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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January


Alternate African Reality: reorient your listening with this terrific electronic compilation

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Labels,Scene | Fri 31 Jan 2020 7:02 pm

Don’t miss out on music – speaking of getting Africa back on your listening list, here’s an extraordinary, wide-reaching compilation of some of the most adventurous sounds from Africa and the diaspora.

Africa, it goes without saying, is a big place – uh, really big, 30.3 million km² or so, even before you get into artists moving elsewhere. (To misquote Douglas Adams, “you just won’t believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it’s a long way down the road to the chemist’s, but that’s just peanuts to Africa.”) But maybe thinking of music on the scale of continents and hemispheres is well suited to today’s interconnected age, as networks of artists and interchange span even bigger areas.

In any event, don’t expect this is some tokenized, surface-deep look at music duct-taped together from a massive land area. Alternate African Reality is but the latest in a series of superb compilations from Cedrik Fermont, aka C-drík (Belgium/DR Congo). There are few people as voracious and refined in their musical diet than Cedrik – even though he makes music as a solo artist, he’s constantly deep into discovery. To me, he’s emblematic of the best of how we can redefine what it means to be an artist in the Internet age – where creativity isn’t shut off from the outside, but partly about what you support and connect.

And that also means that Cedrik has had some chance to iterate on how to make a compilation on this scale, and where to find music.

The whole beauty of this sort of project is that the work is never done, there’s always too much music, the cup overflows with sound, and all of that is brilliant. But that means you should not only grab this comp, but also check out Cedrik’s platform Syrphe, “mostly but not exclusively focused onto experimental, electronic, noise music from Asia and Africa.”

The regional focus can shift all over the place in those categories, including the Middle East – Lebanon I see on the top of the list – but it’s all just generally great music, and stuff that often gets missed. Press in London focuses on musicians around London, and so on. I don’t even know that that’s a bad thing in and of itself, in that it is meaningful for some writers to talk about the scene around them. But it is equally essential that someone like Cedrik can balance out your inputs and give you fresh perspective, for anyone who loves musical discovery.

Here’s where to go for that – there’s a blog (time to dust off the RSS readers, folks):

https://syrphe.wordpress.com/

The blog is the best, but since we are on Facebook, it’s also nice to let electronic music take over what the Algorithm gives you, so see the Facebook group and page, too:

Syrphe – Experimental, noise, electronic, avant garde in Africa & Asia

https://www.facebook.com/Syrphe/

There’s so much stuff on Syrphe that it deserves another post, but meanwhile, have at the compilation. Just going to paste the full text, as it’s all worth reading. It’s been great to work with someone like Joseph aka KMRU a few times now, and equally nice to get some new names in here.

Alternate African Reality is a follow-up to several compilations I have published on Syrphe since 2007 (the first one, Beyond Ignorance and Borders included various artists from Africa and Asia), and even earlier on my defunct tape label in the 1990s (the last tape, Archives Humaines vol.1, was published in 1996 and included 25 artists from 25 countries, including non-Western ones : South Africa, Japan, Chile, Brazil).

Alternate African Reality could be seen as a drastic improvement of 30.2, a compilation released in 2012. The CD included nine artists from Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Egypt, Angola, Mauritius, South Africa, Réunion and Madagascar/France. But even if I was very happy with the result, I always thought I should do a deeper research, and another issue I faced was the fact that I didn’t manage to include any women in the project.

Travelling and touring throughout parts of Africa allowed me to meet many more artists than what I ever expected and pushed me to work on this new release.
This time, the end result reveals a more global compilation that could be compared to Uchronia, a compilation that includes 49 artists and bands from 32 Asian countries and the diaspora in the field of so called experimental music.
Alternate African Reality is nonetheless musically more diverse, including abstract but also beat-oriented music such as ambient, electronica, electroacoustic, noise, singeli, bass music, industrial hip hop, etc.

It includes 32 artists and bands from 24 African countries and the diaspora, and last but not least, 14 women are among those vibrant musicians and composers.

Of course the artists included on the compilation only represent a fraction of the African electronic music world, and the listeners should not believe that nothing exists outside of those countries.
Electronic, and, at a lower extend depending on where you look for, experimental music do exist in many other African countries.

I wish that this project will open some eyes and ears and also create more connections and networks.

