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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » The Shock of the Future review – when synths ruled the world


The Shock of the Future review – when synths ruled the world

Delivered... Phil Hoad | Scene | Wed 11 Sep 2019 5:00 pm

A young woman in late-70s Paris explores the thrilling possibilities of electronic music in a drama with a timely feminist slant

From Vangelis to John Carpenter, synthesised music was a liquescent shot in the arm for late 70s/early 80s cinema. Now French musician and producer Marc Collin has mounted this perhaps over-reverential tribute, which makes a timely nod to a nucleus of female pioneers, among them Delia Derbyshire, Laurie Spiegel and Wendy Carlos. If that doesn’t have the needle spiking on the hipster gauge, Alma Jodorowsky – granddaughter of Alejandro – plays Ana, a frustrated jingle-writer in 1978 in Paris who is beginning to see the landscape-shifting possibilities of the wall of synths and sequencers in the flat she is housesitting.

Collin is clearly a stan, the camera lovingly worshipping the banks of dials and knobs, the soundtrack overflowing with the likes of Nitzer Ebb, Throbbing Gristle and Jean-Michel Jarre, the retro-futuristic love-in extending to all manner of directional brown-and-orange furnishings. Ana has a full-blown techgasm when a friend turns up with a Roland CR-78 beatbox.

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