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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » May » 07


The Reality of Post-Lockdown Clubbing in China

Delivered... whitney | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 5:30 pm

With most of the world practicing social distancing, many of us harbor fantasies about our first post-pandemic raves. We’re up all night celebrating our new liberation, experiencing a 21st century version of the Second Summer of Love. A glance towards China, however, reveals a more subdued return. Starting in March, select clubs across the country have slowly recommenced their operations after a...

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Florian Schneider obituary

Delivered... Adam Sweeting | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 4:24 pm

Co-founder of the pioneering German electronic band Kraftwerk

As one of the chief architects of the electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk, Florian Schneider, who has died of cancer aged 73, helped revolutionise popular music. Where guitars, bass and drums had long been considered its essential building blocks, Kraftwerk paved the way for synth-pop, techno, hip-hop and electronica, in the process proving that microchips and machines could have not only soul, but a sense of humour too. The list of artists whose work is indebted to Kraftwerk, even if they did not always know it, is endless, but includes David Bowie, Depeche Mode, Simple Minds, New Order, The Orb, Madonna, Neil Young, Jay-Z, Afrika Bambaataa, Coldplay and Daft Punk. In 1997 the New York Times described Kraftwerk as “the Beatles of electronic dance music”.

With Schneider and Ralf Hütter proving the main creative impetus, Kraftwerk (German for “power station”) reached their pivotal moment with the release of their fourth album, Autobahn (1974), whose 23-minute title track – a euphoric electronic ode to the joys of driving on Germany’s high-speed motorways, delivered with a light and whimsical touch – became emblematic of the group’s sound and approach. The album reached No 4 in Britain, while the single version of Autobahn reached the the UK Top 20 and the German Top 10. This revolution in synthetic music earned Kraftwerk a spot on BBC television’s science programme Tomorrow’s World in 1975. They subsequently scored a UK chart-topping single, The Model, released with Computer Love (1981), but Kraftwerk’s influence was much further-reaching than mere chart positions would suggest.

Continue reading...

Florian Schneider obituary

Delivered... Adam Sweeting | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 4:24 pm

Co-founder of the pioneering German electronic band Kraftwerk

As one of the chief architects of the electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk, Florian Schneider, who has died of cancer aged 73, helped revolutionise popular music. Where guitars, bass and drums had long been considered its essential building blocks, Kraftwerk paved the way for synth-pop, techno, hip-hop and electronica, in the process proving that microchips and machines could have not only soul, but a sense of humour too. The list of artists whose work is indebted to Kraftwerk, even if they did not always know it, is endless, but includes David Bowie, Depeche Mode, Simple Minds, New Order, The Orb, Madonna, Neil Young, Jay-Z, Afrika Bambaataa, Coldplay and Daft Punk. In 1997 the New York Times described Kraftwerk as “the Beatles of electronic dance music”.

With Schneider and Ralf Hütter proving the main creative impetus, Kraftwerk (German for “power station”) reached their pivotal moment with the release of their fourth album, Autobahn (1974), whose 23-minute title track – a euphoric electronic ode to the joys of driving on Germany’s high-speed motorways, delivered with a light and whimsical touch – became emblematic of the group’s sound and approach. The album reached No 4 in Britain, while the single version of Autobahn reached the the UK Top 20 and the German Top 10. This revolution in synthetic music earned Kraftwerk a spot on BBC television’s science programme Tomorrow’s World in 1975. They subsequently scored a UK chart-topping single, The Model, released with Computer Love (1981), but Kraftwerk’s influence was much further-reaching than mere chart positions would suggest.

Continue reading...

$100,000 Penalty in Consent Decree Shows Teeth in Requirement for Good Faith Negotiation of Retransmission Consent Agreements

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 3:28 pm

The requirement that television broadcasters and MVPDs (including cable and satellite television providers) negotiate in good faith over the provisions of retransmission consent agreements is often cited in arguments by one side or the other when negotiations over the fees to be paid under those agreements break down.  In a consent decree released last week, the FCC showed that the requirement is more than just a few words in the statutes and rules governing these negotiations, reaching an agreement with TV licensee Howard Stirk Holdings, LLC to pay a penalty of $100,000 for violations of those requirements and to also adopt a compliance plan setting up internal corporate controls to ensure that similar violations do not occur in the future.

