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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 03


Don’t miss Barker’s percussive wonderland, live Against the Clock

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 11:03 pm

Get lost in a dreamscape of sound with Barker (Ostgut Ton) – who does what you do in a studio. With the clock ticking, he happily loses track of time.

It’s delightfully shiny, futuristic music – just what we need in a world that can feel dark and regressive. We spoke to Barker in the fall in the sunshine outside Berghain (playing against type). That conversation dwelled more on philosophy of music and rhythm than tech, but it’s just as stimulating to watch Sam at work on his machines.

Here he is for FACT‘s ongoing Against the Clock series – but I think embodying the best of what that format can be:

The action all takes place in Sam’s home flat, the same basic tools of his live shows. The heart of this rig, even with all those modulars around, is Elektron gear – the OctaTrack as sequencer and brain and sampler, the Digitone making those lovely chimey sounds, and the wonderful Faderfox for control. The Nord Drum adds extra noises, but maybe the most interesting aspect is the plate reverb with solenoids, sequenced by Arturia BeatStep Pro.

Against all this pristine digital goodness, the plate reverb produces some tightly-sequenced but organic and acoustic space. I believe that’s dadamachines as the friendly interface to the physical world – plug-and-play, MIDI-controllable robotics, also coming from Berlin.

For some of the deeper thinking behind Sam’s work lately, check our reflective interview from September:

I remember telling friends when I heard it that I thought Barker’s Utility on Ostgut Ton would be all over end-of-year lists. That was an easy bet – and it was right. But I’m still glad our resident music expert David Abravanel included Sam on the list we ran this week:

And it fits that headline description. It’s music from a techno artist, theoretically – resident of Berlin’s iconic Berghain, check, Ostgut Ton label, check, techno tools of the trade, yes, but added into a sum that just sits somewhere in music, without any particular genre affiliation.

And best of all, I think it’s the sort of sounds that make you want to go off and play, too.

The post Don’t miss Barker’s percussive wonderland, live Against the Clock appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Don’t miss Barker’s percussive wonderland, live Against the Clock

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 11:03 pm

Get lost in a dreamscape of sound with Barker (Ostgut Ton) – who does what you do in a studio. With the clock ticking, he happily loses track of time.

It’s delightfully shiny, futuristic music – just what we need in a world that can feel dark and regressive. We spoke to Barker in the fall in the sunshine outside Berghain (playing against type). That conversation dwelled more on philosophy of music and rhythm than tech, but it’s just as stimulating to watch Sam at work on his machines.

Here he is for FACT‘s ongoing Against the Clock series – but I think embodying the best of what that format can be:

The action all takes place in Sam’s home flat, the same basic tools of his live shows. The heart of this rig, even with all those modulars around, is Elektron gear – the OctaTrack as sequencer and brain and sampler, the Digitone making those lovely chimey sounds, and the wonderful Faderfox for control. The Nord Drum adds extra noises, but maybe the most interesting aspect is the plate reverb with solenoids, sequenced by Arturia BeatStep Pro.

Against all this pristine digital goodness, the plate reverb produces some tightly-sequenced but organic and acoustic space. I believe that’s dadamachines as the friendly interface to the physical world – plug-and-play, MIDI-controllable robotics, also coming from Berlin.

For some of the deeper thinking behind Sam’s work lately, check our reflective interview from September:

I remember telling friends when I heard it that I thought Barker’s Utility on Ostgut Ton would be all over end-of-year lists. That was an easy bet – and it was right. But I’m still glad our resident music expert David Abravanel included Sam on the list we ran this week:

And it fits that headline description. It’s music from a techno artist, theoretically – resident of Berlin’s iconic Berghain, check, Ostgut Ton label, check, techno tools of the trade, yes, but added into a sum that just sits somewhere in music, without any particular genre affiliation.

And best of all, I think it’s the sort of sounds that make you want to go off and play, too.

The post Don’t miss Barker’s percussive wonderland, live Against the Clock appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

CHORDimist is an insane Max for Live chord-generating MIDI effect

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 7:11 pm

Chordmaker, arpeggiator on steroids, harmonic processor – CHORDimist is another of the powerful Max for Live tools for composition.

