Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 14


THE PHASE 4 NOISE POP 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 10:45 pm
Washed Out doing a DJ set, Califone, Jenny Lee + TT of Warpaint, Bas and The Greyboy Allstars were all announced today. See the full lineup and get a rundown of the event!

THE INITIAL LIGHTNING IN A BOTTLE 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 10:45 pm
Kaytranada, Sylvan Esso, GRiZ, Purity Ring, Four Tet, Big Wild, Jon Hopkins, James Blake DJ set, Amon Tobin presents Two Fingers, DJ Shadow, Nina KraviZ .. *MIND BLOWN* + there's more!

Arturia KeyStep Pro is the sequencer keyboard we were waiting for

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 8:35 pm

It’s like a BeatStep Pro, but with keys, but with KeyStep features, but with extras. And it’s still compact. Sounds like Arturia may have a hit on their hands.

Remember when we were all repeatedly saying that the KeyStep was cool, but it’d be nice if there were a KeyStep Pro? To their credit, Arturia did keep cramming functionality into their compact keyboard, and that means the latest firmware turned it into a little powerhouse – and one you still might want to consider:

But now the KeyStep Pro expands that. If you loved the BeatStep Pro but wish it had keys instead of pads, or if you loved the KeyStep but wish it had extra encoders and polyphonic features, well… mark your calendars for March the 20th. That’s the date this model launches.

Yep, it sequences all this stuff – MIDI (via minijack or minijack to DIN adapter), USB, analog, with computer or standalone.

And this is still a beat sequencer, so just because it’s a tricked out sequencer keyboard doesn’t mean you need to start making only tripped-out prog rock.

Basically, it’s an ideal performance hub for anyone who likes keyboards. You get loads of compositional flexibility:

  • 4 independent sequencers, which you can route to whatever synths or drum machines or modular or gear you want – just as on the BeatStep Pro
  • 4 tracks have 16 patterns each, and chain 16 patterns into a song
  • Scenes snapshot all the sequences within a pattern, for swapping between sets of patterns
  • Projects let you load up different scenes

And then there’s a nicely balanced complement of physical control.

  • 37 keys with velocity and channel aftertouch
  • LEDs above the keys give you added visual feedback for sequencing
  • Touch strips give you pitch + mod or other assignable controls
  • There’s an internal metronome, which you can listen to (to sync humans) or output as audio (to sync analog hardware)
  • Finally, five encoders with LED ring feedback – that’s an improvement on the BeatStep Pro, at least if you want to swap scenes without having to fiddle with the knobs to get them to pick up the right value
  • And of course step editing buttons, or this wouldn’t be an Arturia ‘step

It’s less portable than the original, but it’s still reasonable – 5.9 lbs or 2.7 kg, and slightly larger. They’re still slim keys, but that also makes this easier to drop into a backpack.

There’s also a crisp new OLED display – nice.

Price is US$449 / EUR 399 list, so it isn’t cheap – the BeatStep Pro is then a nice bargain buy if you like pads as well as you do keys. But for those of us who wanted exactly this as a hub, it looks like a good investment, rather than building a collection of keyboards that kinda sorta do what we want but not really.

More details and full specs:

https://www.arturia.com/products/hybrid-synths/keystep-pro/overview

And the video. Now is a good time to announce CDM’s exciting pivot to video features. Stand on one toe… good… oh, okay, stop groaning at me.

(Heh, I just noticed that Arturia’s own mailing list says this was the sequencer that we’ve “been waiting for.” Well, their product people knew that I was waiting and CDM readers were waiting, as I’d talked to them about it! Review coming soon, hopefully!)

The post Arturia KeyStep Pro is the sequencer keyboard we were waiting for appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE PHASE 3 SXSW MUSIC 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
Beach Slang, Lydia Lunch, Night Moves, Soul Asylum, Soccer Mommy and The Posies top the list of new names. See who's performing!

Novation’s Launchpad Pro is grid and sequencer, for software or standalone for gear

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 5:54 pm

Novation’s grids continue getting more flexible and more open – that last bit setting them apart from products designed to be unitasker controllers for a single piece of software.

The updated Launchpad Pro is full of stuff Launchpad fans asked for, and rounds on the current Launchpad range with an advanced model. I love the mini for its size and simplicity – it’s earned a regular place in my bag as a result. But while still being relatively compact and affordable, the Pro now more than ever is the do-everything grid.

And since it isn’t tethered to the computer, it’s also useful when your laptop is switched off, or as part of an all-hardware live rig.

Plus the Launchpad Pro has velocity and pressure sensing – that’s improved in this revision.

New in this version:

Built-in sequencer (previously this was available when you hacked the firmware and wrote it yourself, which was a fun novelty but … not very user friendly!)

Transport controls

Deeper Ableton Live integration: tap tempo, print to clip, capture MIDI – all features Ableton has introduced on Push, but which also works really well with Novation’s more compact, lightweight, and simpler controller.

Eight custom modes

Components editor

Chord mode

USB-C adapter (this turns out to be a lot more convenient, as this becomes the standard – and I’ve had no problem with breakage or disconnection, since I know some of you worry about that. Unless you’re really buying crap cables, USB-C is the best USB we’ve gotten so far.)

MIDI in, out, and 2x thru (!) (expanding a bit on what was there before)

Plus – here’s the nicest trick. The pads are bigger and more responsive, but the unit itself is more compact and lightweight.

Honestly, I find I routinely pull out the mini and this new Pro for work in Live (and other tools). Novation sent me a Pro prototype, and it already feels terrific. It’s also clear they’ve taken some of the best design cues from Ableton and Native Instruments. It’s nice to see attractive, futuristic-looking gear – and basically at the same prices as before.

