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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » June » 24


FCC Releases Draft Order on Changes to Children’s Television Rules – Action Expected July 10

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 24 Jun 2019 3:00 pm

In anticipation of its July 10 open meeting, the FCC last week released its draft Order making changes to its rules requiring television stations to broadcast specific amounts of educational and informational programming directed to children.  The current rules require that stations air an average of three hours of such programming every week for every channel of programming they broadcast.  The current rules also impose all sorts of restrictions on programming for it to be considered “Core Programming” that can be counted toward meeting the three-hour per channel obligation.  The draft Order, if adopted at the July meeting, would ease some of the restrictions and, perhaps most importantly, eliminate the requirement that, for each multicast channel, three hours of unique educational programming directed to children be broadcast.

The Commission surveyed the current TV marketplace and found that, in the 15 years since it adopted the requirement that there be 3 hours of programming per multicast channel, much more educational and informational programming for children has become available – through public broadcasting and through new programming sources, including those delivered online.  Providing those three extra hours of educational and informational programming imposed significant cost burdens on broadcasters (even a weather radar channel carried with it a three-hour children’s programming obligation) for seemingly little benefit given the availability of so much other kids’ programming elsewhere.  The FCC draft Order also would change some of the specific requirements for station’s primary video channel.

Some of the significant changes for the three-hour obligation for the primary channel include the following:

  • Obligations would be reviewed based on quarterly and yearly hours goals, rather than average weekly requirements
  • To avoid heightened scrutiny at license renewal time (which would require a station to show that all of its other efforts directed to children were so important that it excused the station’s noncompliance with these processing guidelines – a showing rarely attempted because of the uncertainty that it creates), a station would need to meet one of the following two criteria:
    1. It broadcast 156 annual hours of regularly scheduled Core Programming consisting of programs that were at least 30 minutes in length (consistent with the current policy); or
    2. It broadcasts 156 annual hours of Core Programing of which at least 26 hours per quarter (essentially 2 hours per week) were regularly scheduled programs of at least 30 minutes in length, but the remaining 13 hours per quarter could be some combination of either special educational and informational programming for children of at least 30 minutes duration or short-form programming meeting those needs (including PSAs and interstitial short-form educational programs).
  • Up to 13 hours per quarter of a station’s required educational programming directed to children could be broadcast on a multicast channel of the station rather than on its primary video channel
  • Core programming could be aired between 6 AM and 10 PM, rather than 7 AM to 10 PM as currently allowed.
  • Changes are also set out providing more flexibility in the requirements for dealing with children’s programs that are preempted in their normal time slots.
  • Children’s programming reports (FCC Form 398) would be filed on a yearly basis instead of quarterly, and public file documentation of compliance with the limits on advertising in children’s programming would also be placed into a station’s online public file annually – by the 30th day of the end of each calendar year. And stations would no longer be obligated to publicize the existence and location of the Form 398 filings.

The draft Order contains many other changes – and is worth careful review by all television operators.

The draft Order also contains a Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking asking for comments on other potential future changes in the rules.  One intriguing proposal would allow broadcasters to be relieved of their children’s television obligations if they financially support another station which runs more children’s programming than otherwise required – the idea being advanced that concentrating that educational programming on a single station would make it easier to find for children and their parents.

If adopted at the FCC meeting in July, the Order will become effective after Federal Register publication and review under the Paperwork Reduction Act – so it will probably be several months in the future before many of these changes become effective.  Comments on the Further Notice will be due after Federal Register publication.  I’m sure that many TV operators will be watching the July 10 meeting to see if the FCC adopts this proposed Order without significant changes.

Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 24 Jun 2019 2:48 pm

Gamechanger Audio’s Motor Synth is a devastating industrial machine – with actual motors driving the sounds, all built in Latvia. Here’s everything you need to know about it, as this week is the end of its steep crowd funding discount.

Electro-magnetic induction is a technique beloved by noise artists and experimental sound creators – about 40 seconds into the promo video, you’ll see what happens when you run a power drill near an electric guitar.

The Motor Synth creators ask the question, what if you took that gnarly, unruly chaos, and packed it into a desktop synth? That makes this raw sound force and not only makes it more portable, but also more controllable. You can unleash the full power of electro-magnetic sonic destruction if you want, but you can also direct it into musical form.

