Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » July » 29


Grainstation-C is a free granular tool with ambisonics, and an album to match

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 8:39 pm

It started as an artist tool, but it could become yours, as well. Grainstation-C is a free and open source sound creation workstation that’s playable live and supports ambisonic spatial sound. And the music its creators makes is ethereal and wonderful.

Micah Frank, noted sound designer and toolmaker as well as composer/musician, produced Grainstation-C for his own work but has expanded it to an open source offering for everybody. I’ve been waiting for this one for a while, and I think it could appeal both to people looking for a unique tool as well as those wanting to learn a bit more about granular sound in Csound.

https://github.com/chronopolis5k/Grainstation-C [link + full installation instructions, etc.]

http://csound.com/download.html [requisite Csound install]

The engine: 4 streams from disk, 3 streams from live input. Live audio looping, multiple grain controls, six independent pitch delay lines, six switchable low- and high-pass filters. Snapshot saving.

Powered by: Csound, the modern free and open source sound creation tool that evolved from the grandparent of all digital audio tools.

Live control: It’s pre-mapped to the eminently useful Novation LaunchControl XL MK2, but you could easily remap it to other MIDI controllers if you prefer.

Ambisonics: This optional spatial audio processing lets you use a standard format to adapt to immersive sound environments – in three-dee! Or not, as you like.

It’s deep stuff – even with different granular modes and controls (time stretching, frame animation, pitch shifting). The inspiration, says Micah, was the now-discontinued System Concrète, a complete MakeNoise modular rig that combined grains with modulation, filtering, and delays. But – as is easily possible with software, unconstrained by knobs and space and money – he kept going from there.

Equally notable is the ethereal, beautiful album Quetico that also debuts this week, on Micah’s own Puremagnetik record label. Once, the line between toolmakers and musicians, engineers and composers was thought sacred – even with elaborate explanations about why the two couldn’t be compared. But just as electronic artists have demolished other sacred walls (club and concert, for instance), Micah is part of a generation doing away with those old prejudices.

And the results are richly sensual – warm waves of sound processed from Yellowstone geysers and Big Sur nights, Micah says. It’s classic ambient music, and the tool simply melts away, the essential craft of delivering a palette of sound. At the same time, being transparent with the tools is the ultimate confidence in one’s own musical invention. Micah’s Puremagnetik was a business built in making sounds for others, and yet both the album and free tool suggest the limitless possibility of that act of sharing.

In any event, this is acousmatic creation of the finest quality, with or without the GitHub link. And Micah is getting some deserved recognition, too, with a 2019 New York Foundation award for the Arts Fellow in Music and Sound.

With so much of the sound out of my country of origin the United States ugly, it’s wonderful to hear beautiful algorithmic sounds derived from the nation’s national parks instead.

https://micahfrank.bandcamp.com/album/quetico

Image credit: “Yellowstone 8/07”by stevetulk is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The post Grainstation-C is a free granular tool with ambisonics, and an album to match appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

1000 free Novation presets from Legowelt, Emily Sprague, Shawn Rudiman…

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 7:57 pm

Novation are going patch crazy, with 1000 free artist patches for their Peak synth and newest Summit. And they come from some of our favorite artists.

“Presets,” “artists,” blah blah… but wait, the lineup here includes Legowelt, Craig Williams, Lightbath, Hinako Omori, Emily Sprague, and Shawn Rudiman, plus others to be announced.

Novation use their Components Web interface to deliver updates, content, and expanded functionality to their users, and they’ve been pioneers in innovative use of the tech for that role. That interface has sometimes been in need of a refresh, though, and so the other big news is that they’ve overhauled the UI.

Now you can see the Bank Editor next to content, you can filter presets, and you can choose to see your own stuff alongside Novation’s if you choose. Plus – mercifully – login isn’t mandatory any more (though you’ll need it to authenticate your own content you store online, of course).

Peak and Summit are well suited to some clever patch design, what with multiple synthesis methods simultaneously, modulation, and effects. It’ll be interested to see what they’ve cooked up.

More:

https://novationmusic.com/peak-summit-presets

Speaking of Legowelt and Shawn, flashback time:

The post 1000 free Novation presets from Legowelt, Emily Sprague, Shawn Rudiman… appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Crossover VCV Rack modular: Vult goes hardware, as Erica adds free software

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 6:50 pm

Hardware or software? Yes. Modular synthesizers, of all things, are blurring the line between the two. The popular Vult line of software modules for VCV Rack is going hardware, just as Erica Synths offers its popular hardware in a free software form on the same platform.

