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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » How a new coming-of-age indie captures the spirit of illegal raves


How a new coming-of-age indie captures the spirit of illegal raves

Delivered... Steve Rose | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 10:00 am

Beats is the latest film to focus on 90s rave culture and its political implications

Incredible as it seems now, in 1994, the British government attempted to outlaw dance music. Like a resentful preacher in a repressive small American town, John Major’s government imposed the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act (CJA), which sought to smite down upon the public menace known as “rave culture”. Triggered by the outbreak of peace, ecstasy and illegal partying that swept Britain in the late 1980s and early 90s, the CJA ushered in new curtailments of civil liberty, the most notorious being Section 63 (1) (b), which legally defined the troublesome music as that which “includes sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats.”

Continue reading...

How a new coming-of-age indie captures the spirit of illegal raves

Delivered... Steve Rose | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 10:00 am

Beats is the latest film to focus on 90s rave culture and its political implications

Incredible as it seems now, in 1994, the British government attempted to outlaw dance music. Like a resentful preacher in a repressive small American town, John Major’s government imposed the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act (CJA), which sought to smite down upon the public menace known as “rave culture”. Triggered by the outbreak of peace, ecstasy and illegal partying that swept Britain in the late 1980s and early 90s, the CJA ushered in new curtailments of civil liberty, the most notorious being Section 63 (1) (b), which legally defined the troublesome music as that which “includes sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats.”

Continue reading...
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