The result is a unique combination of sound produced by mechanical motors and electro-magnetic energy, and musical, digital and electronic control.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/motor-synth#/

Gamechanger Audio also have the track record to pull off this kind of custom manufacturing. As with their other neighbors in the capital city of Riga, Latvia, Gamechanger benefit from having their engineering and design in an industrial city that’s newly reborn, and ready to work with innovative clients while literally speaking the same language. (That’s inside the European Union, in case you’ve been asleep since the 80s – sit down, there’s something huge I need to tell you about the USSR.) And they’ve made some exceptionally fine products, like the PLUS Pedal and PLASMA Pedal.

There are plenty of crowd-funded projects that seem to do it for the sake of it or for lack of a better idea. But the Motor Synth really does appear to be something where a crowd funding campaign, preorder style, enables a unique design. And in exchange, you get a steep discount – right now US$899 early bird instead of $1299.

So, what can you do with those motors?

The basic sound itself produces wild harmonics and overtones. There are eight motors, grouped into four-note polyphony – two motors/two voices per note.

The interesting twist is that there are two simultaneous synthesis methods build around the motor:
Magnetic pickups, for raw electro-mechanical chaos, and
Optical (infrared) sensors, which produce pitched signal by “reading” the discs’ motion visually

The optical approach echoes the optical synthesis approaches of early Russian pioneers and BBC Radiophonic Workshop innovator Daphne Oram. Check Derek Holzer’s terrific outline history of these optical tonewheels, or Moscow’s Andrey Smirnov. Smirnov in particular had championed a revived interest in these approaches – and Evgeny Sholpo’s Variophone, an early instrument that did what the Motor Synth did, at its most basic level. Like the Motor Synth, the Variophone employs mechanical, rotating disks.

Andrey’s presentations can become almost wistful in imagining an alternate history where optical and mechanical synthesis evolved instead of just today’s analog synths. Gamechanger are punching a hole through the multiverse and taking us into an alternative future.

Okay, but with that as the sound source, how does this actually become a synth and not just a sound art experiment? That’s where the Motor Synth comes alive:

Waveshape between three optical waveshapes and one (noisy!) inductive motor sound
Amplitude envelope
Accelerate, brake (your glide here is mechanical!)
Filter with drive
Modulation of voice envelopes (tremolo), pitch, filter
Onboard keyboard with scale, latch/momentary, and adjustable pitch – very analog
Mono, poly, unison modes
Arpeggiator, sequencer, loop modes
Digital recall of parameters
MIDI control of all parameters – you can even use MTS for microtuning, send MIDI CC, or assign velocity and aftertouch

It’s really pulling this together with the sequencing options, including slots for live-saving sequences, loops, and arpeggiators as motion sequencing as you play, that makes this a full-featured instrument. You’re limited to 4-voice polyphony, not 8-voice, but they are planning something called split mode for working with per-motor controls.

You also get not only the requisite MIDI, USB, and audio out I/O, but also audio input (which you can pitch track), separate sends pre-filter for inserting effects, CV (pitch/clock/gate), and more. Those features are evolving but already look terrific.

Check all that I/O, including CV on the lower left-hand side of the image.

All in all, it’s a complete and new sonic toolkit, not just a simple synth with a weird motor gimmick. And having heard it live, it really comes alive – the properties of both the optical and electro-magnetic sound sources produce something that’s deeply organic and beautifully unpredictable.

Plus there’s a strobe light to make the whole thing look insanely cool.

Heck, even Jim Jarmush wants one:

There’s lots more information on the crowd-funding page, plus my favorite FAQ addition, which I’ll paraphrase – no, you don’t want to touch the motors, unless you like turning your fingers into a bloody mess. (I don’t want to know how you handle power tools, either.)

Motor Synth @ indiegogo.com

The post Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 24 Jun 2019 2:48 pm

Gamechanger Audio’s Motor Synth is a devastating industrial machine – with actual motors driving the sounds, all built in Latvia. Here’s everything you need to know about it, as this week is the end of its steep crowd funding discount.

Electro-magnetic induction is a technique beloved by noise artists and experimental sound creators – about 40 seconds into the promo video, you’ll see what happens when you run a power drill near an electric guitar.

