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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » February


INNINGS FESTIVAL 2020 IS THIS WEEKEND + SCORE SOME TICKETS!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Sat 29 Feb 2020 5:30 pm
Music, baseball and sunshine in Tempe, Arizona.

One to watch: Sofia Kourtesis

Delivered... Holly Williams | Scene | Sat 29 Feb 2020 3:00 pm

The Berlin-based producer is a musical magpie with a distinct dancefloor-friendly style

Listen to the opening number of the Peruvian-born producer Sofia Kourtesis’s first, self-titled EP, and you imagine a train made of rackety sonic junk clattering down a track. Its destination? A good time, surely: while her brand of house may be arrestingly distinct, clicking and juddering with distorted vocals and fragments of field recordings, she always keeps her eyes firmly on the dancefloor rather than the navel.

Kourtesis, who is based in Berlin, started out in a hip-hop band at 18 (“We were really bad”) before migrating to the mixing deck after meeting her now ex-partner Derwin Schlecker, AKA Gold Panda, and later becoming a booker for clubs including Berlin’s Funkhaus. Released last year by Studio Barnhus, the eclectic Stockholm-based dance label, the EP won glowing reviews (Pitchfork called it “magical”).

Sarita Colonia is out now on Studio Barnhus

Continue reading...

Features | Tome On The Range | Tomorrow Belonged To Them: Kraftwerk’s Future Music From Germany – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Sat 29 Feb 2020 9:00 am
Features | Tome On The Range | Tomorrow Belonged To Them: Kraftwerk's Future Music From Germany  The Quietus

Celebrate MeeB-leap Day weekend with these great synth vids – or make your own

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 11:34 pm

One extra day in the calendar is clearly a reason to spend one extra day playing with synths and making and sharing music. So we’ve decided to get MeeBlip in on that.

We’ve got synths and accessories in stock in our MeeBlip store now. But we also wanted to reach out to all of you who have one of the instruments we’ve made and hear (and see, if you want) what you’re making.

Part of why I know this will be fun is because I’m always surprised by videos like this one by YouTuber lifeisfortytwo – whoever you are. This is honestly to me the whole pleasure of making independent instruments and independent music, making connections to people.

(Oh, if you’re in this post, you can still message us, by the way!)

We’ll give out some thru5 MIDI splitter kits to reward our favorites, and hopefully give some extra fame to as many as we can.

Here’s how our MeeB-leap Day celebration works:

1. Find a jam or live set or track or whatever you made with your MeeBlip – or record a new one.

2. Upload audio only if you prefer (somewhere like SoundCloud), or video if you’re showing off your synth-tweaking fingers or other graphics (somewhere like YouTube or Facebook).

Send the link to us. Just put “B-Leap Day” in the subject header, and we’ll have a look. Send to:

meeblip@reflexaudio.com

We’ll point people to your Facebook page or YouTube or SoundCloud or Instagram channels so you can get some extra followers! (Well, unless you really prefer we put them on ours, in which case just say so!) If you recorded some stuff in “Jam-uary,” that counts, too! And we’ll be in touch if we can throw you a thru5 kit.

For more MeeBlip action, here’s the excellent Sensel Morph as a command center for our geode alongside out friends KORG volca beats and Roland SH-01A:

There’s even this clever video showing our MeeBlip cubit go MIDI interface as a smart accessory for the Teenage Engineering OP-Z! (I actually just found this by typing in a search. Thanks!)

And for added inspiration, one more flashback to that time and went and visited Sir HAINBACH:

You can also reach us by messaging our MeeBlip social accounts:

https://www.facebook.com/meeblip/

Or come visit the site:

https://meeblip.com/

See you on the Internet.

The post Celebrate MeeB-leap Day weekend with these great synth vids – or make your own appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Gaze into the geometric sound and visual world of Alva Noto, with UNIEQAV

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 8:46 pm

German music and media master Alva Noto, aka Carsten Nicolai, has released his full UNIEQAV audiovisual show online. In other words – get your sine wave on, ears and eyeballs, from the comfort of your own home.

