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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » February » 12


YOU CAN STILL GET COACHELLA TICKETS!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2020 7:30 pm
It's not too late to get Coachella tickets! See who's in the Coachella lineup and get the latest news and a description of the festival!

Prototypes are free, open-source plug-ins – use them for sound, or to learn Csound

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2020 7:24 pm

Get a free algorithmic bass drum generator, a lo-fi modulator, a massive granular workstation, for free – and that’s just the beginning.

Micah Frank is one of the most prolific sound designer-inventor-composer types around, via his Puremagnetik soundware label and personal projects. Lately, he’s been turning some of these larger, more experimental projects into free tools that you can both use in your own music – and learn from and expand.

Last summer, we saw an expansive, unparalleled granular tool take form as both album and free code:

But now, Micah has gone further – way further. The new series is a set of plug-ins called Prototypes. That granular instrument from last summer has become what is really a full-fledged tool like no other, and now is available in plug-in form. There are new tools in a slightly more pre-release state, true to the “prototype” name. But all are ready to use – and they offer a window into the power of Csound, the fully free and open-source omni-platform sound toolkit that is descended the very first digital audio tools ever created.

Available already:

Kickblast (an algorithmic bass drum generator)

Parallel (a lo-fi modulator)

And a much developed (not so prototype-ish) plugin version of my multitrack granular workstation Grainstation C

Pre-built plug-ins for VST and Audio Unit are available for macOS and 64-bit Windows. I think it’s trivial to build for some other platforms (I need to check that out), or you can also run in Csound directly. Find those in the Builds section of his GitHub:

https://github.com/micah-frank-studio/Prototypes/tree/master/Builds

It’s all open-source (GNU GPLv2 license), and while you can run it as a plug-in, the sound code is all in Csound. Full repository:

https://github.com/micah-frank-studio/Prototypes

Micah tells CDM he hopes that some of you will discover what Csound can do in your own work. ” Csound is my favorite,” Micah says. The “spectral, granular, convolution sound” is one of the best available, he raves. “I feel like it needs an awareness push, as the music-making community is much more ready to code than they were in the ’80s. And the learning curve from Max (or even a modular system) to Csound is not so bad.”

Noted.

Follow Micah on Instagram, so you get some pretty nature shots interspersed with your music nerd goodness. My kind of influencer.

https://www.instagram.com/micah.frank.studio/

The post Prototypes are free, open-source plug-ins – use them for sound, or to learn Csound appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Someone made a Pomodoro timer for Ableton Live, so you can stay productive, take breaks

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2020 5:45 pm

Productivity engineering has come to music production. A popular method for timeboxing is now available as a free Live add-on.

Have you ever sighed in relief to have a big, uninterrupted span of time – only to wind up wiling it all away with procrastination? And then have you found yourself with a particular deadline – like an hour left in your music studio before your partner arrives to kick you out – and suddenly find you’re focused?

The basic principle here is that, paradoxically, even as we hate schedules and deadlines, constraints can help us focus. By constraining our time, or timeboxing, we can concentrate more easily on a particular task.

The Pomodoro Technique is this boiled down to a really simple cycle. It’s named for a kitchen timer – you know, the thing often called an egg timer because it’s shaped like an egg, but in this case apparently with a model shaped like a tomato. It’s the late-80s invention of Francesco Cirillo, who I understand even liked the ticking sound. I hate ticking – uh, especially while making music – but sometimes setting a timer can make it easier to tackle a task you’re putting off.

While invented in the late 80s, Pomodoro Technique has spread more widely in the productivity craze of the Internet age. Of course, there’s a Lifehacker guide to getting started. (It was even updated as recently as last summer.) And yes, Francesco is around and will gladly take your money.

Now, it may seem a little strange to do this when you’re working on music, which most of us think of as a diversion. Isn’t music supposed to be endlessly fun and something we can concentrate on without any challenge? But apart from more rote work or making a Max for Live patch or carefully editing envelopes, anything that requires you to focus your brain benefits from breaks.

And that’s really what the Pomodoro Technique is about. It’s not actually the 25 minutes of focus that is the most important. It’s the break. (Perhaps part of why you’re so eager to procrastinate is a legitimate impulse by your brain that you’re overly and unnaturally focused on something.)

There’s plenty of science to back this up. Selecting just one useful overview:

Brief diversions vastly improve focus, researchers find [ScienceDaily summary; original paper in Cognition, 2001]

There are lots and lots of Pomodoro-themed timers out there – or you can use any timer (as on your phone, wristwatch, a physical egg timer, whatever). (The Pomodoro timers sometimes have special features dedicated to the technique, and at least pictures of tomatoes, which as a fan of the veget— erm, fruit – I enjoy.)

pATCHES, a site and Patreon subscription creating resources for producers, has an experimental Max for Live plug-in. Apart from letting you run the thing inside your session, it even stops your transport when you’re due for a break – if you find that useful.

https://patches.zone/max-for-live/pomodoro

I’m curious to hear if people find this useful. It is easy to forget that, as much as we mystify music process, what we’re really taking care of is our brain.

The post Someone made a Pomodoro timer for Ableton Live, so you can stay productive, take breaks appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Sound Off: DJ False Witness Rails Against the Industry’s Gatekeeping Audiophilia

Delivered... Caroline Whiteley | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2020 5:01 pm

Wu Tsang’s video piece “Into a Space of Love” (2019) features the legendary American drag queen and nightlife personality Kevin Aviance on the topic of the “good” house record. In the interview, Aviance outlines an old DJ practice of dropping the needle on a random spot and, for a brief three seconds, listening to a record in order to create an instinctual, binary value judgment:

Source

FORECASTLE FESTIVAL 2020 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2020 4:00 pm
Jack Johnson, Cage The Elephant and The 19775 headline! Tash Sultana, Rainbow Kitten Surprise, Brockhampton, Umphrey's McGee, Jack Harlow and Gryffin also top the lineup!
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