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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » May » 13


Polyend puts presets in your modular – plus run on a battery, anywhere

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 6:09 pm

Hey, modulars are great. But you can’t call up presets at will, like on a computer. And you can’t head for a day of patching to the shore of your local lake. Or – can you? The folks at Polish maker Polyend are breaking the rules.

I think these are devilishly clever ideas – and there’s certainly some devilishly clever marketing.

Centralized encoders, grids for saving and recall, sequenced presets, an LFO, gesture recording – this unit does a lot.

Presets on a modular

First up: Polyend Preset. Okay, it’s not quite preset storage for your modular – you can’t sample the voltage level of other patch cords, so you’re going to have to remember some of how you patched together a sound. But Polyend have made a matrix of knobs and pads that gives you full nine different outputs. The encoders have variable RGB lighting for UI feedback and for checking values, and that’s paired with Polyend’s signature pads. It all looks ideal for live performance.

Here’s the workflow: you consolidate the parameters you want to control, save, and recall on Polyend’s own module. That gives you a centralized command station for tweaking all the rest of your modular rig. You have 9 CV outs – one of which is also an LFO. And you can restore and recall values. You could use that to save particular sounds as you’re working, or to set up a setlist of patches to play live. Or you could also ‘play’ those different values from the pads, or even sequence them (internally, or driven by external CV).

You choose continuous CV, scaled musical pitches, gate, or on the ninth encoder, LFO. Specs:

9 CV outs
1V/Oct, 0-10V, or gate output
32 onboard musical scales
Phrase automation – record and send out voltage changes – each output has up to 30 seconds recording
Instant preset recall (so you can play the grid, too)
Sequence from external gate / 0-10V

Hey readers – does anyone remember an April Fools joke about a year ago that featured ‘preset storing’ patch cables? It was a funny idea, even if it was obviously a joke. Looked for the video and couldn’t find it. And this is… kinda sorta that.

Okay, summertime, looks like we’ll have some modular in the park. Everything is running off that little power bank you see with the USB cable popping out of it.

Into the woods

Polyed Anywhere is also great stuff – it’s a simple power supply module with a USB input, to which you can connect a 20,000 mAh battery for modular busking, open air synthing, seaside noodling, whatever. (They were using this at the show.)

Future shot some video of these two together:

And a new Poly

Poly 2 is the latest version of their MIDI to CV converter. Trigger 8 voices, use Gate, V/Oct or Hz/V for pitch that works with anything, velocity, CC, and clock – and now it’s also got Smart Thru for daisy chaining, more onboard musical scales, and crucially, MPE compatibility. This isn’t the only game in town – we need some comparison to offerings from Expert Sleepers and Bastl – but it’s certainly one of the more capable.

I’m still most excited about Polyend’s desktop polysynth, though, not modular – stay tuned for that review this week, as Medusa holds up nicely even against the latest polysynths revealed this week.

No updates on the Polyend site as I write this, but check them out:

http://polyend.com

The post Polyend puts presets in your modular – plus run on a battery, anywhere appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Video Looking at the Basics of the Online Public Inspection File and Quarterly Issues Programs Lists

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 5:20 pm

Looking for a brief explanation of the online public inspection file and Quarterly Issues Programs List, and how they will be viewed in connection with the upcoming license renewal cycle – including the potential fines for violations of the rules? The Indiana Broadcasters has just released this video of me discussing those issues available here.

We have written in more depth about these issues, including our discussion of the importance of the online public file for the renewal process (here and here), the importance of Quarterly Issues Programs lists (here) and the required content of the online public file (here and here). With the license renewal filing process starting for radio stations in June (see the schedule of filing for stations, which is done on a state by state basis, here) and for TV a year later, these obligations, while basic, are very important. So if you have questions about these issues, check out these resources, and contact your own legal advisor for more information.

‘We’re not beard-strokers!’ Wigflex, Nottingham’s ‘rudeboy techno’ night

Delivered... Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 3:47 pm

With its hotchpotch of electro, breakbeat and garage, Wigflex has become a beacon in Nottingham where ‘there’s not loads of things to do, so people come and forget their troubles’

When soulful singer-songwriter Yazmin Lacey first met Lukas Cole, AKA Lukas Wigflex, she told him his party didn’t sound appealing. “He’s like, ‘Yeah come down!’ And I told him I wasn’t really into that kind of music,” she says. “There’s not a lot of people I know running nights that would stand there at a house party and take that on the chin.”

Accepting a free ticket anyway, Lacey put her theory to the test, and lost. Still not always sold on techno, she’s now a Wigflex regular, lured on to the dancefloor by the open attitude and lack of black-clad affectation Nottingham’s most respected nocturnal session is known for.

Related: 10 of the best city music festivals in the UK for 2019

Continue reading...

‘We’re not beard-strokers!’ Wigflex, Nottingham’s ‘rudeboy techno’ night

Delivered... Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 3:47 pm

With its hotchpotch of electro, breakbeat and garage, Wigflex has become a beacon in Nottingham where ‘there’s not loads of things to do, so people come and forget their troubles’

When soulful singer-songwriter Yazmin Lacey first met Lukas Cole, AKA Lukas Wigflex, she told him his party didn’t sound appealing. “He’s like, ‘Yeah come down!’ And I told him I wasn’t really into that kind of music,” she says. “There’s not a lot of people I know running nights that would stand there at a house party and take that on the chin.”

Accepting a free ticket anyway, Lacey put her theory to the test, and lost. Still not always sold on techno, she’s now a Wigflex regular, lured on to the dancefloor by the open attitude and lack of black-clad affectation Nottingham’s most respected nocturnal session is known for.

Related: 10 of the best city music festivals in the UK for 2019

Continue reading...

How a new coming-of-age indie captures the spirit of illegal raves

Delivered... Steve Rose | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 10:00 am

Beats is the latest film to focus on 90s rave culture and its political implications

Incredible as it seems now, in 1994, the British government attempted to outlaw dance music. Like a resentful preacher in a repressive small American town, John Major’s government imposed the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act (CJA), which sought to smite down upon the public menace known as “rave culture”. Triggered by the outbreak of peace, ecstasy and illegal partying that swept Britain in the late 1980s and early 90s, the CJA ushered in new curtailments of civil liberty, the most notorious being Section 63 (1) (b), which legally defined the troublesome music as that which “includes sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats.”

Continue reading...

How a new coming-of-age indie captures the spirit of illegal raves

Delivered... Steve Rose | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 10:00 am

Beats is the latest film to focus on 90s rave culture and its political implications

Incredible as it seems now, in 1994, the British government attempted to outlaw dance music. Like a resentful preacher in a repressive small American town, John Major’s government imposed the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act (CJA), which sought to smite down upon the public menace known as “rave culture”. Triggered by the outbreak of peace, ecstasy and illegal partying that swept Britain in the late 1980s and early 90s, the CJA ushered in new curtailments of civil liberty, the most notorious being Section 63 (1) (b), which legally defined the troublesome music as that which “includes sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats.”

Continue reading...
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