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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » September » 20


Video premiere: Caustic alien dreams and handmade electronics from Balfa

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 6:13 pm

Balfa sucks us into dystopian reveries, as we premiere a new video – and see some of the home-built instruments making such wonderfully acerbic sounds.

First, let’s set the mood with the video, which pairs music artist Balfa with artist/animator Maria Mendes of Portugal. Whatever is rendering in that skin, that’s more or less how my body feels if I give it over to these sounds.

It’s for the track, from this month’s debut LP Perfecta Analogía De La Decadencia. (I bet you got the translation of that one. Full track-by-track album description with extended commentary is on his site.)

Balfa is a Spanish artist who has crafted his debut LP, he says, as an autobiographical journey through Berlin over his four year stay here. (It’s true – those screams of agony you hear, that’s exactly the sound my soul makes when I’m stuck just before closing on a Saturday night in the produce section of the Wrangelstrasse Lidl. But I digress.)

What you get is the raw, exposed crackle and growl of electronics, giving way to abstract broken beats and fragmented landscapes. And then, unexpectedly, he’ll break into a furious, hyperactive groove, in between caves of ambient sound. Those occasional repetitions now qualify things to be called “techno,” but frankly – I’m totally okay with the ongoing dissolution of the term, if it means more experimentation.

The album has the unedited directness of late-night studio psychosis, but it’s always engaging and inventive. The full stream is on HATE; there’s a vinyl LP that then spills over on digital with a couple extra tracks, out earlier this month. Delilirium Candidum of Mexico made the artwork, in a sort of naive-folk cyberpunk style:

And the sounds are unpredictable and show this love for electricity in part because of Balfa’s extensive DIY work. Balfa has been building his own instruments, with a decidedly punk approach (as we like around these here parts at CDM).

Most interesting is this “Yafurula Generator, Revelwaver & Clock” – Atari Punk Console inspired, it seems, mayhem with timers or something like this (I’ll ask for more details, but maybe meanwhile it’s fun to guess):

There’s also this PlayStation-controlled synth:

His live performance – as recently at Eufonic festival – is all about handmade devices and improvisation. On the album, it’s nice hearing those untethered textures mixed with song structures and sounds – a compelling split.

I also quite like this little reveal they did for the cover artwork by Delilirium Candidum:

If this goes anywhere, you can say again you heard it here first – this is BLF001. Now that he’s back in Spain, Balfa promises “BLF Lab” will be an outlet for more of this sort of endeavor:

Balfa establishes his BLF Lab project not only as a space for creative experimentation through craft practices, but also as a base for making music with handcrafted machines and various materials.

We’ll be looking forward to what transpires, Balfa.

www.blf-lab.com

More pictures of his DIY work:

Photo: Maria Louceiro.

Photo: Maria Louceiro.

Photo: Marta Rubio.
Photo: Marta Rubio.

The post Video premiere: Caustic alien dreams and handmade electronics from Balfa appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Reminder – FCC Political Rules Apply to Off-Year Elections for State and Local Offices

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 5:15 pm

While next year’s federal elections are already receiving most of the publicity, I’ve been getting a surprising number of calls about elections this November. While most broadcast stations don’t think about the FCC’s political broadcasting rules in odd numbered years, they should – particularly in connection with state and local political offices.  There are elections for governor in November in Kentucky, Louisiana and Mississippi, and all sorts of state and local elections in different parts of the country. As we have written before, most of the political rules apply to these state and local electoral races so broadcasters need to be paying attention.

Whether the race is for governor or much more locally focused, like elections for state legislatures, school boards or town councils, stations need to be prepared. Candidates for state and local elections are entitled to virtually all of the political broadcasting rights of Federal candidates – with one exception, the right of reasonable access which is reserved solely for Federal candidates. That means that only Federal candidates have the right to demand access to all classes and dayparts of advertising time that a broadcast station has to sell. As we wrote in our summary of reasonable access, here, that does not mean that Federal candidates can demand as much time as they want, only that stations must sell them a reasonable amount of advertising during the various classes of advertising time sold on the station. For state and local candidates, on the other hand, stations don’t need to sell the candidates any advertising time at all. But, if they do, the other political rules apply

That means that if a broadcast station decides to sell advertising time to one candidate in a state or local political race, they must sell it to all candidates for the same race – and be prepared to make available equal amounts of time in equivalent time periods. Stations can decide to make available advertising only in certain dayparts (or on certain stations in a cluster) for state and local races. They can even make different dayparts (or stations) available for different political races, as long as all candidates for the same race are treated the same. So, for instance, a station could decide to offer only spots during weekend and overnight time periods to candidates for the city council, while offering candidates for governor time during all dayparts. A station just needs to treat all legally qualified candidates (including independent and fringe party candidates) for the same state or local race in the same way.

