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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » October » 09


Another $15,000 Fine Proposed for Missing Issues Programs Lists – And a Fine for a Late-Filed Renewal

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 9 Oct 2019 4:20 pm

A pattern is being established – $15,000 and a short-term, 2-year license renewal seem to have become the standard penalty for stations that are missing all of their Quarterly Issues Programs Lists for a license renewal term.  Yesterday, the FCC’s Media Bureau issued a proposed fine to a Virginia station that had failed to complete any Quarterly Issues Programs lists during its 8-year license renewal term.  The proposed $15,000 fine, and a renewal for only 2 years rather than the normal 8-year term, is the same penalty proposed two weeks ago in another case (which we wrote about here) where a station had similar problems.  These two cases seem to announce that this is the base penalty for stations that simply have not bothered to complete any Quarterly Issues Programs lists.

Yet to be seen is what happens when a broadcaster has completed some but not all of the required public file paperwork.  Last week, the FCC granted many of the license renewal applications from the first round of radio license renewals (for stations in Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia).  The granted applications were the ones that had few if any problems.  With the FCC having acted at the two extremes – renewal grants for those with no issues and $15,000 fines and short-term renewals for those with significant issues – the Commission now needs to fill in the holes, deciding what to do with those applicants that fell somewhere between these two extremes.  Watch for decisions from the FCC to see whether penalties are imposed on stations that fall in the middle in coming months.

One of those problems is what to do with stations that miss the FCC filing deadline for the license renewal application.  Yesterday, the FCC’s Media Bureau announced a $1500 proposed fine for an LPFM station that missed the renewal filing deadline – filing about a month late without any excuse.  This penalty is consistent with actions in past renewal cycles (see our article here), but more significant penalties or even cancelled licenses can result where licensees don’t catch their mistake before the FCC does.  Watch for additional clarification from the FCC as to the penalties associated with other issues discovered at renewal time – and if your renewal has not yet come up, take action now to learn from these actions and to avoid these penalties.

Accusonus Rhythmiq is an AI assistant that works with your rhythms and control

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 9 Oct 2019 4:20 pm

“AI” in the popular imagination has become a vision of machines making the music. Rhythmiq is a new plug-in that’s the opposite – software that promises to let you do more with your own grooves.

Rhythm is one of the areas where machine learning seems already to excel. The science around these AI techniques at the moment focuses on just this sort of pattern recognition – it’s powerful for analyzing time-domain nuance, like grooves. So for anyone who complains about the cookie-cutter impact of “on the grid” music software, AI might actually offer some hope. “The grid” no longer needs to be a mechanical, perfect division of the beat or repetitive groove and swing. You can train machines on recognizing more sophisticated patterns, and producing variations accordingly.

I’ll go into a deep dive as far as how Rhythmiq works at another time, but you can certainly count it as an early attempt to chart music software into just these waters. And yeah, the whole idea here is to get more out of your own loops. Accusonus have even produced an elegant-looking interface with hands-on controls so you can dial in what you want interactively.

The basic workflow is this:

Add a loop. Yep, you can use your own sounds.

Make variations on that loop, by turning an on-screen knob (or mapping that to hardware) – essentially guiding the software algorithms where you want them to go.

Play the variations in real-time as you jam, even without looking at the screen, for fills, breaks, build-ups, drops, and, uh, whatever else you want as you play.

Yep, it has controls on it. So this isn’t just a ghost in the shell – the whole idea is to give you something you can play. It’s machines as more interactive, not less.

This is in stark contrast to the primitive way you might be tempted to work with loop- and sample-driven software and hardware. That use case is more like: start a loop, let that loop play repetitively forever, and attempt to jam over top of that loop as it gets progressively more annoying. (Whee!) Sure, that works really well for music that relies on repetitive patterns – behold, the mystery of the techno 4/4 kick. But it applies pretty poorly for everything else.

This also demonstrates that the real-world applications of AI may be more sophisticated, and more appealing to actual musicians, than some of the popular fantasy. We’ve been told for years that AI needs to be autonomous – that it needs to replace us as humans, or come up with ideas when we’re uninspired. If you talk to actual data scientists working in real-world applications of machine learning, though, they will routinely still refer to their work as “AI” without being concerned with this autonomy. Why? Well, as far as I’ve been able to ascertain:

  • a) because it’s not presently possible to make that sort of autonomous machine code, and
  • b) because there isn’t necessarily a real world demand for it.

This should particularly obvious in music, however. I think musicians want the machines to make the music for them in the same way that they want video games to play themselves, or to watch someone else doing it.

No, if you’re willing to invest in music technology, odds are that you do have some inspiration and ideas and you do actually enjoy, you know, making music yourself. Where the frustration comes in is that software works in ways that are often pretty foreign to the way we hear music. And that’s why Rhythmiq is part of a promising direction in adding intelligence to the music.

In short, this isn’t about making you dumber. It’s about making your music software smarter – more like you. Even as beginners, you are already pretty damned smart when it comes to understanding rhythm. (Seriously. Humans are amazing.)