VCV Rack has rapidly established itself as a platform for other modules in a way that nothing else has. The software modular is free, with a rich free ecosystem, with only useful add-ons (from the developer and third parties) costing money. It’s also strikingly approachable for developers as well as users.

But that’s in turn leading to some fascinating crossovers.

This week, developer Leonardo Laguna Ruiz announced that his Vult module, which existed only in VCV Rack virtually, is now up for preorders as actual hardware.

Vult Freak incorporates a bunch of different modules in one (thanks, code modeling):

  • Tangents – Steiner-Parker filter containing three different variations.
  • Lateralus – Ladder filter.
  • Nurage – Low pass gate / Borg filter.
  • Ferox – CMOS filter.
  • Vortex – Russian fitler.
  • Unstabile – Circuit bent State Variable filter.
  • Stabile – State Variable filter.
  • Rescomb – Resonant Comb filter.
  • Vorg – MS-20 style filter

Demos:

I’ve used a lot of these in my own musical experiments in Rack, and do they sound good? Yes, they do. (Unstabile and Vortex are particularly delicious for those of us who enjoy rich, manic distortion.)

€225 buys you this stuff as physical device – and frees you from having to mouse around and worry about crashes or running out of CPU, natch.

A community of followers built on the VCV Rack ecosystem now are likely to follow Vult on into hardware. Preorder-ready hardware, seen here.

Maybe it’s the story behind the device that’s just as compelling – a few years developing a language, a couple of years experimenting in VCV Rack, then making the leap into hardware. There’s a bug that bites people who get into buying Eurorack, but there’s one for development, too.

I don’t doubt that some of the loyal users of the software will splurge for the hardware, too. And rather than blowing cash on something, then bolting it into a rack and hoping you can figure it out, the software-first model means many people who do buy Vult Freak will already know how to use it.

With that in mind, it’s also worth mention that Latvian titan of modular Erica Synths, with their expansive catalog, have made their first steps into providing software editions. Head to the Library on the VCV site, and you can grab a collection of Erica modules:

The new Erica offers, in software form – Wavetable VCO and Octasource from the Black series, and DRUMS from the Pico series.

https://vcvrack.com/plugins.html

They’re free of charge; just click ‘+ Free’ and update Rack and you’ll get them. Erica are a long way from porting everything they make in hardware – this is a tiny fraction of the full lineup. But they’re a decent taste of what Erica hardware can do. The Black Wavetable VCO is a uniquely capable oscillator with bitcrush and tons of wave modulation options. Octasource is a unique modulation oscillator, and its interface works differently from others, meaning having it in software form is really fantastic. DRUMS is ridiculously compact as is everything in the fascinating Pico series, but it’s a natural for cramming into virtual rigs.

https://www.ericasynths.lv/

I’ll be curious to see if this attracts some new Erica customers. Erica aren’t the first to do this, either – Befaco, Mutable Instruments (as Audible Instruments), and Music Thing (as Stellare) all offer software renditions of their hardware. It’s not hard to imagine at some point that VCV Rack will have a “buy hardware” button on the software. Softube Modular has software ports, too, of some big brands – Mutable Instruments again, the mighty Doepfer, Buchla, 4ms, and Intellijel all have software modules available.

The big difference is business model: VCV Rack is tending more toward either inexpensive paid modules as software, or free software that serves as a demo/preview of hardware.

A minority of electronic musicians live in a place where they can easily just run to a shop and try gear out. But more than that, software promises to create a new communications link between musicians and creators, year-round. We’ll see if that gives Vult a boost in the crowded modular world.

Check out VCV Rack on all platforms:

https://vcvrack.com/

And if you want a hand getting started, the legendary Jim Aikin has written a free e-book that explains what Rack is and how to use it, plus (the bit I liked most) gives a guide to the jungle of modules out there:

The post Crossover VCV Rack modular: Vult goes hardware, as Erica adds free software appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

August Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – License Renewals, EEO, Music Consent Decree Comments, EAS Test, LPFM NPRM and More

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 4:43 pm

Once upon a time, August was a quiet month in Washington, when everyone went on vacation. Sure, there are plenty of vacations that will happen this coming month, but it seems that regulatory activity no longer takes a break. For example, August 1 is the due date for the filing with the FCC of license renewals for all radio stations (including translators and LPFM stations) in North and South Carolina, and the filing of associated EEO forms for all full power radio stations in those states. With the renewal filing comes the obligation that these stations start airing, on August 1 and August 16, their post-filing announcements informing the public about the submission of the license renewal applications. Radio stations in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia, who filed their renewals on or before June 2, also need to keep running their post-filing announcements on these same dates. Radio stations in Florida, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, who are in the next license renewal group with their renewal applications to be filed by October 1, need to start broadcasting their pre-filing announcements this month, also to run on the 1st and 16th of the month. See our post here on pre-filing announcements.

