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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » June


July Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – Quarterly Issues Programs and Children’s Television Reports, Renewal Announcements, Copyright Filings, EAS, EEO and More

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Sun 30 Jun 2019 5:18 pm

July is an important month for regulatory filings – even though it is one of those months with no FCC submissions tied to any license renewal dates. Instead, quarterly obligations arise this month, the most important of which will have an impact in the ongoing license renewal cycle that began in June (see last month’s update on regulatory dates, here).  Even though there are no renewal filing deadlines this month, radio stations in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and DC must continue their on-air post-filing announcements on the 1st and 16th of the month.  On these same days, pre-filing announcements must be run by radio stations in North and South Carolina, who file their renewals by August 1.  Stations in Florida and Puerto Rico, who file on October 1, should be prepared to start their pre-filing announcements on August 1.  See our article here on pre-filing announcements.

Perhaps the most important date this month is July 10, when all full power AM, FM, Class A TV and full power TV stations must place their quarterly issues/programs lists in their online public inspection files.  The issues/programs list should include details of important issues affecting a station’s community, and the station’s programming aired during April, May, and June that addressed those issues.  The list should include the time, date, duration and title of each program, along with a brief description of each program and how that program relates to a relevant community issue.  We have written many times about the importance of these lists and the fact that the FCC will likely be reviewing online public files for their existence and completeness during the license renewal cycle – and imposing fines on stations that do not have a complete set of these lists for the entire license renewal period (see, for instance, our articles here, here and here).  So be sure to get these important documents – the only official documents that the FCC requires to show how a station has met its overall obligation to serve the public interest – into your online public file by July 10. 

July 10 is also the deadline for TV stations to electronically file with the FCC their quarterly FCC Form 398 children’s programming reports using the FCC’s Licensing and Management System (LMS).  A copy of the form, once filed, should be automatically uploaded by the FCC to the station’s online public inspection file, although station personnel should confirm this step was completed by the FCC as stations retain ultimate responsibility for the contents of their online public files.  TV stations must also complete a certification of compliance with the FCC’s commercial limits during children’s programming aired in the Second Quarter, and that certification must be manually uploaded to the station’s online public file.  TV stations also must complete a certification of compliance with the requirements concerning the display of website addresses during children’s programming.  While the FCC is planning at its July 10 meeting to change these reporting requirements to yearly ones if it adopts the draft order reforming its children’s television rules (we wrote here about that draft order), these revisions will not be effective for many months, so stations should continue to observe this requirement.

Another July 10 deadline is that for TV stations that are being repacked who must submit an FCC Form 2100, Schedule 387 transition progress report.  Quarterly reports are due the 10th of the month following the end of each calendar quarter, and additional reports are due closer to the station’s phase completion date and after completing the transition.  Phase 5 stations do not need to file this quarter because they recently submitted their 10-week Schedule 387 filings.

An annual copyright deadline also falls in July.  Before July 31, all television stations that were carried as a “distant signal” by a cable system during 2018 and that aired a program that they produced for which they own the copyright that was retransmitted by a cable system, should file a copyright royalty claim form in order to make a claim to share in the 2018 cable royalty distribution.

July 10 is also the date by which comments are to be filed with the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division on the possibility of changes to the ASCAP and BMI consent decrees.  These decrees, most fundamentally, require that these two performing rights organizations treat all similarly-situated users of copyrighted music in the same way (no special deals for certain favored users), and give users the right to bring a court action if they believe that the rates proposed for the use of music are not reasonable.  Any fundamental change in these consent decrees could significantly affect the costs of the use of music by broadcasters and other audio companies – so this is a very important proceeding.  See our article here for more information about the current review of these decrees.

All EAS participants need to file updated ETRS Form I by July 3 – updating the basic information for virtually all broadcast stations.  This is in anticipation of the announced August 7 nationwide EAS test.  See our article here for more information.

EEO audit responses from those radio stations covered by the last EEO audit are due July 31 (see our article here about that audit).  The FCC also recently adopted a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking looking for information about the effectiveness of its current EEO rules.  While comments will not be due until 30 days after this Notice in published in the Federal Register, stations should be considering their comments in this proceeding.

Also coming in August will likely be the FCC decision on regulatory fees which will likely be paid in September.  There are significant questions for broadcasters about those fees – as radio fees are proposed to increase substantially, and TV fees are proposed to move to a system where stations pay on predicted coverage, rather than DMA size.  Watch for the FCC’s decision in this proceeding in August.

While we are in the heart of the summer – and everyone’s mind may be on vacation plans – don’t overlook these important regulatory dates coming up this month.  As always, check with your own counsel or legal adviser to make sure that we have not omitted any important dates that apply to your station this month.

‘Michael Eavis didn’t know what dance music is’: a history of rave at Glastonbury

Delivered... Joe Muggs | Scene | Sat 29 Jun 2019 9:00 am

At some point in the late 80s – though no one remembers exactly when – Glastonbury festival became a nexus of the traveller, free party and acid-house scenes, and the festival was never the same again

Giant rubber duckies; tunnels of flowers; bassbins disguised with gingham tablecloths; sitting in upturned burning cars as entertainment. As if it weren’t enough of a struggle trying to get people to untangle their first Glastonbury raving memories from three decades ago, the things they do remember feel pretty hallucinatory on their own.

