Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2019 » November » 25


Tarik Barri, live visualist to Thom Yorke, in videos and a reddit AMA

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 25 Nov 2019 10:22 pm

The rise of the audiovisualist: Tarik Barri regularly takes the stage with Thom Yorke and contributed to the Grammy-nominated Anima. And now, here’s his work and the chance to ask him anything.

Tarik will hit the infamous Reddit AMA on the Radiohead channel Tuesday the 26th, if you’ve got burning questions. But let’s have a look first at his work:

A video interview on his work, on the fantastic live visual QA documentary series Psst:

Perhaps the best way to see his partnership with Thom Yorke is in this video on the Jimmy Kimmel show:

Working with the amazing Iranian artist Sote, he produced an AV collaboration:

His collab with Lea Barikant is also into a new iteration:

And lastly, a trailer for ANIMA, for which he did projections (and which you can check on Netflix, natch):

Have at it tomorrow:

The post Tarik Barri, live visualist to Thom Yorke, in videos and a reddit AMA appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

MeeBlip Black Friday: thru5 kit for $9.99 and geode synth $129

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 25 Nov 2019 8:47 pm

Overwhelmed with music toys? We can get you a bass synth that sounds like no other – plus a way to connect all your gear for $10. Happy Black Friday to you.

geode: $129 synth hardware, ships free

First, there’s our very own MeeBlip geode hardware synth. It’s just US$129, and this week only, we’ll ship it to nearly the whole world for free. There’s not another bass synth that sounds like it, in 2019 or 1979 or any other year. Plug-and-play USB connects MIDI and power with one connection – even to a smartphone (with adapter). The sound itself features biting oscillators and a crunchy analog filter.

So if you’re looking for a little sonic inspiration and a unique bass sound for yourself – or as a gift – now’s the time to grab this. Sale lasts this week only.

MeeBlip geode synth [MeeBlip Shop]

thru5: US$9.99 MIDI splitter kit

It wouldn’t be Black Friday deal without a ridiculous offer for a limited time, so we’ve gone one more for you. Our thru5 MIDI splitter kit is easy to assemble, and splits one MIDI input to five outputs, so you can connect all your gear.

And for this week only, it’s yours for just US$9.99 – a perfect Secret Santa gift or stocking stuffer or Hanukkah present for someone you know who’s handy with a soldering iron or wants to learn. Or it’s a way to get your studio in order for a winter cleaning.

Shipping if you’re just buying thru5 is $3.95 to USA, $5.95 international, varies in Canada. (Free with orders above $99- so, for instance, you could add in a geode!)

thru5 MIDI splitter kit [MeeBlip shop]

Hurry! These deals end on December 2 – or while supplies last!

For more background on these products:

The post MeeBlip Black Friday: thru5 kit for $9.99 and geode synth $129 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

NAB Seeks Reconsideration of FCC’s Clarification of Issue Advertising Public Disclosure Requirements – Rules Remain in Effect Though Some Clarification Provided

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 25 Nov 2019 5:55 pm

Last month, the FCC issued what it termed a “clarification” of the obligations of broadcasters to disclose in their public inspection files each and every candidate and issue discussed in any Federal issue ad.  We wrote about the Clarification here.  That decision prompted many questions among broadcasters as to how they would comply with the requirement to uniformly identify every issue in political ads, when that judgement might well be quite subjective.  The National Association of Broadcasters apparently agreed, and filed a Petition for Reconsideration of the Clarification, available here.  Hearst Television, Graham Media, Nexstar, Fox, Tegna, and Scripps joined the NAB in filing the Petition.

The NAB’s Petition raises numerous issues about the FCC decision.  It suggests that the Commission did not have the power to make what most in broadcasting thought was a change in the rules without first soliciting public comment on the proposed changes.  The Petition also argues that the Clarification sets up requirements that will be almost impossible to meet.  The FCC stated that “a political issue of national importance” (which is what an issue ad must discuss in order to trigger the disclosure obligations) includes anything pending before Congress.  The NAB asks how a broadcaster is supposed to know about every issue that may be pending before Congress?  The NAB also expresses concern about the catch-all determination in the Clarification stating that political issues of national importance can go beyond just pending legislation or federal political candidates to include any political issue that is subject to discussion and debate at a national level.  The NAB argues that this could encompass almost anything except the most hyperlocal issue (e.g., a school bond issue).  All sorts of advertising could end up being swept up into this definition. 

The FCC suggests that the definition be significantly narrowed and focus only on ads addressing national political actors in a position to take actions on a national stage.  That would also avoid the obligation imposed by the Clarification to treat state issue ads as Federal issue ads if they mention federal issues (e.g., a PAC ad attacking a candidate for governor based on his or her past record in Congress, or his or her lack of support for the President).