If the time is sold to state and local candidates during the 60 days before the November general election, the time must be sold to the candidate at lowest unit rates. See our summaries of the rules relating to equal time here, and to lowest unit charges here. Similarly, if a station on-air personality decides to run for state or local office (anything from the school board or local planning commission to governor or state legislature), the station needs to consider whether to take that personality off the air, or risk having to provide equal time to all competing applicants – for free – in amounts equivalent to the amount of time that the employee-candidate appeared on the air, even if the employee never mentions his or her candidacy at all. See our articles about this topic here and here.

For more about the political rules, see our Broadcaster’s Guide to Political Broadcasting here. Don’t forget about these political advertising rules – even though this is an odd numbered year!

Nucleya elated over The Remix’s nomination in International Emmy Awards 2019; says ‘It is a very proud moment’ – Times Now

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 2:51 pm
Nucleya elated over The Remix's nomination in International Emmy Awards 2019; says 'It is a very proud moment'  Times Now

Indian EDM artist Udyan Sagar, who is popularly known as Nucleya is elated as his show The Remix has received the nomination for The International Emmy ...

LiveCore is a free low-level, live patching for Reaktor

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 1:31 pm

Reaktor lovers no longer have to be jealous of live coders – now they get a performance-ready, free, low-level tool of their own. Sonic mayhem awaits you.

Okay, first – “live coding” doesn’t necessarily have to mean typing. Text is just one way to represent software logic, that is – and tools like Reaktor (and Pd, and Max, and TouchDesigner) simply use a “dataflow” visual representation for that same logic.

Reaktor Blocks now gives you a high-level, Eurorack hardware-style way to patch. But there hasn’t been anything that can exploit the low-level, high power DSP capabilities of Reaktor in real-time.

Enter LiveCore. The goal: “inreasing liveness” when you work with Reaktor, so you can actually patch live. It’s the work of co-creators David Alexander (@freeeco) and Jack Armitage (@jarmitage), and it’s all free and open source on GitHub (provided you have a Reaktor license, of course). And it’s capable of some seriously awesome musical madness:

You actually don’t need to know that much about Core, Reaktor’s low-level DSP objects, to use LiveCore. It effectively makes Core more powerful for existing users, and gives an entry point to people who may have avoided it.

LiveCore gives you a set of modules, each insanely optimized (just a few bytes compiled, and efficient on your machine’s processor). In the first release you’ll find the following – and the developers say more are on the way:

  • Phase Driver
  • Sequencer (quantizes phase Driver Output to make patterns)
  • Splitter
  • Gate
  • Mixer
  • Limiter (not like a traditional audio studio limiter – it’s actually more like a simple two-stage envelope)
  • Waveshaper
  • Reader (intended for sample playback, from a table)

And, like, holy s*** this idea is cool. Everything is built around the Phase Driver – you make one-shot triggers or ramps with that, and then do all your signal mangling and such with the other modules to create interesting patterns for sounds.

It’s also refreshing to have a modular environment that isn’t tied up in a whole bunch of idiosyncratic hardware modules. If you look at the display, it’s very nerdy in appearance, sure. But the actual use of this is so simple that it seems open to exploration, even for people who don’t normally think about patterns in terms of signal flow.

And this looks like a really unique way to approach patterns. That Waveshaper, for instance, can be used to create irregularities and interest in patterns. (There’s also nothing stopping you from routing this to a patch built in Reaktor Blocks, if you really want to.)

This project is brand new, so please don’t immediately bug the developers with too many questions. Documentation is mostly still forthcoming, so you’re pretty much on your own. It seems like they’re progressing quickly, though, and I think you’ll agree – this was too cool not to immediately share.

https://github.com/freeeco/livecore

The post LiveCore is a free low-level, live patching for Reaktor appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show – Zee News

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 12:56 pm
DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show  Zee News

New Delhi: Indian electronic music producer-DJ Udyan Sagar, popular as Nucleya, is proud to be a part of the show "The Remix" that has received a nomination ...

DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show – Outlook India

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 11:07 am
DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show  Outlook India

DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 11:02 am
DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show  RadioandMusic.com

MUMBAI: Indian electronic music producer-DJ Udyan Sagar, popular as Nucleya, is proud to be a part of the show, The Remix that has received a nomination for ...

DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show – Free Press Journal

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 8:00 am
DJ Nucleya proud of his International Emmy nominated show  Free Press Journal
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