Anyway, that’s the concept. Actually making this work involves some deep research and technology on one side, and requires some extensive testing in user music making on the other. I’ll be investigating both sides of that shortly. (I’ve already started looking at pre-release versions of the software.)

One note – this does still rely on audio content. That means you do have some of the audible artifacts of deriving portions of the sound from the larger sound material, which gives the loops some of that lo-fi, IDM sound – which you might love or not. It seems there is also potential in driving variations in MIDI (or other timing information) alone, and then triggering slices in a more conventional way.

But this is a huge leap forward for Accusonus’ technology, and delivers on some of what we saw previously in their Regroover plug-in. (See links below, which also go into some of the AI behind this.)

Also, stay tuned, as I’m part of a team continuing to explore the applications of AI and music. Following our work with GAMMA Festival in St. Petersburg, Russia, we head next to a partnership in November with MUTEK.JP in Tokyo, again pairing data scientists and technologists with musicians and curators and lots of people fitting several of those descriptions at once.

Rhythmiq is available today. It’s US$99 through the end of October, $149 after that. And you can try a 14-day test version, so you don’t have to trust me or the developers or anyone else about how well it works; you can find out yourself.

You’ll be better off in certain hosts than others – yep, try Reaper and its free evaluation version if all else fails. According to Accusonus:

Compatible and fully tested: Ableton Live 10, Apple Logic Pro X

Compatible: FL Studio 20, Presonus Studio One, Cockos Reaper

https://accusonus.com/products/rhythmiq

There are a couple of marketing videos, but I actually think you should start with the playlist of tutorial videos to see how this works – especially if you’re trying the demo:

Here are the developers talking a bit about their thinking going into this, but I’ll try to get a little deeper with them about how it all works and why go this way:

Previously:

The post Accusonus Rhythmiq is an AI assistant that works with your rhythms and control appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FCC Extends Deadline for LPTV and TV Translators to File for Reimbursement for Repacking Expenses – FM Filing Deadline Not Extended

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 9 Oct 2019 4:17 pm

Yesterday, the FCC extended the deadline for LPTV stations and TV translators to file for reimbursement for their expenses incurred in changing channels because of the repacking of the TV band following the TV incentive auction.  These stations were given an extra month until November 15 to file these requests.  See our articles here and here for more information about the reimbursement program.  It is important to note that FM stations, which also can file for reimbursement of expenses incurred from having to change their facilities co-located on TV towers as a result of the repacking, have not been granted any extension.  FM stations still need to seek reimbursement by October 15, the original filing deadline.  FM stations seeking reimbursement need to be working now to meet next week’s deadline.

Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood: ‘Instead of cocaine, hook me up with a recorder group!’

Delivered... Andrew Male | Scene | Wed 9 Oct 2019 1:50 pm

He has composed a Prom and scored Paul Thomas Anderson films. As he launches his own classical record label, the guitarist reveals how it all started with the humble recorder

Jonny Greenwood is looking well, all things considered. There’s a thin triangle of stubble on his top lip that the morning razor has missed and a slight bleariness around the eyes, but it’s unlikely anyone spotting Radiohead’s lead guitarist in the corner of this London cafe at 10am would guess that he hasn’t been to bed for 24 hours. “No, not really had any sleep,” he mutters, running a hand through his shiny dark hair. “Hour, maybe?”

He’s here to discuss his new classical music record label, Octatonic, but at midnight he was taking a bow at the Albert Hall following a meticulously curated Prom. It was the culmination of his second life as a composer, a 16-year career that has seen him write for the London Sinfonietta, work as composer-in-residence for BBC Concert Orchestra, collaborate with the Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki and create remarkable scores for the films of Lynne Ramsay and Paul Thomas Anderson.

Paul Thomas Anderson sent me some film clips and I thought: 'It's going to be nice to be in a band with this person'

Volume 1: Partita No 2 in D minor and Volume 2: Industry, Water are out on Jonny Greenwood’s Octatonic Records.

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A Conversation With Grounded Theory Resident Pablo Mateo About His Journey Through Techno

Delivered... svt303 | Scene | Wed 9 Oct 2019 12:32 pm

The post A Conversation With Grounded Theory Resident Pablo Mateo About His Journey Through Techno appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

‘It’s a new golden age’: Radio 3 launches video game music show

Delivered... Keith Stuart | Scene | Wed 9 Oct 2019 7:00 am

Presenter Jessica Curry says she wants to prove it’s not all about soundtracking battle scenes – there are plenty of beautiful, relaxing sounds, too

Radio 3 is launching a new weekly programme dedicated to video game soundtracks. Running from Saturday 26 October, the hour-long show will be presented by composer Jessica Curry, who won a Bafta for her work with UK studio The Chinese Room and created and presented Classic FM’s video game music programme, High Score.

“[BBC presenter and journalist] Tom Service and his producer Brian Jackson came to interview me for Radio 3 at Chinese Room a couple of years ago, and we all really hit it off,” said Curry. “Tom’s an avid gamer and there was a definite feeling of excitement about the gaming scene and the music that’s being composed for games.

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