Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 16


THE GOVERNORS BALL 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 16 Jan 2020 7:00 pm
Tame Impala, Missy Elliot, Flume, Vampire Weekend, Stevie Nicks, Solange, Miley Cyrus, Ellie Goulding, Rüfüs Du Sol, H.E.R., Portugal. The Man, Foals and more. Tickets this week, get the details!

Behringer’s first 11 Eurorack modules are here – and they’re even called System 100

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 16 Jan 2020 6:44 pm

Behringer promised to recreate the Roland System 100 modular system, and they’ve done that – with a system they call the System 100.

There’s no pricing or other details yet; everything is in a system.

There’s not a lot to say, because spec-for-spec, this is the same as a 1975 System 100. It’s just been scaled down to make sense as Eurorack and (presumably) to keep the price down.

Roland oscillators are … well, pretty vanilla now given other options. But there are useful utility modules, a particularly interesting phase shifter, and all the other features that made the Roland system popular in the first place.

On some level, it’s a shame no one is copying the charming look of the original System 100 – or its distinctive keyboard hub. Even Roland aren’t attempting that. But of course that would mean a higher price tag, and it might not fit as readily into a Eurorack system.

But these should be expected to be solid sellers, even before knowing the price – because Behringer have done a complete set, and it looks like fit and finish and so on are dead-on. Also, Behringer have a leg up that even Roland didn’t have with their own modular additions – I suspect a lot of people will do exactly what you see in the video, and couple Behringer’s rack-mountable, patchable desktop synths with these modular add-ons. The Neutron and its ilk made an obvious entry level for selling people up to more modules.

Say what you will about Behringer, but if other makers didn’t offer that option, that’s on them.

Of course, what you don’t get here is new ideas – so as with all the remakes debuting in 2020, the best advice to any independent maker remains, make something that isn’t from the 1970s … for example. I’m not sure even the 1970s had as many announcements from the 1970s as this week.

Again, still no pricing or availability, but here at least are those stills so you don’t have to pause through (why, Behringer, did you do that, exactly?)

The post Behringer’s first 11 Eurorack modules are here – and they’re even called System 100 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Moog’s Subsequent 25 synth is here, and it’s got an animated film to go with it

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 16 Jan 2020 6:03 pm

For all Moog’s synths, it’s been a while since there was a sweet spot that said – oh, if I want a Moog, I should start here. The Subsequent 25 could be that instrument.

Okay, “subsequent” feels a little too much like an SAT word, compared to the endearing “Little Phatty” and “Sub Phatty.” But you could call this thing practically anything – it’s a cute little Moog, and about as Moog-y looking as anything since the 1970 Minimoog.

It’s just … adorable. I mean, someone should say that, because I fully expect this Moog will trigger some serious consumer instincts.

And appreciating that synths for a lot of musicians are about feelings and fantasy, Moog are repeating their collaboration with Flying Lotus to make an animated short film. (Scoff all you like – if you had a marketing budget, wouldn’t you want to spend it like this?) The inimitable Brainfeeder maestro FlyLo teams up with designer-musician Julian House. You might have heard House’s own music as The Focus Group and Ghost Box label, but you almost certainly know his album covers for the likes of Oasis and The Prodigy.

Anyway, this is all good fun. Here:

Okay, but you probably do want specs, too. In the year of polysynths, this isn’t that – it’s a massive bass synth that also happens to have a new Duo Mode to split osc 1 + osc 2.

So you have three oscillators – including one sub oscillator – and additionally a noise source

Four CV inputs, which is a decent-sized complement for a mid-range analog synth.

Multidrive, which combines two types of distortion to color the sound (and really makes all of this dirty and interesting).

It’s a Moog, so yes, there’s a Ladder Filter, but with 6, 12, 18, and 24 dB/octave slopes.

Audio input as well as (mono) output

USB and MIDI and full MIDI implementation – that’s actually a bigger deal than it seems, as there’s MIDI control of everything, including things like gate reset. Paired with the right sequencer, this could be a total beast.

Flexible LFO, with tri, square, saw, ramp, S&H shapes

It’s heavy – 16 lbs – over 7 kg. But you probably like that if you want a Moog.

