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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » April » 16


Elektron’s Overbridge 2 is here, promises to deliver on ambitious machine-computer integration

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 16 Apr 2020 7:35 pm

For Elektron’s flagship instruments, Overbridge has evolved from a way of solving routing to a full-functioning computer portal to their machines.

To say that Elektron fans have been anticipating this would be an understatement. Obsessing over? Haunting Elektron, asking when or if it would ever happen? Trolling Elektron, convinced it wouldn’t? Closer.

The sheer depth of Overbridge 2.0 starts to indicate why there was a wait – and why it might have been worth it. First off, this is not for people who own the new entry-level Model:Samples and Model:Cycles. These budget-priced models are all about just twisting the knobs and playing, as we saw yesterday, so just have at it.

Overbridge 2.0 is ready now for the other current top-of-rnage – not a beta, not a preview, but the real deal, at last. And that includes support for Digitakt, Digitone, Digitone Keys, Analog Rytm MKI/MKII, Analog Four MKI/MKII, Analog Heat MKI/MKII, and Analog Keys, on Windows and macOS. (For specifics of which Elektron firmware and which OS, check the download page. Windows is Windows 10 only; the Mac is a little gentler with 10.12+.)

Yeah, no Octatrack. But the other instruments and drum machines are well covered.

What you get is both standalone and plug-in software that lets you treat the computer as a window into your Elektron box, and your Elektron box as an extension of your computer. That was always the idea and sales pitch of Overbridge, but now we see it in the flesh.

It really is like a massively beefed-up editor, but that’s a good thing. And it’s clear from all the editors out there that hardware owners now want that – so they can edit hardware settings more easily, and keep those settings with projects.

Viewed that way, there really is a connection to things like the Model:Samples. Elektron gear, irrespective of price, is now something you can use without having to wrap your head around menus. On the compact, budget gear, that’s because you’ve got all these knobs. But now on the high-end devices, you no longer have to sweat how to connect audio and record ideas or how to get into really customizing these boxes’ sounds.

This is a great trend, I think, because it means you’re no longer restricted to presets when you want to play. You can now assign LFOs and work with samples and parameter automation in a plug-in, or in the standalone software.

And that “oh, maybe I should turn this tweaking into a track” thing — well, that’s easier, too. If you just want to use the standalone software, you can now make multi-track recordings there and leave the DAW until later. If you prefer to work in the DAW, your Elektron box becomes your audio interface and like another plug-in. But then when you want to perform (uh, or stream or whatever it is we do now), you still have everything on the box – only now with easier management of the sounds, parameters, and projects you’ll need to play.

Specs:

VST and AU plug-ins

Visualize the sound design features of your device (modulation, samples, parameters, and so on)

Multichannel USB audio with the Elektron box as your sound card

Use analog instruments (Analog Heat, Analog Rytm, Analog Four) to process digital audio from your computer through their analog circuitry

Management of presets, samples, kits, and projects, including Total Recall inside the DAW

Multiple instrument support, if you own more than one Elektron box

Available now, “free” (well, once you own the hardware, that is!)

https://www.elektron.se/overbridge/

Let us know what you think, and if there’s more you want to know.

The post Elektron’s Overbridge 2 is here, promises to deliver on ambitious machine-computer integration appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

News | Squarepusher Shares Video For ‘Detroit People Mover’ – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 16 Apr 2020 8:00 am
News | Squarepusher Shares Video For 'Detroit People Mover'  The Quietus

News | Gábor Lázár Announces New Album, ‘Source’ – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 16 Apr 2020 8:00 am
News | Gábor Lázár Announces New Album, 'Source'  The Quietus

Features | The Lead Review | Be Inside Your Mind: Shabazz Palaces’ The Don of Diamond Dreams – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 16 Apr 2020 8:00 am
Features | The Lead Review | Be Inside Your Mind: Shabazz Palaces' The Don of Diamond Dreams  The Quietus

Spotify launches Musik Indonesia hub, previously know as Pop Indo – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 16 Apr 2020 8:00 am
Spotify launches Musik Indonesia hub, previously know as Pop Indo  RadioandMusic.com

Court Decision Dismissing Photographer’s Lawsuit Shows Breadth of Rights Granted to Social Media and Denies Infringement Claim for Instagram Embedded Photo

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 16 Apr 2020 4:42 am

In an interesting Court decision from the Southern District of New York, a judge dismissed a lawsuit brought by a photographer for the use of her photo without permission by the website Mashable.  Mashable defended against the claim by arguing that it did not need a license directly from the photographer as it had not posted her photo on its website but had instead embedded that photo using an API from Instagram.  An API allowed the photo to display on the user’s computer with content from the Mashable site, even though the photo was actually coming from Instagram.  Thus, Mashable did not itself host the photo – the photo was hosted and served by Instagram pursuant to the rights that the photographer had granted to Instagram by posting a public photo to that site.  As the Instagram Terms of Use give the company a license to make photos posted on its site available through its API, the Court found that the use of the photo by Mashable was permissible as it had a valid sublicense to use that photo from Instagram through use of the API.  As it had a valid sublicense, it did not need a license directly from the photographer.  The photographer had authorized Instagram to sublicense her photos by agreeing to Instagram’s Terms of Use and not restricting the viewing of that photo to private groups.

This Court’s decision is interesting for two reasons.  First, it seems to contradict a decision about which we wrote here that suggested that the use of an embedded photo was not enough to defeat a claim of liability where the embedded photo was posted on a site to appear to the public to be part of that site.  That other decision focused more on how content appeared to the end-user than it did on the issue of a sublicense as does this case.  Even so, it is likely that there will need to be more litigation and some higher court decisions before there is any final resolution of just how safe it is to embed content from a social media site on your website without permission of the creator of that content.

The other interesting aspect of this case is that it highlights the broad grant of rights that any content creator gives to a social media site on which they post their content.  In my presentations on social media legal issues for broadcasters (see, for instance, my presentation here), I highlight that issue.  By posting content to one of these social media sites, the site’s operator generally has the right to repurpose your content for virtually anything that they want – including sublicensing it to other websites which could be those of your competitors.  Any content producer needs to carefully consider where that content will end up and balance the exposure gained through the distribution offered by the social media platform versus the possible dilution of the value of the producer’s own exploitation of that content.

It will be interesting to watch as this case makes its way through the courts – or as subsequent decisions tackling the same issue are litigated.  For now, what it says is proceed with caution, as the Internet rules of the road are still being written.

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