Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » January » 27


The biggest music gear news and best videos to watch from NAMM

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 27 Jan 2020 10:39 pm

The US musical instrument show NAMM dropped the usual amount of gear news on us – now here’s the highlights reel.

The trend lines are pretty easy to spot. Component prices are coming down, and that’s shifting what’s on the market. Modular gear does more. Polysynths and wavetable synths are suddenly in. Audio interfaces with studio-grade specs are now weirdly cheap.

The historic remake trend is showing no signs of abating – not at the high end (KORG’s ARP 2600) nor the low end (Behringer).

If you wanted some big breakthrough in music-making, probably this isn’t your year. Yes, MIDI 2.0 is here, but it’s too young to see any compelling real-world use yet. Yes, Akai has another MPC that runs standalone as well as with a computer, but we’re still mostly dependent on Windows and macOS. These might be the areas to watch in the coming years, since there’s a limit to how much wavetable synthesis and polyphony you can cram into a keyboard and make a usable product.

That’s not to complain, though. Sure, music gear has a lot of 70s and 80s flashbacks, but we’re also spoiled for choice in a business that has loads of offerings that are accessible to a wide range of people.

So let’s have a look – since there’s way too much to watch, a selection of the best videos.

Software doesn’t really demo well and doesn’t need physical distribution, so it makes sense that software news generally spreads year round. But the big software news that did debut was Universal Audio’s Luna recording solution – free software, integrated of course with their hardware. I’ll explain this in a separate article, but here’s a demo:

Synths

This NAMM for electronic musicians was dominated by KORG – the first out of the gate with news, the most news, the most different kind of synth products … enough so that it would be easy to even forget their rich-sounding Wavestate synth, even though it was really the flagship new synth product from them. Here’s what it sounds like:

Here’s Cuckoo looking at sound design:

And yeah, of course there’s also Korg’s remake of the ARP 2600 (also labeled “FS” here, meaning maybe there really is a mini version coming):

Sequential’s Pro 3 oddly has some of the toughest competition from Sequential, but as I wrote previously, it is one of the more compelling new instruments out there. Cuckoo got an early look- and you can hear from none other than creator Dave Smith showing it off:

The MPC One is the hybrid computer/standalone MPC you might actually buy – more compact size, lower price, and some of the early kinks worked out from AKAI’s move into a new direction. I’m a little concerned about whether its horsepower will make it worth jumping from using a PC + controller, but someone will eventually nail this sort of hybrid. Synth Anatomy talked to Akai’s Andy Mac; see also how plug-ins work in an official video:

And audio tracks:

If it’s really a controller you want – or a standalone “hub” – Nektar have their new Aura.

The Udo Super 6 I missed in my underground synth round-up – and it’s definitely something new. FPGA-based, it’s an analog/digital hybrid, wrapped in a body that looks like it escaped from another decade, but in an alternative universe. Cuckoo gushes about the sound:

http://udo-audio.com/

How do you top the mechanical-optical Gamechanger Audio pedal, or their rack-mounted high voltage plasma coil? Why, you need an optical-sensing spring-based reverb pedal, the Light Pedal. I’m sorry, this maker is just damned cool – making stuff you’d expect out of 1960s pulp scifi.

The Moog Subsequent 25 has a lot of the sound powers of the 37, but in a Sub Phatty form factor. Here’s Perfect Circuit with a sound demo:

I didn’t get talk about the Modal Electronics Argon8, but amidst a flurry of new polysynths, this might be the one to beat. Hammering home that point, Modal are now offering three versions, so you can find one that fits your fancy and budget – the 8M and 8X rounding out the line. If comments on this site are to be believed, a lot of you wish synths came in variants with different keybeds and sizes or a keyless version, so here you go. Synthtopia has a nice demo:

Wavetable is everywhere, but Nord are ahead of the curve by moving on to what may be the next returning trend, FM. And the FM engine in their Nordwave 2 looks really powerful, welcome news to fans of their performance synths:

The ASM Hydrasynth is a stupidly powerful new instrument and features the designer/product manager behind some ground-breaking gear from Akai and Arturia (Glen Darcey). I talked about it in September, but this month’s NAMM was its big public showcase, so here are just some sounds:

Previously:

The Blad Kremier-created PULSAR-23 is also now on sale, which might just be the most interesting drum machine offering of 2020. There’s a big waiting list, and I think (?) it was at NAMM, so I’m counting it here. Honestly, fire your current booking, get some high paid techno gigs, use the cash to buy this. Wait, why am I telling you this? I should just go do that.

Doepfer are back with a joystick module – actually a pleasant surprise, as these sorts of components are not easy to come by these days:

I covered these instruments before, but here are deeper looks at the indie synths debuting this month.

The Liven 8bit Warps looks nicely mental:

Erica Synth’s own Girts debuts the DB-01 bassline in a jam.

Modular

Verbos have a full line of new modules:

4ms have a massive creation called the Ensemble Oscillators – 16 complex oscillators in a single unit:

Pittsburgh Modular, for their part, are doing loads of delays instead of loads of oscillators. Meet the Cascading Delay Network:

Audio interfaces

High-end audio interfaces are no longer an expensive proposition, it seems – but USB is here to stay.

Take the new SSL interfaces, which even include the companies’ 4000 series EQ and saturation. There’s something trippy about seeing a giant SSL knob, but then no one will mistake who these came from. Street price for this thing is just above a couple hundred bucks for the basic model, and comes with SSL software, too.