Proper pitch and mod wheels

Now that the rational part of your brain is engaged, it’s also worth saying that you might want to save up for the powerful Subsequent 37, the Sub 25’s bigger sibling. It’s a significant price difference (though there is the used market). But in addition to more keys, the big draw of the Sub 37 is – more hands-on controls, more envelopes and modulation, and a built-in arp/step sequencer.

Sounds:

(Writing synth press releases is hard. Duophonic synths require you to sound like you’re an over-excited Leonin or Perotin attending NAMM – “opening new doors of musicality by playing two different notes at once.” Wait ’til the monks and sisters catch THIS bad boy!)

Certainly looks Moog-y. It’s almost a Mini-Minimoog… with Sub. That seems a good thing. Note the options on the filter, and the Multidrive distortion circuit, plus the easy-access, Minimoog-style mixing section.

There’s also editor/librarian software included free, so the notion is you can extend the 16 x 16 (256) onboard patches with more stuff on the computer. And that’s what makes this somewhat unique: it is an analog synth, but it’s one that you might go deep into editing or sequencing. It’s obviously a performance-oriented, jam- and improv-focused keyboard axe, but it’s got enough CV that you could still devise some detailed patches with modular or semi-modular gear.

The free editor/librarian is meant to be part of the workflow here.
And yes, Moog as usual include tons of build photos from their North Carolina factory in the press. This is really what it looks like, though, I’ve been there (as have some readers, I’m sure).

Moog have staked out this territory as the premium synth makers, and that’s what this looks like. It’s a pretty middle-of-the-road synth, but with tons of detail – and that Multidrive thing makes sure it isn’t too tame.

And for all the creativity of the Moog line lately, I fully expect the Subsequent 25 will get people past the hump of trying to decide what to buy. I’d say shame about the name, but I bet a lot of people just call it Moog.

US$895 list.

For more Moog film watching, check this behind-the-scenes with Uncut Gems composer Daniel Lopatin:

As an addendum, and part of why I think this appeals to the frontal lobes (even as the design triggers some irrational emotional appeal), here’s the amount of stuff you can control with MIDI – including high-resolution output. Even if you don’t use this via MIDI, it’s an interesting window into the architecture:

  • Mono/Duo Mode  
  • Duo Osc 2 Priority  
  • Filter Velocity Sensitivity 
  • Volume Velocity Sensitivity 
  • Ext. Audio Level 
  • Osc 2 Beat Frequency 
  • VCO Gate Reset 
  • LFO Gate Reset 
  • Pitch Bend Up Amount 
  • Pitch Bend Down Amount 
  • Glide Legato 
  • Glide Type 
  • Filter Poles 
  • Wave Mod. Destination 
  • LFO KB Tracking 
  • LFO Range 
  • Filter EG Reset 
  • Amp EG Reset 
  • Legato 
  • Gate On/Ext. 
  • MIDI Ch. In 
  • MIDI Ch. Out 
  • Local Control 
  • 14-Bit MIDI Output 
  • MIDI Path In 
  • MIDI Path Out 
  • MIDI Merge DIN 
  • MIDI Merge USB 

Specs:

  • Sound Engine Type(s): Analog (2 x Oscillators, 1 x Sub Oscillator, 1 x Noise Generator) 
  • Number of Keys: 25 
  • Type of Keys: Semi-weighted, Velocity-Sensitive 
  • Other Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel 
  • Polyphony: Monophonic, 2-Note Paraphonic 
  • LFO: Triangle, Square, Sawtooth, Ramp, Sample & Hold 
  • Filter: Moog Ladder Filter with 6/12/18/24 dB per Octave Slopes 
  • Number of Presets: 16 (4 Banks of 4) 
  • Effects Types: Multidrive 
  • Audio Inputs: 1 x 1/4″ (ext in) 
  • Audio Outputs: 1 x 1/4″ 
  • USB: 1 x Type B 
  • MIDI I/O: In/Out/USB 
  • Other I/O: Filter CV in, Pitch CV in, Volume CV in, KB Gate in 
  • Software: Plug-in and standalone editor and librarian for Mac/PC 
  • Power Supply: 110V AC-240V AC (Internal) 
  • Height: 6.75″ 
  • Width: 20.25″ 
  • Depth: 14.75″ 
  • Weight: 16 lbs. 