Commercial and noncommercial full power and Class A Television Stations and AM and FM radio stations in California, Illinois, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Wisconsin that are part of an employment unit with five or more full-time employees must place their annual EEO public inspection file reports in their online public file. Links to those reports should also be placed on the home pages of these station’s websites, if they have a website. The effectiveness of these EEO public file reports, and the EEO programs of which they are a part, are being reviewed by the FCC in a proceeding started by a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking about which we wrote here. Comments on this notice asking for suggestions about how to make the EEO rules more effective are due August 21, with reply comments due by September 5.

August 1 is also the date for the next FCC open meeting, where the FCC will consider a rulemaking on changes to certain LPFM rules. The draft Notice of Proposed Rulemaking also proposes to phase out protections to Channel 6 TV stations from all FM stations, including LPFMs, that operate on the noncommercial portion of the FM band. The FCC thinks that TV digital operations have lessened the need for the protections to be afforded the Channel 6 TV stations from FM stations operating in the adjacent noncommercial FM band. We will write more about this proceeding assuming the FCC adopts the NPRM later this week as expected.

August 7 brings the next Nationwide Test of the EAS system. This test will concentrate on the “daisy chain” system used by broadcasters to relay alerts from one station to another across the country (see our post here). Thus, broadcasters’ performance will be under close scrutiny. Be sure that your system is working, and that you file the post-test ETRS Form 2 on August 7, reporting on whether or not your station successfully received and relayed the test message.

August 9 is the date for filing comments on the Department of Justice’s inquiry into whether changes should be made in the antitrust consent decrees that govern the operations of ASCAP and BMI. We wrote about that proceeding here. It is important to broadcasters because the consent decrees require these performing rights organizations to treat all broadcasters in the same manner, and to impose rates that are reasonable (and provide for court review if ASCAP or BMI cannot come to an agreement with broadcast groups as to whether their rates are reasonable). This is an important proceeding that could have significant financial ramifications on the broadcast industry.

Parts of the FCC’s new FM translator interference resolution process, including allowing translators to change to any available channel to resolve an interference complaint, will take effect on August 13. Other portions of the new rules (including the requirement that complaints about interference come from inside a full-power station’s 45 dbu contour and setting out the minimum number of complaints needed to sustain an interference complaint, require prior approval from the Office of Management and Budget before they can take effect.

Later in the month, we would also expect that the FCC will release its final decision on annual regulatory fees to be paid by broadcasters and all other FCC-regulated entities. As we wrote last month, the fees that the FCC initially proposed are being challenged by broadcasters as the proposed radio fees would increase significantly this year without evident explanation. This year TV regulatory fees are moving to a population coverage-based fee, instead of one based on the DMA in which the station operates. That has resulted in some stations’ proposed fees – especially some VHF stations in major markets – to significantly increase. We will be looking for this fee decision soon, as the fees need to be paid in September, before the October 1 start of the next government fiscal year.

As always, these are just some highlights of the regulatory issues that broadcasters will be looking at this month. Check with your own counsel or legal adviser to make sure that we have not omitted any dates that could be important to your operations this month.

Vigo’s Rida Javed and her brothers are entertaining India, one family at a time – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 8:00 am
Vigo's Rida Javed and her brothers are entertaining India, one family at a time  RadioandMusic.com

MUMBAI: Whether it's portraying an annoying wife, a clingy girlfriend or an over smart friend, Rida Javed fits into these avatars perfectly for her comedy videos.

Priyanka Chopra, Nick Jonas’ virtual PDA session – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 8:00 am
Priyanka Chopra, Nick Jonas' virtual PDA session  RadioandMusic.com

MUMBAI: Priyanka Chopra is setting relationship goals by sharing loved-up photographs with husband and pop star Nick Jonas from her Miami birthday ...

TunePlus Wordpress Theme