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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 09


INDIVIDUAL DAY BOTTLEROCK FESTIVAL TICKETS JUST WENT ON SALE

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
Weekend tickets are still available and individual day tickets just went on sale.

Keeley Forsyth: how the Happy Valley actor became the new Scott Walker

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 5:00 pm

She was enjoying a successful if gruelling film and TV career when serious illness struck. But Forsyth has channelled that experience into a bleakly beautiful avant-garde album

Yorkshire is the backdrop to many disquieting works of art, such as David Peace’s Red Riding Quartet, Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the Brontës’ explorations of the soul. The newest is Debris, an album made by a 40-year-old actor with a familiar, pale-eyed, haunting face, whom we have seen in recent years playing a sex worker in Sally Wainwright’s Happy Valley and heroin addicts in The Casual Vacancy and Waterloo Road.

Keeley Forsyth’s debut as a musician is an avant-garde proposition, however: a shivery descendent of Scott Walker’s Tilt, a more unsettling older sister of Aldous Harding’s Designer. Forsyth’s voice marries Peggy Lee’s bluesy vibrato with Nico’s thunderous terror, and delivers lyrics that invert nature, as a way of exploring despair. Large oaks descend and grow roots. Salt hills move. Madness unfurls.

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SUNSET MUSIC FESTIVAL 2020 TICKETS HAVE BEEN ANNOUNCED!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 5:00 pm
Get the deets on the dates and when tickets will go on sale. House Music, Dubstep, Trance and more in Tampa!

BONNAROO 2020 TICKETS JUST WENT ON SALE

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 5:00 pm
General Admission, GA+, VIP, Platinum tickets are now on sale! Tool, Lizzo, Tame Impala, Miley Cyrus, Flume, Lana Del Rey, Bassnectar, Oysterhead, Vampire Weekend and more!

DGTL festival makes its Asia debut in Bengaluru with a line-up of global artistes and a strong emphasis on – Indulgexpress

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 3:32 pm
DGTL festival makes its Asia debut in Bengaluru with a line-up of global artistes and a strong emphasis on  Indulgexpress

A Broadcaster’s 2020 Regulatory Calendar – Looking at Some of the Important Dates for the Year Ahead

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 3:23 pm

Here we are, more than a week into the New Year, and already we’ve written about a host of regulatory issues that will be facing broadcasters in the first month of the year (see for instance our articles here and here).  But what about the rest of the year?  As we do most years, we’ve put together a Broadcaster’s Regulatory Calendar for 2020, here.  While this calendar can’t be seen as an exhaustive list of every regulatory date that your station will face, it highlights many of the most important dates for broadcasters in the coming year – including dates for license renewal actions, EEO Public Inspection File Report preparation, Quarterly Issues Programs lists, children’s television obligations and much more.  It also provides the dates that the lowest unit charge windows open for most of the Presidential primaries and caucuses, as well as for the November general election.  Certainly, there will be plenty more dates to be aware of.  Follow our blog, read other newsletters and trade publications and consult your own attorney to stay on top of your regulatory obligations.  But, hopefully, our 2020 Broadcasters Regulatory Calendar will give you a good start on spotting some of the important dates that may affect your operations.

Georgia: Seeking Thrills review – a bold British hymn to hedonism | Alexis Petridis’ album of the week

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 1:00 pm

(Domino)
The singer and producer has absorbed Chicago house, Robyn-style pop and dub reggae, and refashioned them into an album about being ‘consumed by night’

The photo on the cover of Georgia Barnes’s second album seems telling. At first glance, it looks like one of those classic late 80s/early 90s club shots that get ageing acid house veterans moist-eyed with nostalgia. If you were hopelessly prone to romanticising, you might imagine that the people in it were dancing to a track made by Barnes’s father Neil, one-half of progressive house pioneers Leftfield. But it isn’t anything of the sort. On closer examination, it’s not a vintage photo of a rave but of a kids’ party; a 1988 image by photographer Nancy Honey, titled St Stephen’s School Disco, Bath.

Related: Georgia: the DIY producer zooming up the Radio 1 A-list

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Not just a “Foolish Foreigner”: How Baka Gaijin combines all the key ingredients to make a perfect club night

Delivered... andreasrichter | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 12:21 pm

Mark your calendars, especially if you’re reading this somewhere amid Germany’s Ruhr area. On Friday, January 10th, party promoter linchpin Baka Gaijin invites polyrhythmic composer Afrodeutsche to Salon des Amateurs for her Düsseldorf debut. Hit the event link here. “Baka what?!” you ask. Alexis Fallias, the man behind the project, explains that his Japanese best friend from childhood would...

