel 0.0.5 5.wav -map_channel 0.0.6 6.wav -map_channel 0.0.7 7.wav

But because this is a command line tool, you could create some powerful automated workflows for your modular outputs now that you know this technique.

Sound Devices, the folks who make excellent multichannel recorders, also have a free Mac and Windows tool called Wave Agent which handles this task if you want a GUI instead of the command line.

https://www.sounddevices.com/products/accessories/software/wave-agent

That’s worth keeping around, too, since it can also mix and monitor your output. (No Linux version, though.)

Record away!

I really like this way of working, in that it lets you focus on the modular environment instead of juggling tools. I actually hope we’ll see a Fundamental module for the task in the future. Rack’s modular ecosystem changes fast, so if you find other useful recorders, let us know.

https://vcvrack.com/

The post How to make a multitrack recording in VCV Rack modular, free appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE CAMP BISCO LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 6:00 pm
The Disco Biscuits, Bassnectar, Odesza and Tipper headline! STS9, Umphrey's McGee, Ganja White Night, Liquid Snails, Space Jesus + Friends also top the lineup!

An Artificial Intelligence Made These 231 Fake DJ Names By Analyzing Hard Wax’s Web Shop

Delivered... Derek Opperman | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 4:04 pm

The post An Artificial Intelligence Made These 231 Fake DJ Names By Analyzing Hard Wax’s Web Shop appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

‘Blackness will never go away’: how Solange takes pride in her roots

Delivered... Britt Julious | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 3:47 pm

At an immersive, city-wide multimedia presentation of her new album When I Get Home, the singer-songwriter explains how her childhood home of Houston nourished her creative spirit

‘It’s one thing to think with your spirit,” says Solange Knowles. “It’s another to actually live it through your body.” The Solange of today works with feelings, grooves, and frequencies in mind. If A Seat at the Table, her breakthrough third album, was a lyrically dense record about the complexities and struggles of the black American experience, then When I Get Home, her latest release, is the sonic manifestation of that blackness. Staccato rhythms and meditative mantras – designed to ground and heal her after time on the road – ripple on through the bodies of her listeners. It’s an album about settling into familiarity: with yourself, the people around you, and the places one calls home.

At the SHAPE community center in the third ward of Houston last Sunday evening, the record comes to life during a screening of a film, also entitled When I Get Home, that Solange created and directed to accompany the album. Despite the celebrities in attendance, this isn’t a premiere. The album arrived days before, with the film launching simultaneously on Apple Music and the recently revived, early-internet social network Black Planet. Instead, it is a celebration of her return to her roots.

Thank you to alll of uuuu! I’m coming up for air and overwhelmed with gratitude for all the love U sharing. Thank you for always giving me the space to expand and evolve and express. For constantly opening up my world, and allowing me to show you my own new ones. I express for survival, for breath. This shit gave me so much joy to make! I wasn’t afraid. My body wasn’t either, even at times of uncertainty. I love and appreciate u guys infinitely. You make me feel safe and held even in this big big strange world. I can’t thank you enough. It’s been hard to answer where home is, hard to know if it’s past or future...this album and film is one stream of thought and reflection into answering that. I thank you for your time and energy experiencing it with meee. So much love!

my Sol-Angel... no one talk to me ever again

I’ll always be a black woman, and I’ll always create work from this black woman’s body

Related: Solange: When I Get Home review – lose yourself in Knowles' hazy vision

Continue reading...

March Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – Preparing for License Renewal Tops the List

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 1:30 pm

March is one of those unusual months in the broadcast regulatory cycle, where there are no routine EEO public file obligations, and no quarterly filing obligations or other regularly scheduled regulatory deadlines.  That means that my tardiness in publishing this article before the start of the month did not miss anything important.  But, starting next month, there will be a whole new set of deadlines about which broadcasters need to be concerned, as April 1 is when the first pre-filing announcements for broadcast license renewals will begin, signaling the start of the 3-year long radio renewal cycle. The 3-year TV license renewal cycle will begin at the same time next year.

