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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 17


Pioneer’s new 6-channel DJ mixer could be a producer and live act favorite

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 17 Jan 2020 8:32 pm

Its expanded mixing and EQ section have already inspired memes, but live acts will sure be happy to see it in the booth.

Pioneer, of course, faces an ongoing problem. Having taken over the world, there’s not much left to conquer. At the entry level, the strategy isn’t hard – there’s an expanding market of first-time DJs, and the company’s combination of Rekordbox-for-computers with Rekordox-for-USB-stick-prep seems a winner. But at the high end, the product stury is murkier. What do people want? Samplers? Synths? Decks that work like samplers? Giant touchscreens?

The DJM-V10 makes more sense – and it helps build a platform in the booth for plugging in those other Pioneer toys.

More quality: Thanks to the onboard sound engine and ESS9016 chip, they deliver 64-bit mixing and 32-bit A/D and D/A, respectively. Oddly, they say this gives it more “warmth,” which is not what warmth means, but it should provide more transparent mixing.

New EQ, new compressor: You now get a new 4-band EQ – an extra shot across the bow of Allen & Heath – and a built-in compressor. I have no earthly idea why anyone would run today’s over-compressed tracks through another layer of compression (gah!), but that should come in very handy with live inputs, where you really do miss it.

Expanded FX: They’ve grown the send/return section so you can use your own external effects – which I also suspect means we’ll see new effects boxes from Pioneer soon.

3-band master isolator: The good thing about this – it’s got dedicated controls for high, mid, and low, rather than making you flick a switch like on most DJ mixers.

More I/O: 6-channel digital mixer design, which doubles as a USB sound card. They advertise a range of inputs, but it’s still unbalanced phono plugs – 6 line + 4 phono.

What they have done is add digital ins, so in addition to the USB interface acting as multichannel audio interface to your computer, there are also 6 digital coax ins.

2 USB B ports, 1 USB a port. Seems it’s odd to release in 2020 without USB-C, but that’s what they’ve done.

Oh, yeah, and they win me over with this alone – the inputs are aligned with the channel strips. Finally, no more hunting around the back of the mixer to find the right input.

MIDI out: Maybe this is really the lede. Pioneer continues pushing Pro DJ Link for sync, but each gadget they ship with MIDI DIN out proves the company might be open to connecting non-Pioneer gear. (It’s not the first Pioneer mixer to do this – and there’s still not a deck with MIDI out – but it’s something.)

DJ-friendly monitoring: Dual headphone outs mean you finally don’t have to fight the DJ/performer before or after you for the headphone jack as you switch over. And booth EQ helps prevent destroying your ears on the booth monitors – finally.

There are a lot of other nice touches – built-in iPhone/iPad mix recording (via DJM-REC), a lockable power cable, DVS integration with Rekordbox and TRAKTOR and Serato, and even visual ShowKontrol integration for AV and lighting.

Plus, it’s a DJM, so you can count on a lot of onboard effects – and then it’s up to you to use them tastefully. At least they’re more tasteful, as I see dedicated buttons for “short” and “long” delays, dub echo, and reverb – like the stuff you actually would want to use.

I would stand by the DJM line. I think they’re more usable and friendly than the competition, and I think having built-in effects is a good thing – it’s a show with an audience, not a studio.

The rest of this we have to actually test, in that Pioneer says a lot about how they’ve adjusted fader feel and EQ.

So sure, this is funny —

Not really the DJM-V10. But you know Richie Hawtin is dreaming of this right now.

— but no mind. I’d sure like to have this mixer in the booth. And I could imagine it doing double duty in some home studios, too, depending on price – at least for people who have DJ rigs at home that double for production.

Do most DJs need it? Probably not. Will it make plugging in for the rest of easier? Absolutely so.

Now we just need to know the price (gulp). But hey, the club will buy theirs.

https://www.pioneerdj.com/en/landing/djm-v10-6-channel-professional-dj-mixer/

The post Pioneer’s new 6-channel DJ mixer could be a producer and live act favorite appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

KORG has a sneak peak of a new DX7-like FM synth – the opsix

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 17 Jan 2020 7:39 pm

Imagine a DX7, but with more parameter controls via extra faders – and it’s a KORG. That’s the best we can tell about the new opsix.

MATRIXSYNTH got the scoop on this one before the American NAMM trade even began this week:

New KORG DX7 – the opsix

I’m not sure if calling it a “new DX7” is quite fair, as we just don’t know about it enough. But certainly KORG have copped the look and feel of the original – curious how Yamaha will react there – and added additional controls. Whether there are other KORG touches, it’s hard to say, though you’re welcome to squint at this image:

It’s not unheard of for manufacturers to show up with synthesizers hidden under glass. (I hear if a certain Prince Charming comes along and gets into the glass coffin and kisses the prototype, the enchantment will be lifted and it will magically wake up with complete firmware. But maybe that only works in Disney movies.)

FM synthesis remains a tough nut to crack from a usability standpoint, so I’m not sure about this one. It at least adds to the pile of retro-themed synths this year.

It seems likely that this came from the Japanese engineering team at KORG, given their past with FM on the volca series – and it seems equally likely that they were busy on other products, too. But KORG are proving themselves to be still prolific and provocative.