Nobody can be quite sure when raving first started in Glastonbury. Obviously all-night dancing predates acid house, but through the 80s that meant dub reggae: Youth of Killing Joke and the Orb remembers Saxon and Jah Shaka soundsystems as “the only music you could go dance to all night long that wasn’t acoustic around a bonfire”. The Mutoid Waste Company’s dystopian wreckage sculptures hosted pagan-industrial metal-banging dances throughout the night. Dance music as such wasn’t unknown, though. Mark Darby of Exeter’s Mighty Force collective says: “The first traveller soundsystem playing dance music I personally heard was Crazy Dave’s Record Bus – an old green coach with huge speakers – going through a disco phase, one afternoon at Stonehenge 83!”

Glastonbury is banning single use plastics. The world’s largest greenfield festival wants to avoid scenes of the area in front of its legendary stages being strewn with plastic after the shows have ended. In 2017, visitors to the festival got through 1.3m plastic bottles. 

Continue reading...

MASSIVE X synth arrives; here’s what makes it special

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 27 Jun 2019 2:12 pm

The last time Native Instruments released a synth called Massive, they accidentally helped define genres (EDM, dubstep). But MASSIVE X returns to the original vision: make it easier to get deep with wavetables and modularity and go wild with sound. And now, the wait is over.

It’s been years in the making. But the original team behind Massive are back with a sequel to one of the most influential software synths ever made.

I was actually the very first press member scheduled to see Massive, back in the day. But what that tells you is, initially they thought they were making something for nerds, not what would become EDM mainstages. (Presumably they might have asked someone important not only as a nerd, otherwise.)

In 2019, MASSIVE X enters a world that’s not only been shaped by the first Massive, but is also far more comfortable with digital sounds and modularity, the staples of the original. Even inside NI, you’ve got REAKTOR and BLOCKS. There are plenty of other wavetable synths, plenty of semi-modular plug-ins. There are semi-modular synths – heck, Moog alone has three just in one line. There are Eurorack modulars in pricey hardware racks that require a screwdriver and modeled in software so you just need a laptop.

I mean, basically, those of us who love synths are all really spoiled. And like any spoiled child, little wonder there are bunches of those people whining and crying and rolling around on the floor like a toddler who ate too much candy. Well… if you read message forums, which I try not to.

So is there a place for MASSIVE X? You’ll hear plenty of talk from Native Instruments and reviewers alike, but let’s boil this story down.

MASSIVE X is a rarity – a kitchen sink digital synth plug-in that keeps its front panel easy to read.

Deep routing lets you path when you want to. But unlike a full-blown modular, that doesn’t stop you from creating sounds (and even modularity) straight away – and your sound design remains within a consistent interface and architecture.

Bigger on the inside than it is on the outside

Basically, the latest MASSIVE gives you this: it makes an argument for a semi-modular design by packing the oscillators with features, and then giving you ways of playing and modulating and inter-connecting all that depth easily. It walks that balance between complexity under the hood and legibility inside a coherent interface. So while other people might easily dismiss adding another semi-modular plug-in when you could just patch, there is a fundamentally different method to constructing sounds based on this architecture:

All about those oscillators. 170 wavetables, 10 oscillator modes, submodes for each of the oscillator modes – Massive focuses you on one architecture and one UI, but then gives you loads of choices once you’re there.

Get weird without even patching. It’s a true semi-modular, so you can make sounds without patching anything – and you can use its phase modulation oscillators to start that modulation just from the oscillator section. (Yeah, you’ll wind up doing some sound designs where you never get past those oscillators. And that’s fun, anyway.)

Route and patch in ways conventional modulars can’t. With a huge routing matrix and a unique approach to insert effects, you can swap all sorts of unique processors inside an individual sound – and recall all of those as presets. Any control output can be connected to any input; audio can go to and from anywhere you like. It’s enormously flexible.

There are plenty of synths out there with deep architectures, but MASSIVE X allows you to then take that depth and work with it:

Trackers give you sophisticated control over how MASSIVE X behaves as an instrument – by designing how it responds as you play.

Make uniquely playable instruments. NI have added a number of tools for tracking input from performance, as in velocity, and then scaling and mapping that where you like. This means you can make sounds like instruments, and ‘play’ a lot of that sonic depth live. (There are four Tracker modules to accomplish this.)

Add variety in performance and modulation. Tracker modules let you play live; Performer modulators let you draw in up to eight bars of modulation patterns and use those without playing. That can mean either unattended modulation in the sound, or can be triggered live with your controller.

You have 9 slots for LFOs, voice randomization, and then a bunch of potential sources and shapes for those variations.

The original MASSIVE isn’t going anywhere. And that’s important, because it’s light on the CPU in a way the new X – and other plug-ins – aren’t.

But MASSIVE X is simply a beast. As a flagship for Native Instruments, it enters some competitive waters – not the least being the fact that NI itself has, effectively, more than one flagship.

Performer envelopes give you the kind of extensive, visual modulation you expect from 2019 flagship software. The Remote Editor lets you trigger those envelopes live, making this a tool for improvisation or onstage.