As you’d expect from the Noton founder, the world of UNIEQAV is digital in its purest sense – mathematics and code on full display, raw single-cycle wavetables, minimal graphics celebrating color and line.

The full playlist is on YouTube. Some of these clips are not advisable if you have epilepsy. (Oddly, the things that trigger epilepsy victims make me really calm, which I presume says something about the brain, and makes me wish I better-understood neurology and perception.)

Some pleasing moments:

All sound and conception/design is Carsten Nicolai/Alva Noto, with visuals programmed by NIBO FX of Mohali, India. (Also on YouTube.)

The 2018 album is available direct (including lossless, physical) on the Noton site:

https://noton.greedbag.com/buy/unieqav/

For higher quality movies, check Apple Music. (Hey, “would you like to watch some Alva Noto on my giant flat panel in high res” would probably get me to come home with you, so I guess I’m a digital media nerd.)

https://music.apple.com/us/artist/alva-noto/27060192#see-all/recent-videos

Carsten once told us in a talk I moderated at SONAR, alongside Raster founder and friend/collaborator Olaf Bender, that these abstractions were a way of resisting audiovisual propaganda. It’s programming, then, not to serve a pre-defined narrative, but for programming’s sake – mathematical philosophy and objectivism.

I suspect it’s also possible Carsten really, really likes Japan. This piece references Tokyo’s UNIT nightclub, third in a series there. I suppose one personal attraction for me to both Germany and Japan is that they both contemplate tools as art – whether it’s Berlin and software code, or traditional Japan and the careful study and trade of even utensils of tea preparation. I don’t even mean that by analogy – I think many of us who care about sound and visuals also consider time spent contemplating their tools to be part of the process. I can easily imagine that also is part of the connection for Alva Noto artworks.

At least in modern Japan, strict rules governing dancing may also have produced a particular environment for audiovisual work. A 67-year dancing ban has meant that a nightclub is not synonymous with a dancefloor. Even with those laws loosened, it’s not uncommon today to see people stand in contemplation of a show, presumably as a remnant of this history. But for the club-artwork mix of classic Alva Noto, it fits.

I haven’t gotten to speak with Carsten about this and whether it’s connected, but Japanese aesthetics and a history playing there have been part of the whole (former) Raster-Noton crew. Oh, plus Noton will sell you a very attractive Japanese calendar. I also like their logo. Can’t put my finger on why, exactly.

If you’re in Berlin rather than Japan, you can catch Carsten and his brother go up against Robert Lippok and his brother in a back to back to back to back DJ pairing at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin and Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. (Seriously, that is the full name of the museum. When German can’t make really long single words, it can still compensate by making really long names for things with multiple words!)

It’s a DJ battle for the ages, and true to form for Carsten’s art world savvy, it also makes the museum the showcase for music. I cannot report for certain whether this “battle” is also a contest for the honor of the two labels Noton and Raster, but it at least makes a fine show of fraternity and love of music. Enjoy that tomorrow night; I’m in Montreal.

Here is that talk, maybe one of the last to put Olaf and Carsten together onstage as Raster-Noton, though – it’s all still in the family, even as each label and platform now focuses elegantly on their own direction.

(That’s of course Olaf, not Carsten in the thumbnail, but you get all of us in black or whatever.)

For a review of an earlier show, Inverted Audio has some thoughtful words on Alva Noto & Anne-James Chaton live at The Barbican.

Image at top: SONAR Istanbul 2018 performance of this show, photo Feli Gutiérres.

The post Gaze into the geometric sound and visual world of Alva Noto, with UNIEQAV appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FCC Seeks Comments on the State of the Communications Marketplace – Including for Audio and Video

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 5:51 pm

The FCC yesterday released a Public Notice calling for public comment on the state of the communications marketplace so that it can prepare a report to Congress – a report that is required every even-numbered year.  The Notice calls for comments on the state of competition in various sectors of the communications industry – including for audio and video.  The inclusion of audio in this report is relatively new – being included for the first time two years ago (see our article here).  Comments in this proceeding are due on April 13, with replies due May 13.

