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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » August


Ableton Live freebies: bring back the color schemes from Live 2

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 31 Aug 2020 2:04 pm

Party like it's 2002. By popular demand, Sonic Bloom has recreated the "vintage" color skins of Ableton Live 2, 18 years ago.

The post Ableton Live freebies: bring back the color schemes from Live 2 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Ableton Live freebies: Spectral Attractors creates eerie, beautiful sounds

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 31 Aug 2020 12:11 pm

At some point, you don't want another plate reverb. You want the experimental sounds of a phase vocoder combined with a physics model - like in this free Max for Live effect.

The post Ableton Live freebies: Spectral Attractors creates eerie, beautiful sounds appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

This Week in Regulation for Broadcasters: August 22, 2020 to August 28, 2020

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 31 Aug 2020 4:57 am

Here are some of the regulatory and legal developments of the last week of significance to broadcasters, with links to where you can go to find more information as to how they may affect your operations.

  • The FCC this week released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking proposing changes to the fees it charges broadcasters for filing applications like assignments, transfers of control, construction permits, and minor modifications. The new fees are based on the FCC’s attempt to estimate its costs in processing applications, resulting in a proposed increase in some fees and a decrease in others (e.g. an application for a new AM or FM station will be almost $500 cheaper if the FCC’s proposal is adopted, while the filing of a Form 316 short-form assignment or transfer of control application will cost $260 more).  Comments and reply comments on the proposed new application fees will be due 30 days after the Notice is published in the Federal Register, with Reply comments due 45 days from that publication.  (NPRM)
  • The Radio Music License Committee announced a settlement with SESAC on commercial radio music royalties covering the period from January 1, 2019 through the end of 2022. The settlement essentially carries forward the royalties that broadcasters have been paying SESAC for the last three years.  See our Broadcast Law Blog article on the settlement here.  The new blanket agreement is available on the RMLC website here and instructions from SESAC can be found here.
  • The NAB this week hosted a webinar with FCC speakers on the considerations that broadcasters should keep in mind in deciding whether to accept a lump-sum payment for costs that they will incur in making changes to authorized satellite dishes in the C-Band. An election to take a lump-sum payment must be made by September 14 and obligates the broadcaster to assume all future costs of the transition itself.  The decision is not as straightforward as it might seem.  The free webinar can be assessed on the NAB website here.  We wrote about these considerations on our Blog here.
  • Hurricane Laura and Tropical Storm Marco have caused the FCC to activate its Disaster Information Reporting System (DIRS) for dozens of designated counties in nearly 20 states and Washington, DC. The FCC asks communications providers, like TV and radio broadcasters, to voluntary report on the status of their signals and infrastructure to give the FCC a sense of the on-the-ground situation and to help inform its deployment of recovery resources.  As of Friday afternoon, four TV stations, 23 FM stations, and one AM station reported being out of service.  (DIRS Public Notice)  (August 28 DIRS Status Report)
  • We published on the Broadcast Law Blog our look at some of the regulatory dates broadcasters should be aware of in September and early October. The upcoming dates include those for annual regulatory fees, the opening of the lowest unit rate window for advertising by political candidates, the C-Band lump-sum reimbursement election deadline, rulemaking comments, and a plethora of routine regulatory obligations in early October.  (Broadcast Law Blog)

 In the week coming up, keep your eyes open for an FCC decision on the regulatory fees that broadcasters must pay in September.  Look for a decision as to the amount of the fees to be paid by broadcasters (particularly whether there will be any reduction in radio fees as urged by the NAB), and the deadline by which these fees must be paid.

Kelly Lee Owens: Inner Song review – a DJ finds her voice

Delivered... Kitty Empire | Scene | Sun 30 Aug 2020 3:00 pm

(Smalltown Supersound)
The Welsh musician-producer unleashes her own vocals while digging deeper with brooding electronics

Delayed to show “solidarity” with record shops threatened by Covid, Kelly Lee Owens’s second album finds the banging techno DJ venturing further into the realm of electronic pop. The digitals are still on point. Arpeggi’s creepy retro-futurism recalls Boards of Canada and earlier electronic experiments in Germany in the 1970s.

But when Owens was on tour with Four Tet, Kieran Hebden urged her to stop hiding her singing voice under a bushel. Now some actual songs – such as the resolute, sad banger On, or L.I.N.E. (Love Is Not Enough) – find the Welsh musician in full coo. The sweetness is deceptive: L.I.N.E. weighs up the compromises people make in relationships; solitude, she concludes, beats warping your essence.