Inside the Voice

Having said MASSIVE X is all about having a consistent architecture and UI – there is definitely a candy store inside. Just some rough ideas of specs, to give you an idea:

Wavetable modes: Standard, Bend, Mirror, Hardsync, Wrap, Forant Capture, ART, Gorilla, Random, Jitter

Insert Effects: Anima, BitCrusher, Correction Filter & VCA, Fold Wrap, Frequency Shifter, Distortion, Track Delay

Unit FX: Dimension Expander, Flanger, Nonlinear Labs, Phaser, Standard EQ, Stereo Delay, Stereo Expander

The Voice page. You can also find some possibilities messing about with Noise Restart, Oscillator Restart, Spread and Engine Reset – think serious sound design with phasing. Combine that with the various oscillator types and modes and poly/mono/unison modes, and a really wild option called Unisono (for unique, analog-ish drifts and detunes), and you could probably devote a whole month in the studio just on this page and be perfectly satisfied.

Filling a Massive niche?

The thing is, MASSIVE X makes even more sense in 2019 than it did when it first arrived. And if MASSIVE demonstrated that a larger slice of the population was ready for edgy, hyper-modulated experimental sounds, MASSIVE X might demonstrate that more people are ready for experimental sound design..

This isn’t a straight modular workflow. It isn’t a Eurorack. It isn’t REAKTOR. And it shouldn’t be any of those things. Instead, MASSIVE X brings back what made the first MASSIVE compelling – drag and drop routing, easy visual “saturn ring” modulation – and adds more sonic depth, the kinds of organic quality now possible on today’s CPUs, and more visual feedback. We all spend too much time staring at screens, but MASSIVE X gives us a good reason to look back – and is far easier on the eyes (and brain) in the process.

So, sure, we are spoiled for choice, which I’m sure means MASSIVE X will get some significant hostility from the sorts of people who lurk in comment threads instead of make sounds. But I’m happy to have my cake and eat it, and my other five cakes, too.

From my own vantage point, having not been entirely swayed by would-be contenders to the plug-in throne, I think MASSIVE X will be ideal as a complement to open-ended modulars. Having a single oscillator section that does this much means you don’t get lost window-shopping modulars. And that matrix and the depth of Trackers and Performers means MASSIVE X is manageable when other modulars (hardware or software) turn into messes of spaghetti-routing, at least for sounds you want to pack to the brim with subtle shifting transformations over time.

More details of this as I spend more time with the now-finished build. (Sound design, too – just give me some time on that!)

[watch this space, we should have the overview video from NI shortly…]

https://native-instruments.com/

Cost:
USD / EUR 199
USD / EUR 149 upgrade from the previous version
Included in KOMPLETE 12 (and greater editions)

Video walkthroughs

Our friends at SonicState and NI themselves have now posted walkthrough videos.

Also I’ve been talking to Richard Devine about how much he’s into MASSIVE X. Here’s a video of him enjoying it:

The competition

There’s indeed a lot of competition. Look to:

U-he‘s ZEBRA2, Hive 2. Also deep modulation, but with a single window mode – more like Massive 1 – to MASSIVE X’s various pages and options.

ARTURIA Pigments We’ll be looking more soon at the sound possibilities of this one. It’s perhaps more conservative than MASSIVE X, but its virtual analog/wavetable hybrid is a crowd pleaser, there’s a unique and easy-to-follow interface, and it has a clear high-contrast dark look to the all-gray/beige Massive approach.

Serum of course arguably stole the bass crown from Massive as NI bided their time on an update. It is focused on wavetables (and custom wavetables) compared to MASSIVE X’s fascinating sprawl.

Who else would you want to see up for comparison? Let us know.

To me, at least my initial impression is all this mayhem of choice makes MASSIVE X stand out, but we’ll be interested to dig deeper and get feedback from other sound designers.

The post MASSIVE X synth arrives; here’s what makes it special appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

MASSIVE X synth arrives; here’s what makes it special

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 27 Jun 2019 2:12 pm

The last time Native Instruments released a synth called Massive, they accidentally helped define genres (EDM, dubstep). But MASSIVE X returns to the original vision: make it easier to get deep with wavetables and modularity and go wild with sound. And now, the wait is over.

It’s been years in the making. But the original team behind Massive are back with a sequel to one of the most influential software synths ever made.

I was actually the very first press meeting for Massive, back in the day. But what that tells you is, initially they thought they were making something for nerds, not what would become EDM mainstages.

In 2019, MASSIVE X enters a world that’s not only been shaped by the first Massive, but is also far more comfortable with digital sounds and modularity, the staples of the original. Even inside NI, you’ve got REAKTOR and BLOCKS. There are plenty of other wavetable synths, plenty of semi-modular plug-ins. There are semi-modular synths – heck, Moog alone has three just in one line. There are Eurorack modulars in pricey hardware racks that require a screwdriver and modeled in software so you just need a laptop.

I mean, basically, those of us who love synths are all really spoiled. And like any spoiled child, little wonder there are bunches of those people whining and crying and rolling around on the floor like a toddler who ate too much candy. Well… if you read message forums, which I try not to.

So is there a place for MASSIVE X? You’ll hear plenty of talk from Native Instruments and reviewers alike, but let’s boil this story down.

MASSIVE X is a rarity – a kitchen sink digital synth plug-in that keeps its front panel easy to read.

Deep routing lets you path when you want to. But unlike a full-blown modular, that doesn’t stop you from creating sounds (and even modularity) straight away – and your sound design remains within a consistent interface and architecture.

Bigger on the inside than it is on the outside

Basically, the latest MASSIVE gives you this: it makes an argument for a semi-modular design by packing the oscillators with features, and then giving you ways of playing and modulating and inter-connecting all that depth easily. It walks that balance between complexity under the hood and legibility inside a coherent interface. So while other people might easily dismiss adding another semi-modular plug-in when you could just patch, there is a fundamentally different method to constructing sounds based on this architecture:

All about those oscillators. 170 wavetables, 10 oscillator modes, submodes for each of the oscillator modes – Massive focuses you on one architecture and one UI, but then gives you loads of choices once you’re there.