The Audio Competition Report prepared two years ago was very important in informing the FCC as to the state of competition in that segment of the market.  Comments filed with the Commission on the report were incorporated in the record of the FCC’s Quadrennial Review Notice of Proposed Rulemaking which entertained the possibility of changes in the ownership rules for broadcast radio in light of the substantial competition that comes from digital audio sources (see our article here on the Quadrennial Review NPRM).  Whether this year’s report will be as crucial is unknown, as the Third Circuit Court of Appeals decision on the FCC’s 2017 ownership rule changes have, for now, put all broadcast ownership changes on hold while the FCC (and the Department of Justice) decide whether to appeal that case to the Supreme Court or to attempt to answer the Third Circuit’s concerns that the FCC had not sufficiently addressed the impact of changes in its ownership rules on minority ownership (see our articles here and here).  While these decisions are being made, it appears that all ownership changes are on hold.

Nevertheless, comments in this proceeding will provide the FCC and Congress with an updated view of where the marketplace in audio and video stand so that, when either decides to look at changes in regulations that affect radio or TV, they will have current information on the state of competition.  Thus, even though there may not be imminent changes in the ownership rules that result from the report that the FCC will generate from the responses to this Notice, comments are still important.

In video, the FCC is looking for information about the competition between broadcast television, MVPDs (cable and satellite TV) and online video providers – including comments on the difference in the regulatory environment that may affect competition between these players.  Specific issues on which the FCC seeks comments include:

  • Competition in the provision of video programming services
  • Vertical integration
  • Technological developments
  • Recent entry and exit in the marketplace
  • Trends (e.g., declining MVPD subscriptions, increasing virtual MVPD (vMVPD) prices, fragmentation of Video on Demand (VOD) content, household subscription to multiple video services)
  • Service features (e.g., live vs VOD content, pricing, commercials, device compatibility, leased equipment) that lead some video programming services to be viewed as substitutes for one another and others as supplements
  • Operating and financial statistics including subscriptions, subscription revenue, advertising revenue, retransmission consent fee revenue, and any other sources of revenue
  • Data and comment that will help the Commission analyze how the ongoing evolution in the video programming market affects competition in the related market for set-top boxes and devices, including how it affects the extent to which consumer choice for devices to access MVPD content remains a relevant aspect of the competitive environment

Similar information is requested about the audio marketplace.  The FCC is looking at competition between over-the-air radio, satellite radio and online audio services.  It asks about regulatory constraints on the competition between players in this marketplace.  Specific areas on which the FCC seeks information include:

  • Industry participants in the provision of audio programming services
  • Trends in service offerings, pricing, and consumer behavior
  • The extent of competition among audio marketplace participants, including intramodal competition (i.e., competition among providers of the same type, such as terrestrial radio broadcast stations) and intermodal competition (i.e., competition among providers of different types, such as terrestrial radio broadcast stations and satellite radio providers)
  • Ratings, subscribership, and revenue information, for the marketplace as a whole and for individual industry participants
  • Capital investment, innovation, and the deployment of advanced technology
  • Requirements for entry into the marketplace
  • Recent entry into and exit from the marketplace

As we noted above, comments are due April 13 in this proceeding that will help the FCC establish the competitive framework that will inform its regulatory actions, as well as those of Congress, in the coming years. The FCC needs to know about the fundamental changes that have taken place in the marketplace, so that its regulation reflects today’s competitive environment, not that of some point in the distant past.

Vladislav Delay: Rakka review – techno from the end of the world

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 10:30 am

(Cosmo Rhythmatic)
Inspired by the arctic tundra and the climate crisis, the Finnish producer’s angriest work to date is a mix of unstable, deconstructed beats and bludgeoning noise

Most people tend to start out angry at injustice in the world, and then have that anger pared down by the passage of time until they’re playing golf and voting Conservative. Vladislav Delay, AKA Finnish producer Sasu Ripatti, has done the reverse. As Luomo in the mid-00s, he evolved the elegant minimal house that plays in cocktail bars into its ideal form. Sensual and subtly detailed, his tracks had a quiet toughness, but all certainly felt well with the world. His Vladislav Delay moniker was for even more beatific ambient techno. But by the time of his 2012 masterpiece Kuopio, its equally strong sister EP Espoo and the skittish jazz-techno fusion group Vladislav Delay Quartet, disquiet had crept in. The beats drummed like quick, nervous fingers on a tabletop, or a steady fist at a door.