Watch this space.

The post KORG has a sneak peak of a new DX7-like FM synth – the opsix appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

If you’ve got $7500, you can also have an E-mu SP-1200 sampler remake

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 17 Jan 2020 7:12 pm

Also new in 2020 – a remake of the legendary 1987 E-mu SP-1200. Just get ready for some sticker shock, because it’s not just a clone, it’s an actual SP-1200, rebuilt.

This one is an extremely, extremely limited edition because it starts with an original working SP-1200. So the price tag is similar to a top-condition refurbished 1200 because that is literally what it is. The new SP-1200 undertaking comes from E-mu Systems co-founder Dave Rossum, so we can think of this as passion project more than anything.

Rossum Electro-Music calls it “better-than-new.”

Starting with an original SP-1200 and upgrading and calibrating it, you get (copy-pasting here):

  • A new 3.5″ disk drive (seriously), plus an SD card floppy emulator integrated with the software (by Dave himself, no less).
  • Manual filter cutoff frequency control sliders for the SSM 2044 analog filters for channels 1 and 2 added to the rear panel
  • A new metal chassis
  • A new panel overlay
  • The top shell restored and painted “SP Grey.”
  • A new power supply with locking connector (and cool operation)
  • A new LCD display with adjustable brightness and a selectable red, blue, or green color LED backlight
  • All new play buttons
  • All new programming buttons
  • All new 1/4” and MIDI jacks
  • All electrolytic and tantalum capacitors replaced with high-reliability ceramic or aluminum-poly caps
  • All rotary potentiometers replaced with million cycle lifetime pots and installed with new knurled black metal knobs
  • All slide potentiometers replaced with 200,000 cycle lifetime sliders and installed with new slider knobs
  • All original trimmers replaced with 20-turn versions and precisely calibrated
  • New rubber feet
  • An individualized Dave Rossum signature plaque
  • A dust-proof, crush-proof, lockable Pelican™ brand case with press-and pull latches, wheels, and an extendable handle.
  • Full testing and calibration by Rossum Electro-Music

Yes, there’s a wait list. So Dr. Dre, if you’re reading, go get on it.

I’m lost, to be honest, so coming soon to CDM, I’m proud to launch a new feature: a round-up of what legendary classic gear isn’t being cloned/remade/rebooted.

Actually, if I wait a few days even that story may be unnecessary.

Also, anyone want to take bets on when we get a Behringer BS-1200? (for “Behringer Sampler,” you know…)

The post If you’ve got $7500, you can also have an E-mu SP-1200 sampler remake appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Oh, great, Behringer also have 22 Moog modules I guess?

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 17 Jan 2020 6:27 pm

I’m worried about Behringer. They’re using this time machine a lot, without thinking about the dangers of the temporal paradox.

There’s reason to be concerned.

One, we’ve seen they already have entered some alternate reality where they’re in Banaheim, in the previous video.

Two, I really don’t want to have to write about Moog modules. But here we go. Yes, another video:

The 22 modules come from the System 55, the System 35, and the Model 15, from 1973. Moog Music has already recreated these as ultra-limited, handmade editions; no word yet on what’s actually inside the Behringer remakes.

https://www.moogmusic.com/products/moog-modular-systems

I’m not going to go through these, but it seems Behringer’s plan is to dump a bunch of remakes onto the market. We’ll see what impact that has on the market for other hardware, which has tended to have a significantly higher price point. It seems it will inevitably hit other vintage-inspired modules, but it could impact the market for other modules, too.

See you at Superbooth, I guess? I expect Behringer will be exhibiting again. They may need … a bigger…

There is one big gotcha to all this.

Even at $49 – $99, a full modular system made of these modules will still cost well into four-figure sums.

I love the Moog modular. I learned synthesis on one that lived in the basement of my college – alongside a Buchla. I’ll also admit, that learning process wasn’t easy.

There’s a reason the Minimoog is the Moog that everyone remembers. A lot of the capabilities of this monophonic modular setup are encapsulated in a synth version of the same – keep in mind that the Minimoog’s first prototype of sorts was a demo patch made on the Moog modular.

It’s easy to knock the modern Moog Music for their high prices, comparing against their ultra-boutique, made-for-rockstars modular remake. But try configuring a Eurorack modular piece by piece even from this Behringer range for the price of the $899 Subsequent 25 from Moog this week – and that’s at the high end of that market.

That’s not to knock the unique open-ended spirit of modular. But the test for Behringer is the test for the larger modular community – is there a point where modular synths are too complicated to purchase and use in order to sustain a growing market?

And there’s another question for all of us – musicians and makers alike. Is the 1970s or even 1980s sound of the synthesizer where we want the road to end? Or what should a 2020 synthesizer even sound like?

Should I actually stop asking rhetorical que– ah, okay. I’ll shut up now.

The post Oh, great, Behringer also have 22 Moog modules I guess? appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

News | Beastie Boys & Spike Jonze Team Up For Documentary – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 17 Jan 2020 9:00 am
News | Beastie Boys & Spike Jonze Team Up For Documentary  The Quietus
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