The post Moog’s Subsequent 25 synth is here, and it’s got an animated film to go with it appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE SHAKY KNEES 2020 LINEUP BY DAY IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 16 Jan 2020 5:00 pm
The Black Keys headline Friday, The Smashing Pumpkins on Saturday and The Strokes on Sunday. It's in Atlanta features a lineup of indie rock, indie pop and alternative music for three days of glorious music!

FCC Consent Decree Requires $1,130,000 Payment to Settle Issues About Monitoring Tower Lights – Are You Doing What’s Required?

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 16 Jan 2020 4:52 pm

Earlier this week, the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau released an Order approving a consent decree with Scripps Broadcasting where Scripps agreed to pay a penalty of $1,130,000 for perceived violations of the FCC’s rules requiring tower light monitoring for towers used by a number of TV stations that it had recently purchased.  The company also agreed to adopt numerous procedures to insure continuing compliance, including notification to the FCC of future issues.  The FCC began the investigation when a plane crashed into one station’s tower.  While the FCC specifically states that it did not find any evidence that any of the “irregularities” in the tower monitoring process contributed to the plane crash, the crash opened the door to the FCC’s investigation of the company’s tower light monitoring process at all of its stations, leading to this fine.  Are you ready for such an investigation?

In the consent decree, the Commission cites various tower-related FCC rules that must be observed by tower owners.  The rules include Section 17.47(a), which requires antenna structure owners to monitor the status of a structure’s lighting system by either (1) making “an observation of the antenna structure’s lights at least once each 24 hours either visually or by observing an automatic properly maintained indicator designed to register any failure of such lights” or (2) by “provid[ing] and properly maintain[ing] an automatic alarm system designed to detect any failure of such lights and to provide indication of such failure to the owner.”  That rule also requires that the tower owner inspect any automatic monitoring system at least once every 3 months to make sure that it is working correctly, unless the owner is using a system certified as reliable and not requiring such inspection by the Wireless Bureau of the FCC. 

The rules also require that the tower owner keep records of the required monitoring, including any instances where any required lighting is not operating (noting when the outage occurred and when it was repaired, and when FAA notice was provided).  The FCC rules also require prompt notification to the FAA when certain lights have stopped operating – obviously so that the FAA can notify aircraft operating in the vicinity of the tower.

Part 17 of the rules also sets out painting requirements for towers, and requirements that many towers be registered with the FCC.  In fact, in the Scripps case, part of the fine was based on Scripps’ failure to notify the FCC of the ownership change of some of the towers as required by the FCC tower registration rules (see our posts here and here about other fines for this violation).

One article like this cannot possibly set out all the tower lighting, painting, and monitoring rules.  But the severity of the sanctions in this case demonstrates the obvious importance of these rules – and the need for each broadcaster to carefully review these rules and make sure that they are strictly complying with all of the requirements.  Because of the safety risks, the FCC takes tower maintenance requirements very seriously (see our post here where we wrote about a notification from the FCC to tower owners that paying penalties was “not just a cost of doing business” but much more serious).  Even companies that are merely leasing tower space have responsibilities to notify the FCC and FAA if their lessor is not performing its responsibilities to maintain the tower (see our post here).  The risk of non-compliance is not only penalties like the one assessed in this case, but also potential civil liability in cases where there are incidents like the situation that started the investigation.  Take your responsibilities seriously.

Resolutions 2020: Advance Your Artistry With These Music Resources

Delivered... Caroline Whiteley | Scene | Thu 16 Jan 2020 1:41 pm

Looks like the new 2020 you has finally committed to leaving behind the socially encoded path to become an artist. A creative career is a nebulous quest that, unfortunately, comes with no roadmap. But rest assured that countless like-minded people have been in similar vulnerable positions and have started their new life phases from scratch. Expanding your network and mastering the mechanisms of...

Source

TunePlus Wordpress Theme