The NAB’s Petition also asks for a clarification as to whether the decision applies to candidate ads, as well as those from third-party buyers (e.g., PACs, unions, political parties, corporations, and other advocacy groups).  To some extent, this issue was clarified in a webinar on political broadcasting that I conducted for 16 state broadcast associations on November 21.  There, two representatives of the FCC’s Media Bureau Political Programming Staff, when asked if the Clarification applied to candidate as well as issue ads, pointed to footnote 24 in the Clarification which states,

[s]ection 315(e)(1) of the Act requires licensees to maintain records for two types of requests for the purchase of political advertising time.  The first type concerns requests for advertising time that are “made by or on behalf of a legally qualified candidate for public office.”  47 U.S.C. § 315(e)(1)(A).  The second type concerns requests for advertising time by all other persons and which communicate a message relating to “any political matter of national importance.”  47 U.S.C. § 315(e)(1)(B).  The complaints that are the subject of this Order relate to the second type of request.

To me, that reference to footnote 24 shows that the decision was intended only to address issue ads, not those bought by candidates or their authorized campaign committees.  Obviously, ask your own counsel for guidance on this and other issues about the FCC’s Clarification.

While the NAB’s Petition raises many important issues, the Clarification remains in effect.  The Commission took over two years to issue the Clarification, after rescinding previous advice given on these issues by the FCC’s Media Bureau (see our article here).  While we would hope that consideration of the NAB’s Petition will not take that long, these are complicated issues that may well take time to review.  In the interim, stations must do their best to understand the requirements of the Clarification and implement those requirements now in their day-to-day operations.

Behringer adds a 4-voice Moog; here’s everything they’re cloning now (late 2019)

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 25 Nov 2019 2:41 pm

Behringer will remake the rare Wasp and now just announced a 4-voice paraphonic Moog clone. Having trouble keeping track? Here’s a recap.

Behringer radar

With so many remakes now shipping or teased, the hard part may be just keeping track what Behringer are doing, what’s available already, and what’s coming. Let’s step back and just review what products are currently available or inbound. Competitors should ignore this list at their own peril.

This is what Tom Whitwell at the former Music thing (then a blog, now a modular brand) called the Behringer “photocopier.” But whereas that until recently was a disparaging remark, fans of the brand now eagerly follow these cut-rate remakes. So while I say “clone” rather than the company’s preferred “authentic reproduction,” there’s no doubt that the intention is to do these as remakes.

What’s remarkable is how many of these synths came from 1979 alone, or within a year or two.

Oh yeah, also – despite the company’s claims, while this hardware is far cheaper than most of the used equivalent originals, there are often inexpensive alternatives of new or similar instruments. So let’s get into both what Behringer is offering, and whether you might consider other options before spending your hard-earned scratch:

Behringer RD-8

Based on: Roland TR-808 (1980, and not, sadly, the Soviet rocket RD-8)

List/street: $524.99 / $400

New features: What Behringer added here mostly was in the sequencer, which like the other remakes has some more advanced features. There’s also a sort of envelope follower called the Wave Designer.

The competition: Arturia’s DrumBrute Impact is actually cheaper, at around $300. It’s got fewer outs, but an advanced sequencer and a distinctive sound. Roland’s TR-8S or even a used buy on a TR-8 give you faders and additional effects (plus on the TR-8S, the ability to load your own samples), and could still be a worthy upgrade – with effective TR modeled sounds. Roland’s Boutique TR-08 on the other hand looks comparatively lean versus the Behringer, and it’d be nice to see the company that made the original 808 respond with something more competitive at the entry level. You can have my TR-8S when you pry it out of my cold, d– actually, my hot, sweaty, fader tweaking fingers.

Behringer TD-3

Based on: Roland TB-303 (1981)

List/street: $224.99 / $150

New features: The arpeggiator is the main addition here, plus a distortion switch, but basically this is a bare-bones 303 clone – at an insanely cheap price.

The competition: There are loads of 303 remakes out there, analog and digital. Roland for their part has the Boutique with a very useful delay and semi-useful distortion (theirs with an actual knob, not just a switch). But to my knowledge, the only real competition at this price is a software plug-in. Or get a KORG volca series synth for a different sound; even the volca bass is somewhat refreshingly not a 303. Oh yeah, or think about a two-oscillator bass synth, but I’m biased. Yes, of all of these – here is the one where Behringer can be expected to totally own a category, maybe to the point of us winding up with way too many acid tracks in about a year.

Behringer Model D

Based on: Moog Minimoog (1970)

List/street: $449.99 / $300

New features: As with the others, this is mostly about squeezing this in the Eurorack chassis, but there’s also a new overdrive circuit. Just remember, like the original, you have to give the analog circuits time to warm up.