Get weird without even patching. It’s a true semi-modular, so you can make sounds without patching anything – and you can use its phase modulation oscillators to start that modulation just from the oscillator section. (Yeah, you’ll wind up doing some sound designs where you never get past those oscillators. And that’s fun, anyway.)

Route and patch in ways conventional modulars can’t. With a huge routing matrix and a unique approach to insert effects, you can swap all sorts of unique processors inside an individual sound – and recall all of those as presets. Any control output can be connected to any input; audio can go to and from anywhere you like. It’s enormously flexible.

There are plenty of synths out there with deep architectures, but MASSIVE X allows you to then take that depth and work with it:

Trackers give you sophisticated control over how MASSIVE X behaves as an instrument – by designing how it responds as you play.

Make uniquely playable instruments. NI have added a number of tools for tracking input from performance, as in velocity, and then scaling and mapping that where you like. This means you can make sounds like instruments, and ‘play’ a lot of that sonic depth live. (There are four Tracker modules to accomplish this.)

Add variety in performance and modulation. Tracker modules let you play live; Performer modulators let you draw in up to eight bars of modulation patterns and use those without playing. That can mean either unattended modulation in the sound, or can be triggered live with your controller.

You have 9 slots for LFOs, voice randomization, and then a bunch of potential sources and shapes for those variations.

The original MASSIVE isn’t going anywhere. And that’s important, because it’s light on the CPU in a way the new X – and other plug-ins – aren’t.

But MASSIVE X is simply a beast. As a flagship for Native Instruments, it enters some competitive waters – not the least being the fact that NI itself has, effectively, more than one flagship.

Performer envelopes give you the kind of extensive, visual modulation you expect from 2019 flagship software. The Remote Editor lets you trigger those envelopes live, making this a tool for improvisation or onstage.

Inside the Voice

Having said MASSIVE X is all about having a consistent architecture and UI – there is definitely a candy store inside. Just some rough ideas of specs, to give you an idea:

Wavetable modes: Standard, Bend, Mirror, Hardsync, Wrap, Forant Capture, ART, Gorilla, Random, Jitter

Insert Effects: Anima, BitCrusher, Correction Filter & VCA, Fold Wrap, Frequency Shifter, Distortion, Track Delay

Unit FX: Dimension Expander, Flanger, Nonlinear Labs, Phaser, Standard EQ, Stereo Delay, Stereo Expander

The Voice page. You can also find some possibilities messing about with Noise Restart, Oscillator Restart, Spread and Engine Reset – think serious sound design with phasing. Combine that with the various oscillator types and modes and poly/mono/unison modes, and a really wild option called Unisono (for unique, analog-ish drifts and detunes), and you could probably devote a whole month in the studio just on this page and be perfectly satisfied.

Filling a Massive niche?

The thing is, MASSIVE X makes even more sense in 2019 than it did when it first arrived. And if MASSIVE demonstrated that a larger slice of the population was ready for edgy, hyper-modulated experimental sounds, MASSIVE X might demonstrate that more people are ready for experimental sound design..

This isn’t a straight modular workflow. It isn’t a Eurorack. It isn’t REAKTOR. And it shouldn’t be any of those things. Instead, MASSIVE X brings back what made the first MASSIVE compelling – drag and drop routing, easy visual “saturn ring” modulation – and adds more sonic depth, the kinds of organic quality now possible on today’s CPUs, and more visual feedback. We all spend too much time staring at screens, but MASSIVE X gives us a good reason to look back – and is far easier on the eyes (and brain) in the process.

So, sure, we are spoiled for choice, which I’m sure means MASSIVE X will get some significant hostility from the sorts of people who lurk in comment threads instead of make sounds. But I’m happy to have my cake and eat it, and my other five cakes, too.

From my own vantage point, having not been entirely swayed by would-be contenders to the plug-in throne, I think MASSIVE X will be ideal as a complement to open-ended modulars. Having a single oscillator section that does this much means you don’t get lost window-shopping modulars. And that matrix and the depth of Trackers and Performers means MASSIVE X is manageable when other modulars (hardware or software) turn into messes of spaghetti-routing, at least for sounds you want to pack to the brim with subtle shifting transformations over time.

More details of this as I spend more time with the now-finished build. (Sound design, too – just give me some time on that!)

[watch this space, we should have the overview video from NI shortly…]

https://native-instruments.com/

Cost:
USD / EUR 199
USD / EUR 149 upgrade from the previous version
Included in KOMPLETE 12 (and greater editions)

The competition

There’s indeed a lot of competition. Look to:

U-he‘s ZEBRA2, Hive 2. Also deep modulation, but with a single window mode – more like Massive 1 – to MASSIVE X’s various pages and options.

ARTURIA Pigments We’ll be looking more soon at the sound possibilities of this one. It’s perhaps more conservative than MASSIVE X, but its virtual analog/wavetable hybrid is a crowd pleaser, there’s a unique and easy-to-follow interface, and it has a clear high-contrast dark look to the all-gray/beige Massive approach.

Serum of course arguably stole the bass crown from Massive as NI bided their time on an update. It is focused on wavetables (and custom wavetables) compared to MASSIVE X’s fascinating sprawl.