You will find more information, contacts, biographies and a short essay in a PDF available with the whole compilation if you purchase the CDs or digital files.
Biographies, contacts and websites are also available on this page when you click on “info” next to each track.
You can also have a look at this database that contains more than 3000 references about African and Asian composers, musicians, labels, magazines and so on. syrphe.com/african&asian_database.htm

If for some valid reasons you cannot afford to buy this release, you can send a message and explain why and I might send you a download code.

I deeply thank all the artists involved and also those who for one reason or another could not participate this time as well as all the people who supported me and provided help and advises to make this project happen, those who hosted and invited me during all the travels I made throughout Africa : the Nyege Nyege team in Kampala, Mass Alexandria/Berit Schuck in Alexandria, East African Records Studios/David Cecil and his family in Kampala, Esaete (Naomi) in Kampala, Houdini in Kampala, Lukas Ligeti, Ignacio Priego, Rhéa Dally, Yebo! Contemporary Art Gallery in Ezulwini, the Rock House in Mbabane, Ground Zero – Marley Coffee in Cape Town, Chiharu Mizukami, Chihiro Sato, Paweł Kuźma, Lynda Kansas, Tengal Drilon, Jamir Adiong and his family, Vilho Nuumbala, Kamila Metwali, Sharon Tan, Olivier Moreau, Christopher Kirkley/Sahel Sounds, Nenad Vujić, David Kerr/Sign Records, Memory Biwa, Essia Mestiri, PJ/slowfidelity and many more, you know who you are !

Cedrik Fermont

The track order on the physical release differs from the one of the digital release.

Mash (Tunisia)
Pö (France/Ghana)
[MONRHEA] + Ejuku (Kenya/Uganda)
Jako Maron (Réunion)
Robert Machiri (Zimbabwe)
Ujjaya (France/Madagascar)
Ibukun Sunday (Nigeria)
KMRU (Kenya)
Cobi van Tonder (South Africa)
Redha M (Algeria)
Aurélie Nyirabikali Lierman (Belgium/Rwanda)
Shadwa Ali (Egypt)
Tiago Correia-Paulo (Mozambique)
Jacqueline George (Egypt)
AMET (Cameroon/Germany)
Hibotep (Ethiopia/Somalia)
Aragorn23 (South Africa)
The Age Of Heroes (South Sudan)
Beko The Storyteller (eSwatini)
Catu Diosis (Uganda)
Yao Bobby & Simon Grab (Togo/Switzerland)
Mario Swagga and DJ Silila (Tanzania)
AFALFL (Mauritania)
Rey Sapienz (DR Congo)
Ibaaku (Senegal)
Sukitoa o Namau (Morocco)
Victor Gama (Angola)
Luca Forcucci featuring Cara Stacey and Mpho Molikeng (Italy/Switzerland/South Africa/Lesotho)
C-drík (Belgium/DR Congo)
Emeka Obgoh (Nigeria)
Chantelle Grey (South Africa)
Ski Crime (South Africa)

Similar releases :
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/uchronia
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/not-your-world-music-noise-in-south-east-asia
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/pekak-indonesian-noise-1995-2015-20-years-of-experimental-music-from-indonesia
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/art-of-the-muses
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/beyond-ignorance-and-borders
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/pangaea-noise
syrphe.bandcamp.com/album/302
onemoretapeblog.blogspot.com/2015/02/title-archives-humaines-vol.html

The post Alternate African Reality: reorient your listening with this terrific electronic compilation appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

BMI Settlement of Royalty Battle with RMLC to Include Music in Podcasts? – Not So Fast….

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 31 Jan 2020 6:14 pm

BMI and the Radio Music License Committee announced a settlement of their rate court litigation over the royalties that commercial radio will pay for the public performance of musical compositions licensed by BMI.  While we have not yet seen the agreement, the press release already raises one issue likely to sew confusion in the broadcast industry – the extent to which the agreement allows the use of music in podcasts.  While the press release says that the BMI license includes the use of music in podcasts, radio stations should not assume that means that they can start to play popular music in their podcasts without obtaining the rights to that music directly from rightsholders.  They cannot, as BMI controls only a portion of the rights necessary to use music in podcasts and, without obtaining the remaining rights to that music, a podcaster using the music with only a BMI license is looking for a copyright infringement claim.