The competition: You can get a surprising number of capable synths these days for $300 or even less, but a Minimoog remake from Moog will certainly be a luxury item. That said, if you’re willing to spend a little more, you can get something like the Moog Sub Phatty for around $500 on a Black Friday sale – with keyboard. It’s not a Minimoog model D, but it also moves into some new sonic territory, and you get the feeling of owning an actual Moog. That’s not to sneeze at the Model D – this thing has made a big impact, and maybe its biggest competition comes from Behringer itself, with the also inexpensive (and far more patchable/open-ended) Neutron.

Behringer Odyssey

Based on: ARP Odyssey (1972)

List/street: $749.99 / $600

New features: Digital multi-effects are the main edition here, plus the arp/sequencer and onboard storage and digital I/O on the others. The Odyssey is also a keyboard synth, unlike the other Eurorack things in this list —

Competition: – but it goes up against KORG’s Arp Odyssey reissue, made in collaboration with the synth’s original creators (if at a higher cost).

Behringer MS-1

Based on: Roland SH-101 (1982)

List/street: $494.99 / $400

New features: These are the most sensible additions of the bunch. Behringer chose to add the thing the 101 owners modded themselves; namely, FM and waveforms (plus MIDI, of course). Actually, that begs the question of why Behringer didn’t add the 303 sound mods to that remake, but – hey, maybe someone else also wants to remake the 303 now, too? I’m sure 303 remakes will never die.

The competition: Behringer on this one did what Roland didn’t do – make a remake of the 101 with full-sized keys and a standard handle option for keytar-style playing. Roland chose to go with the tiny Boutique format. On the other hand, the SH-01A is a four-voice instrument, which winds up being really useful in conjunction with its triggers and sequencer. Now if Roland would just offer that in a full-sized keytar option, it seems like they’d have a hit. I might still buy the SH-01A for something small and four voice, though. (Don’t send letters. I know I like small things and digital synths more than some of our … readers. Ahem.)

Behringer VC340

List/street: $899.99 / $700

Based on: Roland VP-330 (1979)

New features: Just the usual I/O additions – and they cut off an octave on the keyboard to save space.

The competition: For once, Behringer is the more expensive option, believe it or not (apart from an astronomically pricey original VP-330). The Roland Boutique VP-03 is a solid unit at a fraction of this price – it seems new hardware stock is mostly gone, but they fetch around $300 used (without the keyboard, so around $400 with). Sure, it’s digital, but the sound is good; mainly it’s down to whether you want to save some money. Roland’s JD-Xi is also a vocoder for $500 and is a far more flexible and powerful synthesizer, though the design has all the charm of something it looks like you’d find on sale in a Guitar Center on the Death Star. (Dunno, maybe Kylo Ren had this keyboard in the emo rock band he played on the side while studying the Dark Side.)

If all you want is a vocoder, even the Roland VT-4 box is an option for only a couple hundred bucks; its predecessor the VT-3 you might be able to get used, like, for free. Now, maybe an analog recreation is more serious but… well, I leave it to you to decide how serious you want to get about a vocoder/string synth unitasker. But yes, Behringer are the only ones with something really like the original.

For that reason, this is kind of the most rational of a lot of the choices here. But it’s a vocoder/string synth, so “rational” depends on whether that’s something you need.

Further out – clones inbound

Behringer POLY D

Based on: Behringer Model D, basically

Price: Unknown

Shipping date: unknown

New features: This is what happens if you take the Model D, put it in a new case with a keyboard, and make it 4-voice analog paraphonic (there’s just one filter) instead of monophonic. And it probably tips Behringer’s hand as far as what you should expect from the other models here – they’ll gradually translate the Eurorack-case monophonic models to 4-voice models with keyboards, since they’ve already plucked the low-hanging fruit of what people most recognize in vintage brands.

As with past Behringer outings, though, they’re teasing some time before they’re shipping. The risk: people might defer purchase of their products. The more likely outcome: people might defer purchase of competing products.

Behringer PRO-1

Based on: Sequential Circuits Pro-One

Preorder price: $350

Shipping date: unknown

New features: Arp, sequencer, Eurorack chassis – you’re seeing the pattern. There’s also a “drone mode” switch.

The competition: It’s a bit painful when Behringer takes on small, independent makers like Dave Smith and Tom Oberheim. The new Sequential (formerly Dave Smith Instruments) has lots of beautiful new designs. But if you’re on a $350 budget, you can get the wonderful Evolver or Tetra, for example, unique and original Dave Smith-designed sound modules. Or save up your money for a more advanced polysynth based on the ideas behind the Prophet series. Or there’s the Pioneer AS-1, which is a single-voice version of the Prophet-6. I think these come closer to the 21st century vision Dave’s got, and they’re worth supporting for that reason. Oh yeah, and you can buy them now, rather than waiting on the PRO-1.