Who else would you want to see up for comparison? Let us know.

To me, at least my initial impression is all this mayhem of choice makes MASSIVE X stand out, but we’ll be interested to dig deeper and get feedback from other sound designers.

The post MASSIVE X synth arrives; here’s what makes it special appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Video: Nucleya: “The Worst Feedback I’ve Read About My Music Is…” – NDTV

Delivered... | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 4:36 pm
Video: Nucleya: "The Worst Feedback I've Read About My Music Is..."  NDTV

Indian electronic music producer Nucleya (Udyan Sagar) is one of the hottest names in the indie music scene in the country right now. Gadgets 360 met up with ...

Learn synthesis basics in your browser, free, with Ableton

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 3:51 pm

If you still don’t know your LFO from your amplitude envelope from your square oscillator – or you’re trying to answer this for someone else – Ableton have made everything visual and playable and sonic, in a browser, for free.

Ableton’s educational tools have been uniquely popular among users, even those not using Ableton Live. And “Learning Synths” doesn’t make even the slightest passing reference to Ableton’s hardware and software products, though you will see their recent signature graphic style.

Instead, you get playful graphics and simple, clear explanations, and little in-browser toys you can play with. True to the company’s German roots, it all feels like stylish design in the nation of Bauhaus – for kids or adults. It’s a great reminder that playing synths is play – and can be friendly to total beginners, too.

It’s enough fun to mess around with that you’ll probably enjoy paging through this, and the finishing playground, even if you do know what you’re doing. If you don’t, it starts at absolute zero, holding your hands from step one – so now is the time to brush up.

You’ll get only those basics, but for oscillators, amplitude envelope, and modulation, it covers the nuts and bolts. And it should be inspiration to anyone hoping to make educational materials for more.

By the way, this is doubly relevant as toolchains for plug-ins begin to support Web development, too. It means we may soon see learning as an interactive process that happens on phones, tablets, and computers, rather than the painful method of having a PDF in one window and tabbing back to a computer screen. But it’s also important that Ableton recognize that teaching some concepts is best done without the usual chrome and knobs and widgets of the interface you use day to day. I expect we’ll see education evolve in both lines. It’s time for the interactive Web to replace the static PDF.

And personally, while this may seem basic, I never tire of returning to thinking about the basics, both as a musician and as a teacher. I think it always refreshes the brain.

Now, if someone can just teach us all to mix better… ahem. (I know that’s the question people constantly ask me.)

https://learningsynths.ableton.com/

The post Learn synthesis basics in your browser, free, with Ableton appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Learn synthesis basics in your browser, free, with Ableton

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 3:51 pm

If you still don’t know your LFO from your amplitude envelope from your square oscillator – or you’re trying to answer this for someone else – Ableton have made everything visual and playable and sonic, in a browser, for free.

Ableton’s educational tools have been uniquely popular among users, even those not using Ableton Live. And “Learning Synths” doesn’t make even the slightest passing reference to Ableton’s hardware and software products, though you will see their recent signature graphic style.

Instead, you get playful graphics and simple, clear explanations, and little in-browser toys you can play with. True to the company’s German roots, it all feels like stylish design in the nation of Bauhaus – for kids or adults. It’s a great reminder that playing synths is play – and can be friendly to total beginners, too.

It’s enough fun to mess around with that you’ll probably enjoy paging through this, and the finishing playground, even if you do know what you’re doing. If you don’t, it starts at absolute zero, holding your hands from step one – so now is the time to brush up.

You’ll get only those basics, but for oscillators, amplitude envelope, and modulation, it covers the nuts and bolts. And it should be inspiration to anyone hoping to make educational materials for more.

By the way, this is doubly relevant as toolchains for plug-ins begin to support Web development, too. It means we may soon see learning as an interactive process that happens on phones, tablets, and computers, rather than the painful method of having a PDF in one window and tabbing back to a computer screen. But it’s also important that Ableton recognize that teaching some concepts is best done without the usual chrome and knobs and widgets of the interface you use day to day. I expect we’ll see education evolve in both lines. It’s time for the interactive Web to replace the static PDF.

And personally, while this may seem basic, I never tire of returning to thinking about the basics, both as a musician and as a teacher. I think it always refreshes the brain.

Now, if someone can just teach us all to mix better… ahem. (I know that’s the question people constantly ask me.)

https://learningsynths.ableton.com/

The post Learn synthesis basics in your browser, free, with Ableton appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Hidden gems on the 2019 Glastonbury lineup

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 2:47 pm

Bewildered by the hundreds of acts at Glastonbury? The Guardian’s music editors pick the best names from lower down the bill

The must-see musical experience of the weekend is this brand-new stage from the Block9 crew, whose club spaces routinely provide the festival’s best after-hours moments. IICON will have artists playing from a giant sculpture of a head, and they’re a who’s who of cutting-edge electronics: galaxy-cartographer Larry Heard, dub geniuses Raime, thunderously angry poet Moor Mother, junglist poet Lee Gamble, South African pairing Okzharp and Manthe Ribane, and tons of forward-thinking techno: Bruce, Zenker Brothers, Karenn and more. Sleep all day, bring a carrier bag of falafels, and you could happily spend your entire weekend here.