So why doesn’t the license from BMI fully cover the use of music in a podcast?  As we have pointed out before, a broadcaster or other media company that has performance licenses from ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and even GMR does not get the right to podcast music – nor do the SoundExchange royalty payments cover podcasts. These organizations all collect for the public performance of music. While podcasts may require a performance license (see our article here about how Alexa and other smart speakers are making the need for such licenses more apparent as more and more podcast listening is occurring through streaming rather than downloads), they also require rights to the reproduction and distribution of the copyrighted songs and the right to make derivative works – all additional rights given to copyright owners under the Copyright Act. These additional rights are not covered by the public performance licenses from ASCAP, BMI, SESAC, GMR and SoundExchange, nor are the rights to use the “sound recording” or “master” in the podcast. What is the difference between these rights?

The public performance right is simply that – the right to perform a copyrighted work to the public (those beyond your circle of family and friends). Making a copy of a copyrighted work is a different right, as is the distribution of that recording. Both are triggered when the podcast is downloaded onto a phone or other digital device – the manner in which podcasts were initially made available to the public. As we have written before (see, for instance, here and here), by convention (and now by the provisions of the Music Modernization Act), making available music for on-demand streaming (where a listener can choose a particular song, or a set of songs that will play in the same order all the time) has come to be considered to involve the rights of reproduction and distribution even if a download does not occur (the “mechanical royalties” covered by the MMA – see our articles here and here on the MMA).  Thus, as podcasts – even when streamed – are made available on demand, the rights to the reproduction and distribution of the words and music of a song must be obtained.  These rights are obtained not from any of the organizations mentioned above, but usually for a production like a podcast, directly from the copyright holder – usually the publishing company with which the songwriter is affiliated (or the publishing companies in some cases where multiple songwriters have co-written a song and reserved rights to approve uses of the song in productions like podcasts – see our article here).

The right to make a derivative work is another right of the copyright holder (see my article here on derivative works). A copyright owner must give his or her permission before their work is modified in some way. While that can involve the changing of lyrics to a song, it can also involve associating that song in some permanent way with other content. In the video world, that is referred to as a synch right – where the audio is “synched” to the video creating a single audiovisual work. Synch rights are not specifically defined by the Copyright Act. They have traditionally referred to audiovisual productions, but the same concept is at play in the creation of a podcast, where the music is synched in a permanent fashion to other audio content to create the podcast. In a recent complaint by Universal Music against a podcaster, Universal complains that the podcaster violated not just the public performance rights of the copyright holders, but also their rights to authorize the reproduction, distribution, and the derivative works made from their copyrighted material (see our article here on that suit).

In addition, even if these rights are cleared, these rights only cover the underlying musical work or musical composition – the words and music in the song.  There are an entirely different set of rights necessary to use the recording of a song from a band or singer in a podcast.  The rights to the “sound recording” or “master recording” also need to be obtained for any on-demand use of music.  SoundExchange covers digital public performances of the sound recording, but only when provided in a noninteractive setting where the user cannot determine what song will be heard next (see our articles here, here and here for more on the difference between interactive and noninteractive digital uses).  The rights to use the master recording in a podcast, as the podcast is available on demand, need to come from the copyright holder of that master – usually the record label (but sometimes the artist) for most popular music.

This is all a long way of saying that podcasters need to get permission for the use of music in their productions. Many podcasters have commissioned original works where they license from local artists the recordings of music written and performed by those artists. Some online services have recently begun to develop, where they clear all the rights to music and license that music to podcasters for set fees. But, thus far, most of that music is not major label releases, but instead independent music.  There are some indications that might change in the near term. But right now, for major label releases, you generally need to get permission directly from the copyright holders to use their music in a podcast. The bottom line – don’t use music in podcasts without getting permission.

 

Elon Musk’s new EDM single reviewed – ‘Bringing erectile dysfunction to the masses!’

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Fri 31 Jan 2020 2:04 pm

The Tesla and SpaceX CEO has dropped Don’t Doubt Ur Vibe on Soundcloud – a wannabe dancefloor banger that somehow manages to doubt its own vibe

Like Charles Foster Kane splashing his millions on promoting his mistress’s disastrous opera career, very rich men have, in recent years, displayed a certain tendency to come to grief when dabbling in the field of music. First, the now-incarcerated pharma bro Martin Shkreli bought the only extant copy of the Wu-Tang Clan’s album Once Upon a Time in Shaolin and, as a result, was first called “a shithead”, “the Michael Jackson nose kid”, “the man with the 12-year-old body” and “a fake super-villain” by the group’s Ghostface Killah, and then became the subject of a Wu-Tang Clan diss track. Not, one suspects, the response he expected when he ponied up $2m for their CD. Now Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk – net worth $34.4bn – has launched a parallel career as an EDM artist, posting a track called Don’t Doubt Ur Vibe on Soundcloud.