The Motor Synth creators ask the question, what if you took that gnarly, unruly chaos, and packed it into a desktop synth? That makes this raw sound force and not only makes it more portable, but also more controllable. You can unleash the full power of electro-magnetic sonic destruction if you want, but you can also direct it into musical form.

The result is a unique combination of sound produced by mechanical motors and electro-magnetic energy, and musical, digital and electronic control.

https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/motor-synth#/

Gamechanger Audio also have the track record to pull off this kind of custom manufacturing. As with their other neighbors in the capital city of Riga, Latvia, Gamechanger benefit from having their engineering and design in an industrial city that’s newly reborn, and ready to work with innovative clients while literally speaking the same language. (That’s inside the European Union, in case you’ve been asleep since the 80s – sit down, there’s something huge I need to tell you about the USSR.) And they’ve made some exceptionally fine products, like the PLUS Pedal and PLASMA Pedal.

There are plenty of crowd-funded projects that seem to do it for the sake of it or for lack of a better idea. But the Motor Synth really does appear to be something where a crowd funding campaign, preorder style, enables a unique design. And in exchange, you get a steep discount – right now US$899 early bird instead of $1299.

So, what can you do with those motors?

The basic sound itself produces wild harmonics and overtones. There are eight motors, grouped into four-note polyphony – two motors/two voices per note.

The interesting twist is that there are two simultaneous synthesis methods build around the motor:
Magnetic pickups, for raw electro-mechanical chaos, and
Optical (infrared) sensors, which produce pitched signal by “reading” the discs’ motion visually

The optical approach echoes the optical synthesis approaches of early Russian pioneers and BBC Radiophonic Workshop innovator Daphne Oram. Check Derek Holzer’s terrific outline history of these optical tonewheels, or Moscow’s Andrey Smirnov. Smirnov in particular had championed a revived interest in these approaches – and Evgeny Sholpo’s Variophone, an early instrument that did what the Motor Synth did, at its most basic level. Like the Motor Synth, the Variophone employs mechanical, rotating disks.

Andrey’s presentations can become almost wistful in imagining an alternate history where optical and mechanical synthesis evolved instead of just today’s analog synths. Gamechanger are punching a hole through the multiverse and taking us into an alternative future.

Okay, but with that as the sound source, how does this actually become a synth and not just a sound art experiment? That’s where the Motor Synth comes alive:

Waveshape between three optical waveshapes and one (noisy!) inductive motor sound
Amplitude envelope
Accelerate, brake (your glide here is mechanical!)
Filter with drive
Modulation of voice envelopes (tremolo), pitch, filter
Onboard keyboard with scale, latch/momentary, and adjustable pitch – very analog
Mono, poly, unison modes
Arpeggiator, sequencer, loop modes
Digital recall of parameters
MIDI control of all parameters – you can even use MTS for microtuning, send MIDI CC, or assign velocity and aftertouch

It’s really pulling this together with the sequencing options, including slots for live-saving sequences, loops, and arpeggiators as motion sequencing as you play, that makes this a full-featured instrument. You’re limited to 4-voice polyphony, not 8-voice, but they are planning something called split mode for working with per-motor controls.

You also get not only the requisite MIDI, USB, and audio out I/O, but also audio input (which you can pitch track), separate sends pre-filter for inserting effects, CV (pitch/clock/gate), and more. Those features are evolving but already look terrific.

Check all that I/O, including CV on the lower left-hand side of the image.

All in all, it’s a complete and new sonic toolkit, not just a simple synth with a weird motor gimmick. And having heard it live, it really comes alive – the properties of both the optical and electro-magnetic sound sources produce something that’s deeply organic and beautifully unpredictable.

Plus there’s a strobe light to make the whole thing look insanely cool.

Heck, even Jim Jarmush wants one:

There’s lots more information on the crowd-funding page, plus my favorite FAQ addition, which I’ll paraphrase – no, you don’t want to touch the motors, unless you like turning your fingers into a bloody mess. (I don’t want to know how you handle power tools, either.)

Motor Synth @ indiegogo.com

The post Motor Synth is brutal, electro-mechanical synth – last days of discount appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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