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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » April » 03


Begone, webcams: Dixon will premiere an album in gorgeous 3D mixed reality, today

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 7:25 pm

We’ve gazed into grainy video feeds and literally watched multi-camera shoots of empty clubs. But we’re also starting to see a move into futuristic 3D and mixed reality – starting with one unique album premiere from the Innervisions mastermind.

The feed is tonight Berlin time, that’s 10PM CET so 4PM NYC time, 1PM California. (And yeah, my heart is with you right now, America, even as I type the letters NYC – and many other places worldwide. I know this is beyond tough; I’m watching and listening. If you want to join for Dixon distraction in 3D, please say hi.)

In a global crisis, one key element to look for in culture is people who were working on something before all of this, and that might endure through and after. So Dixon qualifies. He already DJed virtually (thanks to motion capture, a collaboration with Rockstar Games, and an appearance in Grand Theft Auto V Online, which you can still go visit in the game). And he had unveiled his Transmoderna project, which at least had the lofty goal of turning a club into something immersive. It’s hard to untangle what that means from the description, and I don’t tend to hang out in Ibiza. It seems in PR materials, everything in Ibiza starts to turn into some high-concept club-marketing gobbledygook – but yeah, his residency hosting everyone from the Innervisions crew to Mano le Tough to Honey Dijon also had the notion of developing immersive technology and reimagining what a club was.

Let’s skip to what is actually happening now, tonight Berlin time, as it at least starts to plumb this question of “what could be on a video feed that isn’t just a camera pointed at a bunch of clubgoers?”

The clubgoers for something like Boiler Room are now legally removed, their absence mandated by German contact limits in this pandemic. But the supercomputer on your desk and the supercomputer in your pocket were already capable of doing other things.

So Dixon tonight will perform a mixed reality DJ set as part of the Transmoderna collaboration, and to debut unreleased music of the same name. The artist says he’s building his Dj set already from this material. (No word on who yet, but previously announced collaborations on this moniker included Âme, Mathew Jonson, Echonomist, Trikk, Frank Wiedemann, and Roman Flügel.)

It’s really the visual material that starts to show promise, though – see the images here. Bleeding-edge visualist studio SELAM X has created an alien fishtank for the artist to inhabit tonight – and you can see the wonderful creatures they’re producing.

The whole thing will run in a game engine – fitting, as platforms like Twitch were streaming games while the club community was still just showing, well, clubs. And beyond that, I don’t know what to expect. But I’ll be tuning in, as this feels less like “DJ mix plus webcam” and more like something worth seeing on a screen.

I hope to talk to one of the artists at SELAM X soon, so take a look, let us know what you think, and if you have questions.

But I do suspect there’s a lot of potential here. And hey, if you want to catch Dixon and The Black Madonna in GTA V, too, I’m game. It’s more fun than watching Facebook Live chat hang my browser tabs, I know that. (Hey – I believe in computers and the Internet. We will get there, because we can.)

https://www.facebook.com/dixoninnervisions/

https://www.instagram.com/selamxstudio/

The post Begone, webcams: Dixon will premiere an album in gorgeous 3D mixed reality, today appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Rules to Live By, Part I

Delivered... whitney | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 5:55 pm

Our newest series Ode to the Night captures the rave as a rite of passage. Each personal essay reveals how the party scene is as much about hedonism and celebration as it is about coming of age. In the inaugural piece, writer Geoffrey Mak searches for himself within a helix of self-destruction and enlightenment during his first year in a new city. This is part one of his two-part personal essay. &#

Source

Streamlabs is an easier, free all-in-one streaming app, now on Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 5:40 pm

Start with OBS, the now industry-standard streaming app, and add a bunch of special sauce to make it easier and friendlier. Now you’ve got Streamlabs – and it just added Mac support to its other platforms.

Mention live streaming any time in the past year or so, and someone no doubt told you to use OBS. Open Broadcaster Software, aka OBS Studio, is indeed free and powerful – not only for streaming but live recording, too. (It quietly displaced a lot of pricey and often incomplete commercial screencasting software, too.)

OBS has gotten a lot easier – a cash infusion from Twitch, Facebook, NVIDIA, and Logitech no doubt helped. But it’s still a bit intimidating as far as configuring settings for recording, to say nothing of the manual settings required to then make it upload to various streaming platforms.

That’s where Streamlabs comes in. It’s got its own desktop apps based on OBS, plus apps that let you easily stream from Android and iOS, too. So while you could do all of this on OBS desktop, Streamlabs makes it easier – basically, it’s a bit like having a custom distro of OBS. And then by adding mobile access, those platforms become easier, too.

Looks like OBS – but 100% less intimidating.