Related: Kelly Lee Owens: ‘My patients were my career advisers’

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Play what you see: how graphic scores can unleash your inner musical genius

Delivered... Phil Hebblethwaite | Scene | Sun 30 Aug 2020 2:00 pm

When musical notation failed the great avant garde composers, they drew a picture instead. Now, a new project hopes everyone else will follow in their footsteps

Matt Ashdown is determined to make all aspects of music-making open to everyone – composing, recording and performing. Haven’t got an instrument? His Falmouth-based arts organisation, Moogie Wonderland, will help you build a synthesiser on a bread board for less than a tenner. Or you can use one of the “noise stations” that they’ve already assembled and instantly make your live debut – no experience required. At one show in 2017, featuring Damo Suzuki from krautrock group Can, an 11-year-old girl joined in the mayhem. The experience helped to improve her confidence, her dad told Ashdown afterwards. At another gig, led by American electronic musician Simeon Coxe of Silver Apples, Aphex Twin was spotted in the crowd. He made his way to the stage, where, Ashdown recalls, “he bashed a tray hooked up to a fuzz pedal, I think, and came up with some weird guitar effects”.

The joy of graphic notation is that it allows everyone to be a composer

For more details, go to Scores of People.

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THE CREAMFIELDS LIVESTREAM IS THIS WEEKEND!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 28 Aug 2020 9:00 pm
It's called the Creamfields House Party Edition and it happens on Saturday and Sunday. Watch both live stream channels and see the schedule of set times.

THE OUTSIDE LANDS LIVESTREAM IS THIS WEEKEND!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Fri 28 Aug 2020 9:00 pm
It's called Inside Lands and it includes Anderson.Paak, Cage The Elephant, Gorillaz, Jack White, Khruangbin, LCD Soundsystem, Louis The Child, Major Lazer, TOKiMONSTA and more.

Now, I have a refined sense of electronic music: Nipun Divecha – Times of India

Delivered... | Scene | Fri 28 Aug 2020 5:15 pm
Now, I have a refined sense of electronic music: Nipun Divecha  Times of India

Kombé’s “Subsumption Rhythm” Is a Club Track for a Rave in Outerspace

Delivered... ztippitt | Scene | Fri 28 Aug 2020 10:35 am

Sonic Futurism doesn’t locate you in tradition, instead it dislocates you from origins,” writes British-Ghanaian music writer and theorist Kodwo Eshun in his seminal 1998 text, More Brilliant Than The Sun. In it, Eshun takes a bold approach, sampling, remixing and synthesizing language itself in an effort to shape the contours of the sounds that make up “Black Atlantic Futurism.

Source

September Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters: Annual Regulatory Fees, Lowest Unit Rate Window Opening, C-Band Reimbursement, Rulemaking Comments and More

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 5:18 pm

As broadcasters continue to respond to the coronavirus while sometimes juggling work duties with family responsibilities like at-home virtual schooling, it would be easy to overlook regulatory dates and responsibilities.  This post should help alert you to some important dates in September that all stations should keep in mind – and we will also provide a reminder of some of the dates to remember in early October.  As in any year, as summer ends, regulatory activity picks up – and this year appears to be no different.

Each year, in September, regulatory fees are due, as the FCC is required to collect them before the October 1 start of the new fiscal year.  We expect that the final amount of those fees, and the deadlines and procedures for payment, should be announced any day.  For broadcasters, one of the big issues is whether those fees will be adjusted downward from what was initially proposed by the FCC in their Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in this proceeding.  The National Association of Broadcasters has been leading an effort (we wrote about this here and NAB detailed recent meetings between CEO Gordon Smith and members of its legal department with FCC staff here and here) urging the FCC to reduce the amount of fees owed by broadcasters, in part because of the financial toll the pandemic has taken on the industry and in part because the proposed fee structure, which is determined by estimates as to how many FCC staffers are detailed to regulating an industry and the related benefit that industry receives, inaccurately reflects the number of FCC employees who work on radio issues.  Look for that decision very soon.

All commercial broadcasters need to remember that, on September 4, the lowest unit rate period for political candidate advertising— the “political window”—opens for the November 3 general election.  During this 60-day period prior to the general election, legally qualified candidates buying advertising on a broadcast station get the lowest rate for a spot that is then running on the station within the same class of advertising time and in the same daypart.  Candidates also get the benefit of all volume discounts without having to buy in volume – i.e., the candidate gets the same rate for buying one spot as the station’s most favored advertiser gets for buying hundreds of spots of the same class.  Station personnel who deal with political advertisers must understand how to compute lowest unit rate and the many other rules that apply to political broadcasting.  See our post on computing lowest unit rate here and our Political Broadcasting Guide, which covers a range of political broadcasting issues, here.