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A 10 Track Guide To The Funky World Of Old-School Disco Re-Edit Services

Delivered... Derek Opperman | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 2:32 pm

The post A 10 Track Guide To The Funky World Of Old-School Disco Re-Edit Services appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Euphoria here we come! Fatboy Slim on his ‘silent’ Ibiza film with Julien Temple

Delivered... Sam Wollaston | Scene | Tue 25 Jun 2019 12:53 pm

Norman Cook has spent three decades blowing the Ibiza party crowd away. The DJ reveals why he teamed up with the director to capture 2,000 years of the island’s wild, strange history

Superstar DJ Fatboy Slim was recently thinking about – and questioning – what it is he does. “I’m just a middle-aged man playing a lot of loud squelching noises to young people, waving his arms around in the air. What really is that?” he asked himself.

But then it does make them dance and smile, and he, Norman Cook, still enjoys doing it. “It’s not what I would have chosen to be doing at this age” – 55 – “but I’m loving it so much. It’s the best job in the world because I love music, and my love of music involves sharing it with people.”

Ibiza: The Silent Movie is out 5 July and screens at Glastonbury on 26 June.

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FCC Releases Draft Order on Changes to Children’s Television Rules – Action Expected July 10

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 24 Jun 2019 3:00 pm

In anticipation of its July 10 open meeting, the FCC last week released its draft Order making changes to its rules requiring television stations to broadcast specific amounts of educational and informational programming directed to children.  The current rules require that stations air an average of three hours of such programming every week for every channel of programming they broadcast.  The current rules also impose all sorts of restrictions on programming for it to be considered “Core Programming” that can be counted toward meeting the three-hour per channel obligation.  The draft Order, if adopted at the July meeting, would ease some of the restrictions and, perhaps most importantly, eliminate the requirement that, for each multicast channel, three hours of unique educational programming directed to children be broadcast.

The Commission surveyed the current TV marketplace and found that, in the 15 years since it adopted the requirement that there be 3 hours of programming per multicast channel, much more educational and informational programming for children has become available – through public broadcasting and through new programming sources, including those delivered online.  Providing those three extra hours of educational and informational programming imposed significant cost burdens on broadcasters (even a weather radar channel carried with it a three-hour children’s programming obligation) for seemingly little benefit given the availability of so much other kids’ programming elsewhere.  The FCC draft Order also would change some of the specific requirements for station’s primary video channel.

Some of the significant changes for the three-hour obligation for the primary channel include the following:

  • Obligations would be reviewed based on quarterly and yearly hours goals, rather than average weekly requirements
  • To avoid heightened scrutiny at license renewal time (which would require a station to show that all of its other efforts directed to children were so important that it excused the station’s noncompliance with these processing guidelines – a showing rarely attempted because of the uncertainty that it creates), a station would need to meet one of the following two criteria:
    1. It broadcast 156 annual hours of regularly scheduled Core Programming consisting of programs that were at least 30 minutes in length (consistent with the current policy); or
    2. It broadcasts 156 annual hours of Core Programing of which at least 26 hours per quarter (essentially 2 hours per week) were regularly scheduled programs of at least 30 minutes in length, but the remaining 13 hours per quarter could be some combination of either special educational and informational programming for children of at least 30 minutes duration or short-form programming meeting those needs (including PSAs and interstitial short-form educational programs).
  • Up to 13 hours per quarter of a station’s required educational programming directed to children could be broadcast on a multicast channel of the station rather than on its primary video channel
  • Core programming could be aired between 6 AM and 10 PM, rather than 7 AM to 10 PM as currently allowed.
  • Changes are also set out providing more flexibility in the requirements for dealing with children’s programs that are preempted in their normal time slots.
  • Children’s programming reports (FCC Form 398) would be filed on a yearly basis instead of quarterly, and public file documentation of compliance with the limits on advertising in children’s programming would also be placed into a station’s online public file annually – by the 30th day of the end of each calendar year. And stations would no longer be obligated to publicize the existence and location of the Form 398 filings.

The draft Order contains many other changes – and is worth careful review by all television operators.

The draft Order also contains a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking asking for comments on other potential future changes in the rules.  One intriguing proposal would allow broadcasters to be relieved of their children’s television obligations if they financially support another station which runs more children’s programming than otherwise required – the idea being advanced that concentrating that educational programming on a single station would make it easier to find for children and their parents.

If adopted at the FCC meeting in July, the Order will become effective after Federal Register publication and review under the Paperwork Reduction Act – so it will probably be several months in the future before many of these changes become effective.  Comments on the Further Notice will be due after Federal Register publication.  I’m sure that many TV operators will be watching the July 10 meeting to see if the FCC adopts this proposed Order without significant changes.

Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 24 Jun 2019 2:48 pm

Gamechanger Audio’s Motor Synth is a devastating industrial machine – with actual motors driving the sounds, all built in Latvia. Here’s everything you need to know about it, as this week is the end of its steep crowd funding discount.

Electro-magnetic induction is a technique beloved by noise artists and experimental sound creators – about 40 seconds into the promo video, you’ll see what happens when you run a power drill near an electric guitar.

The Motor Synth creators ask the question, what if you took that gnarly, unruly chaos, and packed it into a desktop synth? That makes this raw sound force and not only makes it more portable, but also more controllable. You can unleash the full power of electro-magnetic sonic destruction if you want, but you can also direct it into musical form.