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Squarepusher: Be Up a Hello review – devilish, danceable return

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Fri 31 Jan 2020 10:00 am

(Warp)
Tom Jenkinson goes back to his mid-90s moniker and makes use of old electronic hardware in a fun, if bumpy, ride

Emerging in the mid-90s as part of the generation of artists defining Warp Records’ IDM sound, Squarepusher now presides over a discography that positions himself directly opposite the genre’s ideological associations. His dense, frenetic electronica interprets sonic complexity as a million open invitations, rather than as barriers to entry. Pairing machine programming with dazzling live performance and eschewing loftiness in favour of embracing the straight-up silly, his is a sound that presses its abundance of influences into something that can only be processed through movement. Drum’n’bass, acid and Essex rave collide with jazz, organ music and television themes to create something both devilish and danceable. It’s a high-risk, high-reward gamble that’s present once again on new album Be Up a Hello and, as with many Squarepusher releases, you’ll know where things start but nothing about where they’ll end up.

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News | Nicolás Jaar Teams Up With FKA Twigs For New Track – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 31 Jan 2020 9:00 am
News | Nicolás Jaar Teams Up With FKA Twigs For New Track  The Quietus

THE LOVE SAVES THE DAY 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 30 Jan 2020 11:00 pm
Orbital and Kano headline! DJ EZ / Gorgon City, Little Simz, Fisher, Peggy Gou/DJ Harvey, Shy FX/M Huncho. Andy C also top the lineup.

Afrorack and Africa’s first DIY modular synth make some wild, delicious grooves

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 30 Jan 2020 8:20 pm

Bamanya Brian from Uganda wanted to explore modular synthesis – so he turned his electronics skills to making the instruments he needed himself. The gear is DIY; the resulting music is irresistible.

Meet Afrorack (artist name and a nice fitting moniker for his monster modular, too)!

Brian is actually here in Berlin right now, playing tonight at HAU2 (if you’re at CTM Festival), and participating in our Musicmakers Hacklab Sunday at Radialsystem. That has me … quite busy, so I’ll resort to some copy-paste here, but of course Brian, you’re welcome to go on at length whenever you like! The Afrorack modular itself is in our rehearsal studio and its electronic grooving tones are interweaving with jams and collaborations in our group. In his solo work, Afrorack is making unique, homebrewed techno, but also more complex polyrhythmic compositions and ambient drones, too.

Watch him give an overview, fresh from this month:

The modular phenomenon, nice as it is, has often been confined to deep pockets and particular geographies. So I’m sure this story will speak to anyone who feels isolated and/or on too tight a budget for some of the gear out there. He writes:

A few months ago I dipped my feet into the world of modular synths. The entire African continent has a handful of shops selling Euro rack modules which is really sad. Also, Euro rack modules are overly priced for someone in my context. My only option was to go the DIY route. I looked up schematics and started modifying some circuits and building others from scratch. All parts in my modular were sourced locally. In a few months I have learnt so much about electronics and analog synths and I have built what is an almost decent modular synth. I believe this is Africa’s first home made modular synth. I hope this video inspires someone out there to build their own synth. Feel free to ask any questions and please share and subscribe.

Arturia shot an interview with him, too:

So, there you get a lot of techno and acid sounds, but Afrorack is also exploring the musical language of his part of the world. Here’s a video featuring some self-described African rhythms, at a literal source – Lake Victoria, which borders Uganda and has its outflow into the Nile.

Now these asymmetrical grooves really speak my language, for sure…

The techno is also nicely weird and out there, in all the right ways:

Africa is continent-sized, of course, but the growth of Nyege Nyege Festival is helping put artists from not only Uganda but around the region on a global map. Crucially, this also lets festivals like ours in Berlin collapse geography and allow artists to meet in person and play together, and to allow unforgettable cross-pollination for artists, curators, and listeners.

Here’s Brian captured by Boiler Room (and the voice is the unmistakable Michail Stangl, who’s also not coincidentally one of the CTM Festival curators in Berlin):

By the way, if you’re curious about DIY yourself, here’s the resource Afrorack says he found most helpful:

And keep an eye out on Brian’s site, as it looks like more is coming:

The post Afrorack and Africa’s first DIY modular synth make some wild, delicious grooves appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE WIRELESS FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 30 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
A$AP Rocky, Skepta and Meek Mill headline! D-Block Europe, Quality Control: The Takeover, AJ Tracey, Lil Uzi Vert, and Lil Baby also top the lineup!