Broadcast stations that receive satellite-delivered programming are likely affected by the repacking of the C-Band – the swath of spectrum in which much programming is delivered to satellite earth stations.  As part of that band is being repurposed for wireless 5G operations, companies that have dishes using that spectrum will need to be prepared for changes to their facilities – for which they are entitled to reimbursement.  By September 14, parties with eligible earth stations involved in the C-Band transition can elect to receive a lump sum reimbursement payment instead of reimbursement for their relocation costs.  That election will put the burden on the party taking that payment to plan and fund all changes necessary to comply with the new C-Band operating requirements.  We wrote about the considerations in that choice to take a lump sum payment here.

Also in September, parties can comment, on or before September 2, on the Petition for Rulemaking submitted to the FCC by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.  Section 230 gives online platforms legal protections from liability for content that third-party users post on those platforms.  These protections have drawn scrutiny from President Trump, culminating in a late-May Executive Order on Preventing Online Censorship.  As this executive order cannot on its own change current law, the NTIA is asking the FCC to take a new look at Section 230 and ensure the Commission’s interpretation of a law passed in 1996 makes sense in 2020.  After this comment and reply comment period, the FCC would still need to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and accept comments and reply comments before it can take any substantive action.  Reply comments are due on or before September 17.  Read more about this issue and its applicability to broadcast operations here and here.

At their September 29 conference, Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court may well decide whether to review Federal Communications Commission, et al. v. Prometheus Radio Project, et al.  This is the FCC’s appeal of the Third Circuit decision throwing out the FCC’s 2017 order changing many of the broadcast ownership rules – including the abolition of the newspaper-broadcast cross-ownership rule.  Should the Justices decide to take the case, further briefings and oral arguments will be conducted, and a decision could come sometime in 2021.  If not, the Third Circuit decision stands and the FCC will have to evaluate its media ownership rules in line with what the appeals court ordered.  Get caught up with the details of the case, here.

On September 30, the FCC will hold its monthly Open Meeting.  Should there be any broadcast items on the agenda, which should be released during the second week of September, watch the blog for our comments.

As a preview of what is to come in early October, radio stations in Iowa and Missouri and TV stations in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands should be preparing their license renewal applications that are due by October 1, along with the accompanying EEO program report.  Because a license from the FCC is required to operate a broadcast station, filing for renewal of your license is necessary and should be taken seriously.  As part of the preparation of the license renewal application, stations should review their public file to be sure all relevant documents have been uploaded and in a timely manner.  The FCC, as we have written about here and here, will use the tools at its disposal (fines, delayed renewal grants, consent decrees, etc.) to punish stations that have not taken the proper care with their public file.  And recently, the FCC has shown heightened interest in the completeness and timeliness of stations’ political files and has proposed consent decrees with many stations that could not certify on their license renewal application that the political documentation required by FCC rules was placed in the public file at the appropriate times.  We wrote about the first round of these consent decrees, here.  Stations should also be readying to air their post-filing announcements, which for these October 1 renewal stations, begin to air on October 1 and continue through December 16.  Stations are no longer required to air pre-filing announcements.  Click here for more on the license renewal process and to watch a webinar we did on preparing for license renewal.

Also due by October 1 are EEO public inspection file reports for stations that are part of a station employment unit with 5 of more full-time employees in Alaska, Florida, Hawaii, Iowa, Missouri, Oregon, Washington, American Samoa, Guam, the Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  An employment unit is one or more commonly controlled stations in the same geographic area that share at least one employee.  By October 1, these reports are to be uploaded to the station’s FCC-hosted online public file and a link to that report need to be placed on the homepage of the station’s website (if the station has a website).

By October 1, television stations must make their elections as to must-carry or retransmission consent for MVPDs that carry their signals.  Full-power and Class A TV stations must place in their online public inspection file by October 1 notice of whether they elect retransmission consent or must-carry carriage from their area’s MVPDs for the three-year cycle beginning on January 1, 2021.  We summarized this new rule, here.

By October 10, all TV and radio stations must upload to their public file their Quarterly Issues/Programs Lists for the 3rd quarter (July, August, and September).  As a reminder, the Quarterly Issues/Programs Lists are a station’s evidence of how it operated in the public interest, demonstrating its treatment of its community’s most significant issues.  As we have written previously, the FCC takes this requirement seriously and will fine stations, hold up granting license renewals, or both if it finds problems with a station’s compliance.  For a short video on complying with the Quarterly Issues/Programs List requirement, see here.

These are just the highlights of some of the regulatory activity to which broadcasters can look forward in the coming weeks.  Regulatory compliance requires close attention and stations should consult their own attorneys and advisors for more information about these dates and for any other deadlines applicable to their operation.

