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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 13


HARD SUMMER 2020 TICKETS HAVE BEEN ANNOUNCED!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 13 Jan 2020 10:00 pm
The festival dates are Aug 1 - 2 at the Fontana Speedway. Tickets are this week, get the details!

HARD SUMMER 2020 TICKETS HAVE BEEN ANNOUNCED!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 13 Jan 2020 10:00 pm
The festival dates are Aug 1 - 2 at the Fontana Speedway. Tickets are this week, get the details!

Facebook Not Fact-Checking Candidate Ads – Looking at the Contrast Between Online Political Ads and Those Running on Broadcast and Cable

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 13 Jan 2020 6:02 pm

This weekend, the New York Times ran an article seemingly critical of Facebook for not rejecting ads  from political candidates that contained false statements of factWe have already written that this policy of Facebook matches the policy that Congress has imposed on broadcast stations and local cable franchisees who sell time to political candidates – they cannot refuse an ad from a candidate’s authorized campaign committee based on its content – even if it is false or even defamatory (see our posts here and here for more on the FCC’s “no censorship” rule that applies to broadcasting and local cable systems).  As this Times article again raises this issue, we thought that we should again provide a brief recap of the rules that apply to broadcast and local cable political ad sales, and contrast these rules to those that currently apply to online advertising.

As stated above, broadcast stations and local cable systems cannot censor candidate ads – meaning that they cannot reject these ads based on their content.  Commercial broadcast stations cannot even adopt a policy that says that they will not accept ads from federal candidates, as there is a right of “reasonable access” (see our article here, and as applied here to fringe candidates) that compels broadcast stations to sell reasonable amounts of time to federal candidates who request it.  Contrast this to, for instance, Twitter, which decided to ban all candidate advertising on its platform (see our article here).  There is no right of reasonable access to broadcast stations for state and local candidates, though once a station decides to sell advertising time in a particular race, all other rules, including the “no censorship” rule, apply to these ads (see our article here).  Local cable systems are not required to sell ads to any political candidates but, like broadcasters with respect to state and local candidates, once a local cable system sells advertising time to candidates in a particular race, all other FCC political rules apply.  National cable networks (in contrast to the local systems themselves) have never been brought under the FCC’s political advertising rules for access, censorship or any other requirements – although from time to time there have been questions as to whether those rules should apply.  So cable networks, at the present time, are more like online advertising, where the FCC rules do not apply.

Disclosure is another place where the government-imposed rules are different depending on the platform.  Broadcast and local cable systems have extensive disclosure obligations, in online public files, that detail advertising purchases by candidates and other issue advertisers.  We recently wrote (here and here) about the new enhanced disclosure rules for federal issue advertising (including ads supporting or attacking federal political candidates purchased by groups other than the candidate’s own campaign committee).  Cable networks and online platforms do not have federal disclosure obligations.  Some have voluntarily adopted their own disclosure policies.  In addition, some states have imposed obligations on these platforms (see, for instance, our article here), but as we wrote last month, at least one appellate court has determined, in connection with Maryland’s online political advertising disclosure obligations, that such rules are unconstitutional when imposed on platforms rather than on advertisers.

Certainly it can be argued that there are technical differences in the platforms that justify different regulation and different actions by the platforms themselves.  Online platforms clearly have the potential to target advertising messages to a much more granular audience.  The purpose of this article is not to argue one way or the other – just to point out that these differences exist.  As we are already well into the political season with advertising running for the 2020 election, we are unlikely to see significant changes in these rules for this election – but watch for more discussions on these differences in the future in terms of how various platforms treat political advertising, and whether this differing treatment should continue.

Behringer appears to have a TR-606 clone coming to NAMM

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 13 Jan 2020 5:47 pm

Behringer continues to look to vintage Roland gear to make new products. The teaser for the next product looks like a TR-606.

The 606 was a great cheap little box in its day, and has a cute form factor. But it was never the hit its 303 sibling was, and there are other compact drum machines now. That is, you’ve got not only the Roland Boutique Series, but also actual boutique items like MFB. And many drum machine lovers prefer larger form factors.

Cloning the 606 is old news:

If you didn’t like the sound of that, well – you probably just don’t like the sound of a 606, because that’s what it sounds like!

I always had a special affection for the 606, as did plenty of genuinely famous and relevant artists over the years (not just weirdos like myself). But the actual sound is pretty easy to replicate with samples, so this one is a puzzler.

And that may answer the question of why Roland didn’t do a TR-…. uh TR-06? … with the other Boutiques. The TR-08 and TR-09 are already essentially 606-sized, but with the 909 and 808 sounds and controls that more people are after. And you can more or less get some 606 sounds loading samples into a TR-8S or any other drum machine with sample import. (Heck, a volca sample will do the trick.)

I’m sure there are 606 fans who will be looking for this. You are presumably the ones Behringer “hears.” We’ll have to wait and see how Behringer executed their take on a bare-bones early 80s design.

The bigger question for Behringer at NAMM may be to find out where their TR-909 “tribute” is, as I think that’s the item more people will covet.

(Original) TR-606 image at top (CC-BY-SA) Midas Wouters.

The post Behringer appears to have a TR-606 clone coming to NAMM appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE BUNBURY MUSIC FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP ANNOUNCEMENT IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 13 Jan 2020 4:00 pm
Find out when the lineup will be announced and ... Hive Hints have begun.

THE BUNBURY MUSIC FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP ANNOUNCEMENT IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 13 Jan 2020 4:00 pm
Find out when the lineup will be announced and ... Hive Hints have begun.
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