THE FIRST WAVE CREAMFIELDS 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 30 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
Martin Garrix, Nina Kraviz, Adam Beyer, deadmau5, Boris Brejcha, The Chainsmokers, Tiësto, Gareth Emery, Oliver Heldens and more top the list of new names!

Did You Know that There is a Rule that Broadcasters Have to Tell Their Audience that a Program Is Recorded When It Seems to Be Live? – FCC Sends a $50,000 Reminder

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 30 Jan 2020 2:45 pm

Did you know that the FCC has a rule that requires that a broadcaster notify its audience that a program has been pre-recorded when the program “creates the impression” that it is live?  Probably many broadcasters had forgotten about that rule (if they ever knew it existed).  This week the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau entered into a Consent Decree with Salem Media Group, in which Salem agreed to pay a $50,000 penalty and set up a monitoring and compliance plan for 3 years, after admitting that it violated this FCC rule.  The Enforcement Bureau specifically states that the action “will send a signal to the industry that the Commission remains vigilant in its duty to ensure that licensees adhere to the live broadcasting rule.” Consider yourself warned!

Section 73.1208 of the FCC’s rules requires broadcast stations to disclose to their audience that program material is prerecorded when “time is of special significance, or . . . [when] an affirmative attempt is made to create the impression that [the program material] is occurring simultaneously with the broadcast.”  The program that led to the Enforcement Bureau action was called HealthLine Live, airing on Saturdays on over 20 Salem stations.  The FCC, in its initial investigatory letter to Salem station KRLA(AM), the originating station (a letter available, as of the date of this article in the station’s public file), noted that because the word “Live” was in the title of the program, and because the program featured listener calls, the program gave the impression that it was being broadcast live.  Reviewing the transcripts of the program provided by the licensee, it certainly seemed to convey the impression that the program was a live discussion of health issues. 

The FCC began its investigation as a listener complained to the FCC that the program could not be live as the host had died before the program was broadcast.  The program apparently continued to run for several months between the date that the listener stated that they originally heard the program after the host’s death and the date that the listener filed the complaint with the FCC.

In response to the FCC’s investigatory letter, the licensee admitted that the program was in fact prerecorded, and that the host was indeed dead.  Because of the number of stations that broadcast the program, and the fact that only a handful of those stations mentioned to their listeners that the program was prerecorded, the FCC determined that a significant penalty was appropriate.

The rule requires that broadcasters notify their audience when a seemingly live program has in fact been prerecorded.  That notification must come at the beginning of the program and be clear and understandable to the audience.  On TV, the rule states that the notice can be given either visually or aurally.  Commercials, promos and PSAs are exempt from the requirement.

With the warning provided by this case, broadcasters need to make sure to review all of their programming to be sure that they are not airing programs, or segments of programs (including any network programs), that appear to be live but are in fact not live, without providing notice to their listeners or viewers.  Don’t re-run a talk show when the host is on vacation without mentioning that the program was recorded at an earlier date.  Don’t include pre-taped phone calls in a program without providing notice that the calls have been prerecorded.  If you include some live and some prerecorded calls in a program, disclose at the beginning of the program that portions of the program have been prerecorded.  With the explicit warning that the FCC has provided in this Consent Decree, broadcasters need to be vigilant to avoid problems that can result in a costly lesson.

News | Roskilde Adds 32 New Acts To 2020 Line-Up – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 30 Jan 2020 9:00 am
News | Roskilde Adds 32 New Acts To 2020 Line-Up  The Quietus

THE WIRELESS FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP IS OUT TOMORROW!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 29 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
The Wireless Festival 2020 lineup is out on Jan. 30th! There have been some false leaks but we'll get the TRUE lineup on Thursday.

THE CRSSD FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP BY DAY IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 29 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
Saturday has Chris Lake, Gesaffelstein, Nora En Pure, Patrick Topping and more. Sunday has Carl Cox AND Charlotte de Witte, Rüfüs Du Sol, 2manydjs and more. Get the details!

THE FIRST WAVE CREAMFIELDS 2020 LINEUP IS OUT TOMORROW!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 29 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
Eric Prydz, Carl Cox, Nina Kraviz, Calvin Harris, Bicep, Camelphat, Pendulum - Trinity and Armin van Buuren. The first wave lineup is out Jan. 30th.

THE FIRST NAME IN THE MUSIC MIDTOWN 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 29 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
It's a big name, the first headliner to be announced. Tickets have gone on sale.
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