Behringer WASP DELUXE

Based on: Electronic Dream Plant (EDP) Wasp (1978)

Preorder price: $300

Shipping date: unknown

New features: Behringer went with a desktop sound module and didn’t reproduce the membrane keyboard edition of the first Wasp. This otherwise mostly looks like that hardware, though. It does MIDI and USB now, like the other stuff here.

The competition: There’s not really another Wasp remake that I know of, or anything that close. On the other hand, the Arturia MicroFreak is also a digital-analog hybrid, does way more in sounds, and comes with an innovative keyboard, so to me it’s a better (and more forward-thinking) use of your $300. There’s also the feature-packed Behringer Crave for $50 less than this, available now, so it’s hard to imagine preordering unless you’re really a die-hard fan of the original.

Check the history of the original, though; there were tons of interesting variations.

Behringer UB-Xa

Based on: Oberheim OB-X (1979)

Status: Unknown

I’m not sure we’ve had any news of this one since it showed up at Superbooth in the spring? Anyone?

And the rest…

If you’re KORG, Roland, Polivoks, Black Corporation (maybe their CS-80 Deckard’s Dream, maybe Kimiji) … it seems like Behringer is coming for you, or wants to. See previously:

Also, now they want to get into VST plug-ins?

Fear of clones?

It’s clear at this point that the Music Tribe (Behringer) is leveraging both analog circuitry and some chips that allow it to inexpensively reproduce popular models. And they’ve built a bigger team to do engineering alongside their own manufacturing operation in China. I think they’ve even taken to using the word “clone” in passing on social media.

Because these are now clones of fairly ancient products, this product strategy in itself wouldn’t make the company controversial. Rather, it’s Behringer’s aggressive strategy in regards to competitors, press, PR, and intellectual property that have made it divisive in the synth business. As I noted last week, that includes the recent move of registering trademarks actively owned by competitors. Not only does KORG definitely own and actively use Mono/Poly, but we’ve confirmed even the Polivoks name is registered and used on an active product.

There’s also a deeper question here, and it’s not just about Behringer. As both analog and digital synthesis has become more affordable, will we use that inexpensive power to make new things, or recreate old ones? So far, Behringer has demonstrated that recognized products like the 303, 808, and Minimoog go more viral in social media than new synths. And so far, companies like Roland and other original brands who made this products haven’t succeeded in stopping Behringer from naming and dressing up their products to look like the vintage products. That opens the door to even other manufacturers easily undercutting historic brands and smaller boutique makers on price.

But it’s unclear, once synth fans have stocked up on well-known items like the 303, whether this cheap remake trend will be sustainable.

In the meantime, back to new things.

The post Behringer adds a 4-voice Moog; here’s everything they’re cloning now (late 2019) appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

‘It’s more important than family’: the music scene keeping Bristol weird

Delivered... Alastair Shuttleworth | Scene | Mon 25 Nov 2019 11:15 am

By blending noise, punk and techno, the ‘misfits and weirdos’ of Bristol are shaking the city out of its trip-hop nostalgia – in various states of nudity

In the smoke-filled basement of Bristol’s Brunswick Club, the T-shirts are off for Giant Swan. The duo coax unearthly noise from a web of drum machines and guitar effects pedals; as Robin Stewart’s robotic howls and Harry Wright’s clattering beats resolve into techno, their audience of peers in Bristol’s music community disrobe from the sweat and explode into dance.

For the family of artists in the room, in January 2018 at the last festival by Howling Owl Records, this closing show marks the start of a new chapter – one that has been moving into the spotlight ever since.

Continue reading...

‘It’s more important than family’: the music scene keeping Bristol weird

Delivered... Alastair Shuttleworth | Scene | Mon 25 Nov 2019 11:15 am

By blending noise, punk and techno, the ‘misfits and weirdos’ of Bristol are shaking the city out of its trip-hop nostalgia – in various states of nudity

In the smoke-filled basement of Bristol’s Brunswick Club, the T-shirts are off for Giant Swan. The duo coax unearthly noise from a web of drum machines and guitar effects pedals; as Robin Stewart’s robotic howls and Harry Wright’s clattering beats resolve into techno, their audience of peers in Bristol’s music community disrobe from the sweat and explode into dance.

For the family of artists in the room, in January 2018 at the last festival by Howling Owl Records, this closing show marks the start of a new chapter – one that has been moving into the spotlight ever since.

Continue reading...
TunePlus Wordpress Theme