So in addition to all the things that make OBS powerful – using any video source or onscreen inputs, switching between them, handling resolutions and recording as well as connecting, you get:

  • Pre-configured streaming platforms and easy login (think YouTube, Twitch, Facebook, etc.)
  • Auto-optimized video settings
  • Custom alerts (so you can also beg for donations, add engagement)
  • Themes and widgets for customizing your stream
  • Built-in chat (normally requiring you to open another window in OBS, which gets surprisingly clumsy fast)
  • Easy recording
  • Cloud backups (so you don’t lose your recording)

https://streamlabs.com

Honestly, having played around with it a bit, maybe the best part of Streamlabs is that all the power of OBS is there, but easier to use. So it doesn’t feel like a dumbed-down version of OBS so much as a polished, beginner-friendly interface with all the same features – and some useful additions.

The easier-to-follow Sources dialog alone is probably worth the price of admission. And price of admission is free, anyway.

The mobile apps also feature a lot of nice integrations on these lines, too. Think similar cross-platform streaming support, importing OBS settings from desktop, and adding widgets for events, donations, and chat.

https://streamlabs.com/mobile-app

The spin here of OBS is open source, like its sibling. It’s based on Electron, so I hope that now that macOS was added, we’ll see Linux, too. Linux users should meanwhile note that OBS packaging has improved a lot across distros, and Ubuntu Studio for instance even bakes a pre-configured OBS right into the OS. I have no idea how much work would be required to do the same with Streamlabs. (PS, you can beta test 20.04 LTS right now and help them squash bugs before what I think will be a very essential global pandemic stay-at-home OS release!)

So, since this is free and open source, what’s the business model?

Basically, you can grab this for free and have a nicer version of OBS. Tips and donations to content makers go 100% to you – no cut for Streamlabs. (Good – and a major difference with a lot of horrible startups.)

Then for a monthly fee, you can add additional effects (US$4.99/month, “PRO”), or a bunch of custom widgets, custom domain and website, and other extras (Prime, $12/mo billed annually).

https://streamlabs.com/pricing

I hope they allow month-to-month billing, but regardless, it’s nice to see a business built on open source software and that still has sustainable business support. (CDM is possible because of just that idea – thank WordPress.)

I’m sure some people are groaning at me even sharing this information, given how many streams are out there right now. But”streaming” doesn’t necessarily mean to a wide audience – it’s useful in any case where you want to teleport yourself around the world (while under stay-at-home orders, for instance) even if it’s to a small group. Plus, even if you haven’t been struggling with this yourself, now you can tip off your friends so they don’t a) bug you for how to set up their stream and/or b) stream really low-quality material you have to then watch.

And I think just as with blogs, the question is not really quantity or openness, but quality – and whether there’s a model for supporting the people putting out that quality. More on this soon.

The post Streamlabs is an easier, free all-in-one streaming app, now on Mac, Windows, iOS, and Android appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Minor Science: Second Language review – expectation-defying beats

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 10:30 am

(Whities)
Debut album cleverly morphs and melds its 90s palette without sliding into nostalgia, but there are occasional longueurs

The inspiration behind Minor Science’s debut album is one that’s sure to resonate with many of his fellow English-speaking electronic music artists and peers who have relocated to Berlin over the years. Second Language is the result of the producer and DJ’s fascination with language and translation, a byproduct of picking up German (and perhaps his own extensive work with words – many in the scene may first have known Minor Science as dance music journalist Angus Finlayson). He’s been communicating his ideas through sound for some eight years or so, breaking through with off-techno 12-inches for quirky, peripherally club-oriented labels the Trilogy Tapes and Whities. With writing on the backburner and DJing paying the bills, he has one of electronica’s more peculiar and curious albums to show for his transition to the studio.

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Yaeji: What We Drew 우리가 그려왔던 review – dance music for an existential crisis

Delivered... Aimee Cliff | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 9:00 am

(XL Recordings)
Straddling the blurry line between dream pop and DIY house, the Korean-American’s first full-length effort is a diaristic work of startling emotional clarity

Korean-American DJ and producer Yaeji – full name Kathy Yaeji Lee – is the queen of introverted club music. She broke through with her squelchy house track Raingurl in 2017, contrasting a bold bassline with deadpan vocals about her glasses fogging up in the club. On her new mixtape, her first release for XL Recordings, Lee digs even further into her interior landscape, with diaristic, spacious house music on which she sings about subjects like the difficulty of getting out of bed (on the glimmering lead single Waking Up Down). As we enter a nightclub-less era of isolation, she’s timed it eerily well: this is dance music to soundtrack – and soothe – an existential crisis.

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News | RIP Bill Withers – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 8:00 am
News | RIP Bill Withers  The Quietus

Features | A Quietus Interview | The Right Reasons: Dan Carey Of Speedy Wunderground Interviewed – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 3 Apr 2020 8:00 am
Features | A Quietus Interview | The Right Reasons: Dan Carey Of Speedy Wunderground Interviewed  The Quietus
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