I figured yesterday’s blitz of Max for Live news would bring out something I missed. Chris Hahn pointed us to this one, by South Korean-based developer Leestrument.

It’s a chord generator, but it’s also really an advanced arpeggiator / MIDI harmonizer, with modes for firing off, sustaining, or arpeggiating harmonies. Add in lots of parameters for direction and variation – both of the chords themselves and how they’re played – and you have a sophisticated MIDI effect.

CHORDimist is US$49 and requires the latest Max for Live, meaning you want Live Suite 10.1 or greater (or an equivalent Max for Live license).

https://gumroad.com/l/chordimist

Ha, also – I love that the filename for the screenshot on Lee’s site is _E1_84_89_E1_85_B3_E1_84_8F_E1_85_B3_E1_84_85_E1_85_B5_E1_86_AB_E1_84_89_E1_85_A3_E1_86_BA_202019-10-02_20_E1_84_8B_E1_85_A9_E1_84_8C_E1_85_A5_E1_86_AB_204.13.04.png.

That’s… specific.

The post CHORDimist is an insane Max for Live chord-generating MIDI effect appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

January 22 Deadline for Comments on FCC Proposal to Change Rule Prohibiting Duplication of Radio Programming

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 5:33 pm

The FCC recently proposed modifying its rules prohibiting a radio station in one service (either AM or FM) from duplicating more than 25% of the weekly programming of another station in the same service if there is more than 50% overlap of the principal community contour of either of the stations.  The FCC this week issued a Public Notice announcing that the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking setting out the proposed changes has now been published in the Federal Register, setting January 22 as the comment deadline in this proceeding, with replies due by February 6.

In the NPRM, the FCC notes that the broadcast industry has significantly changed since the rule was adopted, with over 19,000 commercial operating radio stations today, up almost 8000 from 1992 when the rule was adopted. In addition, there are noncommercial stations, LPFMs, and all sorts of digital audio services that did not exist in 1992.  In light of these industry changes, the Commission asks many questions on which they seek input from the public.  Are there public interest reasons to allow for more duplication, e.g. allowing economically challenged stations to combine rather than ceasing operations?  Will market forces prevent too much consolidation of programming by stations in the same market?  Will allowing more duplication affect diversity of broadcast ownership?  Is 50% overlap the appropriate standard, or are there reasons to use a different measure of overlap?  Should AM duplication be treated differently from FM duplication?  While not explicitly stated by the FCC, a relaxation of this rule could be particularly important for AM radio, as it could allow for a transition to digital by one AM station in a market (another proposal recently advanced by the FCC), while allowing another AM station in the same market to continue to air the same programming in an analog format for listeners who have not yet acquired digital AM receivers.  If a change in this rule could assist your operations, note the January 22 comment deadline.

Coachella 2020 announced with headliners Rage Against the Machine, Travis Scott and Frank Ocean

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 11:06 am

Lana Del Rey, Calvin Harris and 21 Savage to also appear at California event that kicks off festival season

Coachella, the most high-profile music festival in the US, has announced its full lineup for 2020.

Political rap-rock band Rage Against the Machine headline the Friday of the two-weekend festival in April (each weekend featuring the same lineup), as part of their first tour since 2011. The band, which formed in 1991, released four albums before splitting in 2000. They re-formed in 2007, with their first concert at Coachella that year. Two years later, following a fan campaign, they scored an unlikely UK Christmas No 1 with their expletive-filled track Killing in the Name.

Weekend 1 is sold out Register for Weekend 2 presale at https://t.co/x8PRTb12Eh. Presale starts Monday 1/6 at 12pm PT pic.twitter.com/QPRYnJVe9P

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THE COACHELLA 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 4:00 am
See who's in and how you can get tickets!

Ben Lee, Georgia Maq, Tame Impala: Australia’s best new music for January

Delivered... Nathan Jolly and Guardian Australia | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 2:01 am

Each month we add 20 of the best new Australian songs to our Spotify playlist. Read about 10 of our favourites below – and subscribe on Spotify, which updates with the full list at the start of each month

Related: Woodford folk festival review – a much-needed moment of positivity and reprieve

Related: How American pop star Halsey responded to the bushfire crisis faster than Australia’s prime minister

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