The result is a unique combination of sound produced by mechanical motors and electro-magnetic energy, and musical, digital and electronic control.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/motor-synth#/

Gamechanger Audio also have the track record to pull off this kind of custom manufacturing. As with their other neighbors in the capital city of Riga, Latvia, Gamechanger benefit from having their engineering and design in an industrial city that’s newly reborn, and ready to work with innovative clients while literally speaking the same language. (That’s inside the European Union, in case you’ve been asleep since the 80s – sit down, there’s something huge I need to tell you about the USSR.) And they’ve made some exceptionally fine products, like the PLUS Pedal and PLASMA Pedal.

There are plenty of crowd-funded projects that seem to do it for the sake of it or for lack of a better idea. But the Motor Synth really does appear to be something where a crowd funding campaign, preorder style, enables a unique design. And in exchange, you get a steep discount – right now US$899 early bird instead of $1299.

So, what can you do with those motors?

The basic sound itself produces wild harmonics and overtones. There are eight motors, grouped into four-note polyphony – two motors/two voices per note.

The interesting twist is that there are two simultaneous synthesis methods build around the motor:
Magnetic pickups, for raw electro-mechanical chaos, and
Optical (infrared) sensors, which produce pitched signal by “reading” the discs’ motion visually

The optical approach echoes the optical synthesis approaches of early Russian pioneers and BBC Radiophonic Workshop innovator Daphne Oram. Check Derek Holzer’s terrific outline history of these optical tonewheels, or Moscow’s Andrey Smirnov. Smirnov in particular had championed a revived interest in these approaches – and Evgeny Sholpo’s Variophone, an early instrument that did what the Motor Synth did, at its most basic level. Like the Motor Synth, the Variophone employs mechanical, rotating disks.

Andrey’s presentations can become almost wistful in imagining an alternate history where optical and mechanical synthesis evolved instead of just today’s analog synths. Gamechanger are punching a hole through the multiverse and taking us into an alternative future.

Okay, but with that as the sound source, how does this actually become a synth and not just a sound art experiment? That’s where the Motor Synth comes alive:

Waveshape between three optical waveshapes and one (noisy!) inductive motor sound
Amplitude envelope
Accelerate, brake (your glide here is mechanical!)
Filter with drive
Modulation of voice envelopes (tremolo), pitch, filter
Onboard keyboard with scale, latch/momentary, and adjustable pitch – very analog
Mono, poly, unison modes
Arpeggiator, sequencer, loop modes
Digital recall of parameters
MIDI control of all parameters – you can even use MTS for microtuning, send MIDI CC, or assign velocity and aftertouch

It’s really pulling this together with the sequencing options, including slots for live-saving sequences, loops, and arpeggiators as motion sequencing as you play, that makes this a full-featured instrument. You’re limited to 4-voice polyphony, not 8-voice, but they are planning something called split mode for working with per-motor controls.

You also get not only the requisite MIDI, USB, and audio out I/O, but also audio input (which you can pitch track), separate sends pre-filter for inserting effects, CV (pitch/clock/gate), and more. Those features are evolving but already look terrific.

Check all that I/O, including CV on the lower left-hand side of the image.

All in all, it’s a complete and new sonic toolkit, not just a simple synth with a weird motor gimmick. And having heard it live, it really comes alive – the properties of both the optical and electro-magnetic sound sources produce something that’s deeply organic and beautifully unpredictable.

Plus there’s a strobe light to make the whole thing look insanely cool.

Heck, even Jim Jarmush wants one:

There’s lots more information on the crowd-funding page, plus my favorite FAQ addition, which I’ll paraphrase – no, you don’t want to touch the motors, unless you like turning your fingers into a bloody mess. (I don’t want to know how you handle power tools, either.)

Motor Synth @ indiegogo.com

The post Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 24 Jun 2019 2:48 pm

Gamechanger Audio’s Motor Synth is a devastating industrial machine – with actual motors driving the sounds, all built in Latvia. Here’s everything you need to know about it, as this week is the end of its steep crowd funding discount.

Electro-magnetic induction is a technique beloved by noise artists and experimental sound creators – about 40 seconds into the promo video, you’ll see what happens when you run a power drill near an electric guitar.

The Motor Synth creators ask the question, what if you took that gnarly, unruly chaos, and packed it into a desktop synth? That makes this raw sound force and not only makes it more portable, but also more controllable. You can unleash the full power of electro-magnetic sonic destruction if you want, but you can also direct it into musical form.

The result is a unique combination of sound produced by mechanical motors and electro-magnetic energy, and musical, digital and electronic control.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/motor-synth#/

Gamechanger Audio also have the track record to pull off this kind of custom manufacturing. As with their other neighbors in the capital city of Riga, Latvia, Gamechanger benefit from having their engineering and design in an industrial city that’s newly reborn, and ready to work with innovative clients while literally speaking the same language. (That’s inside the European Union, in case you’ve been asleep since the 80s – sit down, there’s something huge I need to tell you about the USSR.) And they’ve made some exceptionally fine products, like the PLUS Pedal and PLASMA Pedal.

There are plenty of crowd-funded projects that seem to do it for the sake of it or for lack of a better idea. But the Motor Synth really does appear to be something where a crowd funding campaign, preorder style, enables a unique design. And in exchange, you get a steep discount – right now US$899 early bird instead of $1299.

So, what can you do with those motors?

The basic sound itself produces wild harmonics and overtones. There are eight motors, grouped into four-note polyphony – two motors/two voices per note.