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News | Recently Discovered Deep-Sea Creature Named After Metallica – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 9:00 am
News | Recently Discovered Deep-Sea Creature Named After Metallica  The Quietus

News | Laurel Halo To Release Debut Soundtrack – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 9:00 am
News | Laurel Halo To Release Debut Soundtrack  The Quietus

Features | Quietus Charts | Music Of The Month: The Best Albums And Tracks Of February 2020 – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 9:00 am
Features | Quietus Charts | Music Of The Month: The Best Albums And Tracks Of February 2020  The Quietus

Caribou: Suddenly review – perfectly imperfect pop

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 27 Feb 2020 3:31 pm

(City Slang)
Dan Snaith’s project returns after five years away to confront grief and family, beautifully warping songs that are drenched in melody

Some artists’ careers seem to progress according to a carefully calculated plan, and there are others whose career seems to progress as a result of happy accidents and unexpected outcomes. Dan Snaith, who records as Caribou and Daphni, belongs firmly in the latter category. In the early 00s, he started out making critically acclaimed electronica that variously tilted towards psychedelia, krautrock and the wistful techno of Boards of Canada; he did it while studying for a PhD in pure mathematics, which added to its cerebral, rarefied air. There were artists who seemed less likely than Snaith to release an Ibiza-approved dancefloor banger, but they largely resided in the realms of funeral doom metal and musique concrète.

This made it a surprise to everyone – including Snaith – when Sun, a track from 2010’s Swim, became an Ibiza-approved dancefloor banger. To compound his amazement further, Caribou unexpectedly went from being a live act who played small venues to audiences that seemed not unlike Snaith himself – a self-described “music nerdy-type person” – to a reliably festival-rousing draw. He described Swim’s follow-up, Our Love, as “mind-numbingly straightforward”. It was anything but – wildly unconventional and dealing in subtleties and weird juxtapositions, which didn’t stop it making the UK Top 10.

Continue reading...

Caribou: Suddenly review – perfectly imperfect pop

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 27 Feb 2020 3:31 pm

(City Slang)
Dan Snaith’s project returns after five years away to confront grief and family, beautifully warping songs that are drenched in melody

Some artists’ careers seem to progress according to a carefully calculated plan, and there are others whose career seems to progress as a result of happy accidents and unexpected outcomes. Dan Snaith, who records as Caribou and Daphni, belongs firmly in the latter category. In the early 00s, he started out making critically acclaimed electronica that variously tilted towards psychedelia, krautrock and the wistful techno of Boards of Canada; he did it while studying for a PhD in pure mathematics, which added to its cerebral, rarefied air. There were artists who seemed less likely than Snaith to release an Ibiza-approved dancefloor banger, but they largely resided in the realms of funeral doom metal and musique concrète.

This made it a surprise to everyone – including Snaith – when Sun, a track from 2010’s Swim, became an Ibiza-approved dancefloor banger. To compound his amazement further, Caribou unexpectedly went from being a live act who played small venues to audiences that seemed not unlike Snaith himself – a self-described “music nerdy-type person” – to a reliably festival-rousing draw. He described Swim’s follow-up, Our Love, as “mind-numbingly straightforward”. It was anything but – wildly unconventional and dealing in subtleties and weird juxtapositions, which didn’t stop it making the UK Top 10.

Continue reading...

THE COMPLETE CREAMFIELDS 2020 LINEUP IS OUT

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 27 Feb 2020 3:30 pm
So. Many. Great. Names. It's the world's biggest electronic music festival lineup.

THE HANGOUT FEST FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP IS OUT + SCORE TICKETS!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 27 Feb 2020 2:30 pm
Soak up the sun while you listen to great music on a great beach in the Gulf of Mexico.

News | Roskilde Completes 2020 Line-Up – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 27 Feb 2020 9:00 am
News | Roskilde Completes 2020 Line-Up  The Quietus
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