Radio broadcasters in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia will be the first to file their renewal applications – and they will need to start running their “pre-filing” notices on their radio stations beginning on April 1, in anticipation of a June renewal filing (renewal applications to be filed no later than June 3, as June 1 is a Saturday).  The FCC has posted a helpful guide to the times that these notices need to run, and a model for the text of these notices, here (although the model text is now outdated, in that it does not acknowledge that stations now have online public files; the FCC has a pending proceeding to modify these public notices that one would hope would be resolved soon – see our articles here and here for details).  Stations in the Carolinas begin their pre-filing announcements two months later, with stations in other states to follow at 2-month intervals after that.  The schedule for renewals is on the FCC website here, and the pre-filing announcements begin two months before the renewal-filing deadline.

The upcoming renewal deadlines should also remind broadcasters of the importance of maintaining their public inspection files.  As we wrote here, as that file is now online, the FCC will review the contents of the file in connection with the renewal, and likely will penalize stations that have not been timely with their uploads to the online file, or that make certifications in their renewal application that are inconsistent with the information in the public file.  Quarterly Issues Programs lists, as we wrote here, are particularly important, as they demonstrate how a station has served the needs and interests of its community.  On April 10, the next set of Quarterly Issues Programs lists will be due in the public file, so stations should be spending this month getting ready to upload them in April.

But March is not totally without deadlines and regulatory dates of interest.  Comments are due in the FCC proceeding to review the ratings for TV programs to assess whether they provide adequate information to allow parents to assess a program’s suitability for children, and whether the administrator for that ratings system has done an adequate job in responding to suggestions and comments on the ratings system to make sure that they remain up to date.  As we wrote here in summarizing this proceeding, comments are due March 12, with reply comments due a week later, on March 19.

Comments are due on March 18 on the joint proposal from the NAB and NCTA to set standard procedures for broadcast stations to give notice to cable systems about their retransmission consent elections.  The FCC Public Notice on the request for comments is available here.  Reply comments in that proceeding are due on March 26.

As we wrote here, the March FCC meeting, to be held on March 15, also contains two issues of importance to broadcasters.  One is an item to simplify the sale of full-power TV stations that are considered to be satellites of other full-power TV stations.  The other item, which probably has wider importance, is the FCC’s proposed rules for the reimbursement of LPTV stations, TV translators, and FM stations which were affected by the repacking of the TV band following the incentive auction.

Other deadlines to keep in mind include the expiration of the current interim license between GMR and radio operators while the litigation over whether GMR should be subject to antitrust rules goes on.  See our post here for more details.  The latest FCC EEO audit also has an April 1 response deadline, for stations caught up in that review.  See our article here.

For a month with few routine regulatory deadlines, it turns out that March is pretty busy.  As always, consult with your own counsel for other deadlines that we may not have included in these highlights, and or anything that is applicable to your own operations. And consult our Broadcasters’ Calendar for other regulatory dates of importance for 2019.

THE LIGHTNING IN A BOTTLE PHASE TWO LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 12:00 am
It's created by The Do Lab as both a music and sustainability festival in Buena Vista Valley, California. Check out electronic music, yoga, art and workshops.

THE VELD MUSIC FESTIVAL AFTERMOVIE HAS DROPPED

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 12:00 am
The festival features a lineup of electronic dance music and hip-hop from Ink Entertainment.

THE EDC JAPAN LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 12:00 am
Alison Wonderland, Armin Van Buuren, Excision, Joyryde, KSHMR and Mija all top the list!

ILLFEST LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 12:00 am
Seven Lions headlines! Deorro, Gramatik and G Jones also top the lineup!

THE BENICASSIM FESTIVAL PHASE TWO LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 6 Mar 2019 12:00 am
New additions include Fatboy Slim, Kodaline, Octavian, Gerry Cinnamon, The Blinders and more!
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