The interesting twist is that there are two simultaneous synthesis methods build around the motor:
Magnetic pickups, for raw electro-mechanical chaos, and
Optical (infrared) sensors, which produce pitched signal by “reading” the discs’ motion visually

The optical approach echoes the optical synthesis approaches of early Russian pioneers and BBC Radiophonic Workshop innovator Daphne Oram. Check Derek Holzer’s terrific outline history of these optical tonewheels, or Moscow’s Andrey Smirnov. Smirnov in particular had championed a revived interest in these approaches – and Evgeny Sholpo’s Variophone, an early instrument that did what the Motor Synth did, at its most basic level. Like the Motor Synth, the Variophone employs mechanical, rotating disks.

Andrey’s presentations can become almost wistful in imagining an alternate history where optical and mechanical synthesis evolved instead of just today’s analog synths. Gamechanger are punching a hole through the multiverse and taking us into an alternative future.

Okay, but with that as the sound source, how does this actually become a synth and not just a sound art experiment? That’s where the Motor Synth comes alive:

Waveshape between three optical waveshapes and one (noisy!) inductive motor sound
Amplitude envelope
Accelerate, brake (your glide here is mechanical!)
Filter with drive
Modulation of voice envelopes (tremolo), pitch, filter
Onboard keyboard with scale, latch/momentary, and adjustable pitch – very analog
Mono, poly, unison modes
Arpeggiator, sequencer, loop modes
Digital recall of parameters
MIDI control of all parameters – you can even use MTS for microtuning, send MIDI CC, or assign velocity and aftertouch

It’s really pulling this together with the sequencing options, including slots for live-saving sequences, loops, and arpeggiators as motion sequencing as you play, that makes this a full-featured instrument. You’re limited to 4-voice polyphony, not 8-voice, but they are planning something called split mode for working with per-motor controls.

You also get not only the requisite MIDI, USB, and audio out I/O, but also audio input (which you can pitch track), separate sends pre-filter for inserting effects, CV (pitch/clock/gate), and more. Those features are evolving but already look terrific.

Check all that I/O, including CV on the lower left-hand side of the image.

All in all, it’s a complete and new sonic toolkit, not just a simple synth with a weird motor gimmick. And having heard it live, it really comes alive – the properties of both the optical and electro-magnetic sound sources produce something that’s deeply organic and beautifully unpredictable.

Plus there’s a strobe light to make the whole thing look insanely cool.

Heck, even Jim Jarmush wants one:

There’s lots more information on the crowd-funding page, plus my favorite FAQ addition, which I’ll paraphrase – no, you don’t want to touch the motors, unless you like turning your fingers into a bloody mess. (I don’t want to know how you handle power tools, either.)

Motor Synth @ indiegogo.com

The post Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Watch This: Burudu Announce ‘Speaking of Listening’ EP, Share Ethereal New Single ‘ Llamas’ – The Bangin Beats

Delivered... | Scene | Sat 22 Jun 2019 9:39 am
Watch This: Burudu Announce 'Speaking of Listening' EP, Share Ethereal New Single ' Llamas'  The Bangin Beats

Indian electronic music duo Burudu made their highly anticipated comeback earlier this year with the debut of their stunning new single, 'Trading Nois...

Delaydelus 2 is a patchable sampler/delay from Daedelus, Dr. Bleep

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Fri 21 Jun 2019 6:04 pm

Delaydelus 2 is a devilishly clever box that’s really two devices in one – it’s a sampler, and it’s a pitch-able delay with feedback. And the whole thing is patchable. Meet the latest from Daedelus and Dr. Bleep.

Daedelus is the southern California producer and artist who among other things has pioneered visual immersive shows and was one of the first champions for the monome. Dr. Bleep is John-Mike Reed, the imaginative engineer behind the likes of the Thingamagoop. The original Delaydelus certainly embodied their collective ideas. But it was more of a alligator-clipped art oddity. Delaydelus 2 looks like a serious pedalboard contender.

There’s a great demo video:

Check the specs:

Stereo 16bit 44kHz audio i/o
Banana plug patch bay allows you to play up to 4 samples at once triggered from the two arcade buttons or trigger inputs.
Control the speed and direction of the samples with the knobs as well as the CV FM (-5V to 10V) input
CV envelope follower out (0-8V) based on audio playback level
Trigger outs (10V) from each sampler button.
One shot mode, Gate (mpc style) mode, + Send external audio through the built in 1 second stereo delay.
Record into one of 10 banks. Each can hold up to 17 seconds of high quality audio.
Delay sync in and out with the ability to divide and multiply incoming sync rate.
Micro SD card slot allows loading and saving WAV files to and from the 10 banks.
Built-in new samples from Daedelus
Powered by a 12V DC adapter – included.

Gorgeous artwork on the top panel by Chicago’s Trek Matthews, too.

What I think makes this musical, as on any musical delay, is really making pitch and time open to control and modulation. Pairing the delay with a sampler means this instrument can do a whole lot – and it’s nice having removable SD storage.

This is available for preorder now, with the first units hitting production in August (if you get in on that preorder).

US$295.

https://bleeplabs.com/product/delaydelus-2-preorder/

By the way, as we wait on this preorder, I’m in the next days putting the wraps on my review of Snazzy FX pedals, including in particular their wonderful WOW AND FLUTTER. I could imagine this pairing with the Bleep offering nicely – like faking a whole tape studio in two compact pedals:

The post Delaydelus 2 is a patchable sampler/delay from Daedelus, Dr. Bleep appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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