The Top 7 Mixes of August 2020

Delivered... Caroline Whiteley | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 3:25 pm

Maybe it’s seeing all those awkwardly distanced raves appearing up on the timeline, or maybe we’ve been spending time with more of our friends at once–but is it starting to feel okay to listen to fast and furious mixes again? This month’s selection goes harder than usual, though it’s not without its doomy moments, as Tzusing puts on an apocalypse rave to remember and Angel D’Lite flirts with...

Source

A portrait of Detroit’s Portage Garage Sounds as a community hub for music

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 3:21 pm

Detroit is "not going to go along with what everyone else is doing" - and yes, for all that history, its scene has new artists growing. Here's a look at an essential local label and community hub.

The post A portrait of Detroit’s Portage Garage Sounds as a community hub for music appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Disclosure: Energy review | Alexis Petridis’s album of the week

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 12:00 pm

(Island Records)
With nightclubs closed during coronavirus, the third album from the British pop-house duo has an unwittingly mournful quality

Occasionally, songs take on qualities that their authors never intended them to have. The passage of time casts different light on them; political groups and protest movements co-opt them, lending unanticipated meaning to the words; artists unexpectedly die and their final work becomes freighted with poignancy. To a roll-call that includes Martha and the Vandellas’ Dancing in the Street, John Lennon’s (Just Like) Starting Over, Bob Dylan’s Maggie’s Farm and McFadden & Whitehead’s Ain’t No Stopping Us Now, we now might add, a little unexpectedly, the third album by Surrey-born pop-house duo Disclosure, which events overtook before it was even released.

There may have been less opportune moments in history to put out an album filled with songs hymning the pleasures of clubs, of dancing en masse and of fleeting eyes-meeting-across-the-dancefloor romance, but you struggle to think of one. Energy arrives in a world where most venues are shuttered and festivals cancelled, where dancing with others carries with it the potential of contracting a fatal illness, where illegal raves have become a bigger public bugbear than in the Criminal Justice Act-provoking wake of Castlemorton, and where the dance scene has recently been convulsed by an argument about whether DJs should DJ at all. Online footage of big name DJs playing in continental Europe this month was greeted with general horror, the legal but maskless, non-socially-distanced “plague raves” they were performing at held by some to have contributed to a rise in Covid-19 infections.

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Disclosure: Energy review | Alexis Petridis’s album of the week

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 12:00 pm

(Island Records)
With nightclubs closed during coronavirus, the third album from the British pop-house duo has an unwittingly mournful quality

Occasionally, songs take on qualities that their authors never intended them to have. The passage of time casts different light on them; political groups and protest movements co-opt them, lending unanticipated meaning to the words; artists unexpectedly die and their final work becomes freighted with poignancy. To a roll-call that includes Martha and the Vandellas’ Dancing in the Street, John Lennon’s (Just Like) Starting Over, Bob Dylan’s Maggie’s Farm and McFadden & Whitehead’s Ain’t No Stopping Us Now, we now might add, a little unexpectedly, the third album by Surrey-born pop-house duo Disclosure, which events overtook before it was even released.

There may have been less opportune moments in history to put out an album filled with songs hymning the pleasures of clubs, of dancing en masse and of fleeting eyes-meeting-across-the-dancefloor romance, but you struggle to think of one. Energy arrives in a world where most venues are shuttered and festivals cancelled, where dancing with others carries with it the potential of contracting a fatal illness, where illegal raves have become a bigger public bugbear than in the Criminal Justice Act-provoking wake of Castlemorton, and where the dance scene has recently been convulsed by an argument about whether DJs should DJ at all. Online footage of big name DJs playing in continental Europe this month was greeted with general horror, the legal but maskless, non-socially-distanced “plague raves” they were performing at held by some to have contributed to a rise in Covid-19 infections.

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Spinn & Rashad, Unsound 2011: dancing through a crack in time

Delivered... Jennifer Lucy Allan | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 9:00 am

By playing their ultra-fast footwork style in a Soviet-era Kraków suburb, the Chicago DJs opened a portal to the future

Half an hour from the centre of Kraków, out past the ring road, is the Soviet-era suburb of Nowa Huta, a model city that was never finished. It has roads wide enough for tanks, trees planted with the absorption of a nuclear blast in mind, and it is shaped so that the city can lock down into a fortress in the event of an attack. It is also the location of a vast post-industrial hangar-like theatre space called Łaźnia Nowa, where, one cold Saturday night in early October 2011, a crack in time opened, and the future arrived from Chicago.

With DJ Spinn and DJ Rashad at the controls, this set was one of the first times footwork – the fast ghetto-house dance music from Chicago’s South Side – had been played in Europe. Playing as part of Kraków’s experimental music festival Unsound, they took the roof off the low-ceilinged basement.

Related: Fancy footwork: how Chicago's juke scene found its feet again

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