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Now your smartphone can livestream with proper audio and more, using this new Roland gadget

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 5:26 am

The GO:LIVECAST promises to transform your smartphone from a craptacular lo-fi hassle into an all-in-one multitasking studio.

Webcasting, livestreaming, livecasting, broadcasting, recording, podcasting … let’s drop all the buzzwords and put this into one category. You know the drill: if you’re a one-person show, or you’re on the go, there’s a lot to juggle. And going mobile means doing exactly that – juggling.

The smartphone should be a great solution, until you realize it isn’t. Sound is the main issue, in that it’s a chore to get past the internal mic – even worse if you need to mix, say, voiceover and an instrument. And then the other tasks you have to solve tend to multiply from there.

The funny thing is, these problems now span a big group of people and use cases, blurring together “casual” and pro. Let’s not ever use the word prosumer again – this is really about mobility and autonomy. Smartphones have given us the promise of recording and broadcasting in all places. And people are doing it, regardless. The question now is, will we get tools so that the creation process isn’t frustrating and the results don’t look like crap.

Roland is one of the companies most aggressively vying to fill that use case, and crossing traditional audio production with new consumer uses. (See also: Zoom/Samson.)

GO:LIVECAST does aim to solve a lot of your problems, and it looks like it might pull it off.

Roland’s GO:MIXER is already a solid solution for mobile audio mixing, and if it’s just audio you’re dealing with in your smartphone recording, it might already be enough. But GO:LIVECAST also lets you easily integrate multiple audio feeds with your stream, and has an ambitious list of other functionality:

Add in audio inputs. No more relying on the internal mic on your phone. You get multiple ways of merging your phone’s high-quality imagery with (finally) higher-quality sound:

  • Built-in mic. (Roland claims this captures “high-quality” sound, so we’ll have to compare their hardware with popular phones to find out.)
  • External XLR input so you can use a proper microphone.
  • Stereo line input (for your synth or instrument or an external mixer, etc.)

Plus, there are actual knobs for adjusting levels, not to mention a reverb option for if you want to sing.

Monitor what you’re doing. GO:LIVECAST has the headphone jack that your phone now probably doesn’t, and the ability to monitor the other audio inputs, too.

Trigger titles and media. Radio has long had “soundboards” for triggering audio buttons or sound effects or IDs. This is that for not just sound, but also titles, photos, and videos, since you need this capability for AV generally. It appears the push-buttons on the device integrate with Roland’s app.

There’s some pre-built content (ewww) or you can make your own libraries (oooh).

Multi-camera support, with phones! You can use wifi to add a second camera, not only with the app, but even – didn’t expect this part – with the hardware.

Photo: Roland.

An app to solve all those problems logging in, starting, and monitoring. Anyone who’s tried to do a live stream knows this agony, especially as one person. There’s dealing with logins for streaming services. Then you have people commenting and want to respond. It’s a major pain bouncing between different interfaces.

Roland says they solve all of this with their app. The app logs you into popular services. (That’s YouTube, Facebook Live, and Twitch plus other “major” options – have to find out which.) And it lets you handle the camera and other features alongside checking comments in-app.

There’s in-camera mirroring so you can see yourself, and automatic switching between portrait and landscape modes (another major pain). There’s even a skin filter (took me a second to work out what they mean – I think as in the skin on your face, though some of these features are controversial elsewhere, so we need to see how they implement that.)

I/O: Runs on USB power, connects to Android and iOS devices, stereo minijack line in, XLR and 1/4″ TRS phone input with phantom power.

I’m a little concerned about those buttons and having them locked into Roland’s app. And it’s annoying that Roland is still on microUSB and not USB-C (though they have an adapter cable in the box). But the functionality looks useful, especially if paired with the existing GO:MIXER.

It all looks great – will it deliver? Roland definitely has the right idea. I’m keen to test this to see if it delivers on its promises.

And actually, far from being experienced pros, I think as musicians we’re even more desperately in need of help. Music making doesn’t necessarily prepare you for video production tasks. It makes you more demanding of sound quality, but you also have to deal with, you know, trying to play music and be inspired at the same time, leaving little bandwidth for streaming headaches.

Roland’s GO:MIXER was great, which gives me hope. And the basic features here really do look useful. Plus Roland in general – via their Edirol brand – have been on top of these kinds of production needs at the mid- and high-end, too.

I’m sure there are other streaming tools around CES this week, too. Stay tuned.

Check Roland’s product page, meanwhile:

https://www.roland.com/us/products/golivecast/

The post Now your smartphone can livestream with proper audio and more, using this new Roland gadget appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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