MOTU’s M Series are also out in the wild, and worth consideration:

There’s also a race to make audio interfaces that are less intimidating to new users. iZotope have tried that with their Spire interface; somewhere in between that kind of radical solution and a bread-and-butter box is the Audient Evo – a stylish box that still does mostly what the other boxes do, but with a “smart gain” feature and more modern looks. Now whether that’s really the biggest problem everyone faces or not, I don’t know. (Not to dismiss this, but I think the issues with desktop OSes and reliability are more daunting than how to set gain properly. Still, this could be a part of a larger puzzle.)

It’s not all USB interfaces, though. Presonus also have a full range of new gear, which SonicState details – including Thunderbolt and lots more IO. But prices of thesefeatures are also coming down.

And from left field…

The dream of alternative keyboard layouts never dies. Now there’s the Lumatone CORTEX, with a whopping 275 keys and RGB. So if you think it’s outrageous to spend four grand on a remake of the ARP 2600 and want something more forward-looking – well, clearly you have to spend your four grand on a microtonal keyboard instead, or you’re a damned hypocrite!

And yes, by far the weirdest new invention: a MIDI harmonica, from Sweden’s Father and Son.

If you dream of playing music on a hockey puck rather than a hamonica, then I suggest instead the Ariphon Orba. (Okay, they say “half an orange” and a gaming controller.) There is actual onboard sound capability, but it’s also a wireless MIDI controller. Like I said, some ideas just don’t go away.

https://artiphon.com/pages/orba

The post The biggest music gear news and best videos to watch from NAMM appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FCC Commissioner Asks Record Labels for Information About Payola Practices – What are the FCC Rules?  How Do These Practices Compare to Online Music Providers?

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 27 Jan 2020 5:52 pm

Last week, FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly was in the news for sending a letter to the major record labels asking for information about their practices in paying broadcast stations for airing the label’s music.  The letter follows correspondence last year between the Commissioner and the RIAA (the Recording Industry’s trade group) asking for similar information, which the RIAA claimed that it did not have.  This process began after a Rolling Stone magazine article suggested that “payola” was still a common practice in the broadcast industry.  These actions, and the press reports that followed, raise a couple of interesting questions including what the FCC rules are on payola, and how broadcast practices compare to those of online companies.

The Communications Act prohibits the practice of “payola” by requiring, in Section 317, that when any content is aired on a station in exchange for anything of value, the station must disclose that “consideration” has been paid by the person or entity that pays for the consideration.  Thus, “payola” arises when a broadcast station employee or contractor receives or is promised anything of value in return for putting any content on the air, and that payment is not disclosed to the public.  Payola usually occurs when someone makes a gift or payment to a person involved in station programming (i.e., station employees, program producers, program suppliers) in exchange for favorable on-air exposure of a product or service.  While the term “payola” is most often associated with the receipt by a station announcer or music director of money, trips or other value for playing songs on the station, the same prohibition applies whenever any station programming personnel receive anything of value in exchange for airing any content where a sponsorship identification is not broadcast.  For examples of fines for airing programming for which consideration was received without acknowledging the receipt of valuable consideration, outside the context of music, see our articles here, here and here

Section 317 requires that stations take actions to ensure that their employees and program suppliers disclose consideration received for airing program content.  Most radio stations do this through routine distribution to their employees of payola policies, and in many cases getting affidavits from employees acknowledging that they have received information about the FCC requirements and understand the obligations.

Note that payola only exists where there is no disclosure of the receipt of something of value for the on-air content.  Payola is not an issue when full disclosure is made.  It is the lack of sponsorship disclosure that makes the transaction illegal.  Thus, a station is not in violation of the rules, even if it is paid to air songs or program segments, if on-air disclosure of the payment or other consideration is made.  The disclosure is supposed to be made at the time that the sponsored material is aired.

While payola (playing music for consideration without disclosing the consideration) may be illegal for broadcasters, the Commissioner notes in his letter that some have requested that this prohibition be reexamined in light of the current state of the marketplace, where broadcasters are competing against other distributors of programming who may not be subject to such rules.  While there are general obligations to disclose consideration for material transmitted for consideration via Internet platforms, those obligations are far less stringent than those of broadcasters (obligations for online platforms include general sponsorship disclosure obligations imposed by the FTC, see our article here, and state laws may apply to online platforms, see our article here).  Those disclosure obligations are often met in disclosures that are less obvious than those that are required of broadcasters.  If one looks, for instance, at the terms of service for online music platforms, there are statements that acknowledge that some may be receiving consideration for their music selections, but these are often very general statements buried in the site’s terms of use.  There is, for instance, this disclosure on one music service’s site:

In any part of the [NAME OF SERVICE] Service, the Content you access, including its selection and placement, may be influenced by commercial considerations, including [SERVICE’S] agreements with third parties.

While the standards may be different from those that apply to their online competition, right now, for broadcasters, they are still strict.  Broadcasters should ensure that they are educating their staffs about the obligations to identify when on-air content has been sponsored so that the proper disclosures can be made.  As violations of these requirements can result not only in FCC fines but also in criminal actions (see 47 U.S.C. Section 507), knowing the rules is very important.  This article provides just a snapshot of those rules – study them in detail and talk with your counsel about the obligations they impose to avoid the potentially serious consequences that can result if they are not followed.

Reviews | T3 – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Mon 27 Jan 2020 9:00 am
Reviews | T3  The Quietus
TunePlus Wordpress Theme