The consent decree was based on violations described in a decision of the FCC’s Media Bureau released last November (here) finding that 18 television station licensees, operating stations in separate markets, had failed to negotiate retransmission consent in good faith.    The Stirk company and the other stations covered by the November decision had used a single negotiating agent who the Bureau found failed to comply with three of the Commission’s nine “per se” good faith negotiating standards set out in Section 76.65(b)(1) of the Commission’s rules.  Specifically, the Bureau found that the stations had not operated in good faith based on these perceived violations: (1)  refusal to negotiate retransmission consent agreements; (2) refusal to meet and negotiate retransmission consent at reasonable times and locations, or acting in a manner that unreasonably delays retransmission consent negotiations; and (3) failure to respond to a retransmission consent proposal of the other party, including the reasons for the rejection of any such proposal.

In reaching this conclusion, the Bureau pointed to instances where the negotiating agent did not respond to offers for the carriage of single stations in the negotiating group, did not put forward proposals for the carriage of such stations and was slow in responding to proposals put forth by the MVPD and did not respond in detail to those proposals or make meaningful counterproposals.  The Bureau, at the time, ordered the stations to negotiate in good faith and reserved questions of liability, indicating that those could be taken up in the future.  The future appears to be now in last week’s consent decree, as least for the Strik company.

Takeaways for TV stations?  While the FCC will not get into the substance of retransmission consent negotiations (it will not question the economics proposed by either side – see this article from over a dozen years ago where the FCC made that clear), it does require that the parties seriously negotiate over the terms of such carriage.  Parties cannot simply say no and not advance proposals as to what they would accept to resolve the negotiations.  Parties cannot unilaterally cut off negotiations.  And the obligation is one that is unique to each station – so unrelated stations cannot join together and refuse to even consider deals offered for any particular station.  This decision shows that there are real teeth in these regulations – and penalties may follow for violation of the Commission’s standards.

Kraftwerk: their 30 greatest songs, ranked!

Delivered... Dave Simpson | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 3:00 pm

From cycling soundtracks to anti-nuclear protest music, we celebrate the work of the late Florian Schneider and the groundbreaking group he co-founded

Kraftwerk’s first new and original music since 1986, this single started as a commissioned jingle for the Hanover Expo 2000 world’s fair, but returned Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider to the UK Top 30. The trademark mix of subtle techno grooves and melody find them – of course – peering into the 21st century.

Continue reading...

Kraftwerk: their 30 greatest songs, ranked!

Delivered... Dave Simpson | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 3:00 pm

From cycling soundtracks to anti-nuclear protest music, we celebrate the work of the late Florian Schneider and the groundbreaking group he co-founded

Kraftwerk’s first new and original music since 1986, this single started as a commissioned jingle for the Hanover Expo 2000 world’s fair, but returned Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider to the UK Top 30. The trademark mix of subtle techno grooves and melody find them – of course – peering into the 21st century.

Continue reading...

Apple’s sweet spot: which MacBook do you want for music making now?

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 2:31 pm

Every price point in Apple’s notebook lineup has recently gotten an update, with revisions to the 13″ MacBook Pro this week. And they’ve fixed the keyboards. So if you’re in the market for a Mac, which should you get? We know from sales figures that even in the midst of dueling economic and health crises, […]

The post Apple’s sweet spot: which MacBook do you want for music making now? appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

News | Radiohead Continue Archive Series With Bonnaroo 2006 Show – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 8:00 am
News | Radiohead Continue Archive Series With Bonnaroo 2006 Show  The Quietus

Features | Baker’s Dozen | RIP Florian Schneider: A Kraftwerk Baker’s Dozen Special – The Quietus

Delivered... | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 8:00 am
Features | Baker's Dozen | RIP Florian Schneider: A Kraftwerk Baker's Dozen Special  The Quietus
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