There’s a lot more to say about Launchpad Pro and Novation’s new approach to opening up their grids to developers. I have now all the models and am in touch with the developers. I’m personally interested in being able to seamlessly switch between tools like Ableton Live, VCV Rack, Bitwig Studio, and custom-coded/custom-patched stuff – and between computers and hardware. So thanks to the fact that there is a one-to-one correspondence between what I’d want to spend my time on musically and what might be useful to share, seems this could be the start of a beautiful grid-ship.

https://novationmusic.com/en/launch/launchpad-pro

The post Novation’s Launchpad Pro is grid and sequencer, for software or standalone for gear appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

KORG have new hybrid/analog mixers, made with Greg Mackie and Peter Watts

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 4:27 pm

Surprise – the best product news from KORG this year might not be a synth. Their new mixer looks like the one we’ve been waiting for.

Let’s face it – it hasn’t been a great time for mixers. The mixing class divide has only grown. So there are some excellent high-end analog boutique and live-oriented digital mixers that you can’t afford. And then at the entry level, there’s been the race to the bottom that sees armies of clones and dropping quality without much innovation. Those you can afford, which is a good thing, but there’s not much to be passionate about.

KORG have gone back to the mixer design team that made a lot of stuff that producers and live performers really love as much as mix engineers. That means bringing in Greg Mackie and Peter Watts.

I don’t want to get too excited too fast – especially not knowing the street price. But at least on paper, this looks like promising stuff.

The KORG SoundLink comes in very reasonable looking 24- and 16-channel models. They’ve got nice, compact form factors that are nonetheless packed with features. And then they have DSP and KORG effects.

So you get the MW2408 (24-channel) and MW160 (16-bit) – analog mixers with digital control and DSP from KORG.

Looking at the layout, features, and the people behind it, I’m very, very interested. Some highlights:

HiVolt mic preamps – and keeping in mind Peter Watts worked on the Trident preamps that everyone is trying to copy

Mute groups – even on a compact mixer. (YES.)

Independent musician phone outputs, with dedicated knobs so your musicians can hear what they’re doing and control their own outputs. (YES, again.)

Built-in KORG effects and easy-access DSP. All your dynamics and reverb and EQ and spectrum analyzers and essentially what you’d expect on your computer DAW are now also in your mixer. The surprise is, it looks like there’s not too much menu diving – thanks to dedicated buttons to assign these. There’s even a test tone generator.

And yes, it’s Greg Mackie – that Mackie – who perhaps more than anyone has bridged the gap between what musicians and mixing engineers want and the mixer design and engineering that delivers. That sounds like marketing copy, but once you get past the influential early studio consoles, and very practical mixers for studios, most of the design of mixers used by musicians and producers has some ideas borrowed from Greg.

Peter Watts is an equally legendary engineer, and seeing the two of them with KORG’s own input – I think that’s a big deal.

If the price is within reach, I think it’ll be a hit. I mean, if it’s in reach, this is the one I would be looking to buy.

I have loads of questions, as I didn’t get complete specs on this, so I’m inferring a lot from the images (click through for bigger ones). Stay tuned for some answers.

The post KORG have new hybrid/analog mixers, made with Greg Mackie and Peter Watts appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Return of full-sized KORG MS-20, as retro trend continues

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 3:56 pm

It’s badly upstaged by the ARP 2600, but for those who want it, KORG are again making full-sized MS-20 synths. That caps a long string of MS-20s from KORG.

The KORG MS-20 was one of the products that helped launch the current wave of big-name remakes. And KORG has done versions of the MS-20 every way imaginable. Let’s review just a few:

Nintendo DS game – KORG DS-10 (loosely based on the original)

iPad app – iMS-20 (plus KORG Gadget, too, if you want to be completionist)

MS-20 Legacy Collection plug-in, which briefly had available an external controller for the computer that supported patching:

A mini version – the MS-20 mini (hey, Japan does seem to appreciate things being small and – I’m totally with them on this, so like Japan and me)

The best of all of these, perhaps, is the full-sized MS-20 kit. I made one; and it’s brilliant – because of its reliability and flexibility, maybe even a little better than having the original around.

But the MS-20 kit was a limited edition. And so now we have the MS-20FS (for Full-Sized). It appears to be identical to the kit in every way – USB and MIDI, switchable filter, and even the original 1978 manual included in the box. But apart from the switchable filter and new I/O, it’s indistinguishable from the original – enough so that once it’s got some dust on it, these are regularly mistaken for the original.

The only news in the reissue is colors – four powder-coat options, in an attractive green, white, blue, and black.

No word yet on pricing, but this is coming this year.

White looks fresh. Note to self – idea for new stage persona, Colonel Sanders suit — new note to self, delete previous note.
Built like a tank, looks like a …
In blue, it’s obvious, but in black, these ports on the back are the only way to easily tell the FS isn’t an original MS-20.

That’s all fine and well, but am I alone in wishing for a new semi-modular, patchable thing from KORG? The MS-20 is great, but the more we live with it, the more I wonder what a new instrument catering to modern tastes might be.

Then again, I celebrated my birthday yesterday and I was also introduced in 1978 so — never mind. Things from 1978 are for more relevant than anything younger and cooler and all of you should really just throw money at us. Good, there, done. Oh wait – I should work on some color options for myself.

For more MS action – here’s a minisite dedicated to the MS-10 synth:

And sorry, 1978, but this NAMM is all about 1970, because of this:

The post Return of full-sized KORG MS-20, as retro trend continues appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

TunePlus Wordpress Theme