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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » September » 09


Happy 909 Day! Listen to the songs that came before ‘Energy Flash’

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 9 Sep 2020 11:04 pm

There are few techno tracks as influential as Joey Beltram's "Energy Flash." But it's also a case study in form and influence - one you can learn from. To get started, listen to the tracks that came first.

The post Happy 909 Day! Listen to the songs that came before ‘Energy Flash’ appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

A breakthrough AI-assisted color grading tool emerges from a VJ-Hollywood collaboration

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 9 Sep 2020 6:13 pm

Hollywood-quality color grading is about to get way more accessible, affordable, and automated. It's all thanks to a fresh collaboration between experts in AI and live visual software - and studio colorists. The result promises to be a huge deal for anyone working with color in moving images.

The post A breakthrough AI-assisted color grading tool emerges from a VJ-Hollywood collaboration appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Media Bureau Regulatory Fee Instructions Issued – No Fees for Translator CPs

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 9 Sep 2020 4:16 pm

The Media Bureau yesterday issued its Fact Sheet for the Annual Regulatory Fees for 2020 – expanding on the information available in the various public notices released last week, about which we wrote here.  This Fact Sheet sets out the general information as to how much is owed by various classes of broadcast stations.  The actual fees owed by each station can be determined by entering the station’s call letter or Facility ID Number in the appropriate box on this FCC webpage.  Contact the FCC if you believe that your fee assessment is incorrect.

In addition to the exemption from fees for any entity whose total regulatory obligation is less than $1000, the Fact Sheet also makes clear that FM translators, TV translators and LPTV stations that were not licensed as of October 1, 2019 need not pay a fee.  If, for instance, you received a construction permit for a new FM translator that was not built and licensed until January 2020, then no fee is due. Caution, however, if that station had previously been licensed at a different location (or for LPTV or TV translators, on a different channel), and your construction permit just authorizes a change in an already licensed facility, fees do need to be paid.  Similarly, if a station was licensed on October 1, 2019 and has since been surrendered or cancelled, a fee is still theoretically due.

The amount of the payment due for all stations is based on that station’s licensed facilities as of October 1, 2019 (though, for full-power stations, there are fees for those who hold a construction permit for a new station even if that station has never been licensed).  For full-power stations that received and implemented a power increase after October 1, 2019, fees will still be assessed at the population coverage in 2019 – not the actual service now.  A higher fee will be paid next year, likely in September 2021, based on the status of the station as of October 1 of this year.

So review all of these documents, and prepare your fees for filing by the September 25 deadline (or, for those stations whose service to the public would be imperiled by paying the fee, seek a waiver or deferral of the fees, or an installment payment plan, as explained in another FCC Public notice that we highlighted in our post yesterday).

Silver Apples’ Simeon Coxe: visionary who saw music’s electronic future

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Wed 9 Sep 2020 1:52 pm

In the late 1960s, armed with a homemade synthesiser and pioneering zeal, Coxe made hypnotic sounds that sparked a rock revolution

In the late 1960s, before Tangerine Dream’s Phaedra became the post-hippy stoner’s soundtrack of choice, before Kraftwerk’s Autobahn instilled the idea that pop could be made entirely using electronics in a generation of musicians’ minds, the synthesiser was still an instrument largely associated with novelty albums and classical music: serialist composers including Milton Babbitt were fond of them; the big electronic hit album of the era was Wendy Carlos’s Switched-On Bach, featuring the Brandenburg Concerto and Air On a G String rendered on a Moog.

In the world of rock music, they existed largely as something to embellish the albums of top-flight bands, decorating a couple of tracks on the Beatles’ Abbey Road and Simon and Garfunkel’s Bookends. The rock artists who jumped in feet-first were a peculiar bunch: there was Lothar and the Hand People, a scrappy folk-rock band intent on using a theremin wherever they could; there was the White Noise, refugees from the BBC Radiophonic Workshop whose 1969 album An Electric Storm blended psychedelic whimsy and punishing experimentalism; there was the United States of America, communists who saw their music as a means of politically radicalising an entire country.

Related: Sign up for the Sleeve Notes email: music news, bold reviews and unexpected extras

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Silver Apples synth pioneer Simeon Coxe dies aged 82

Delivered... Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 9 Sep 2020 9:34 am

Electronic innovator jammed with Hendrix, inspired bands from Portishead to Stereolab and drove an ice-cream truck before becoming a cult sensation

Simeon Coxe, co-founder of the pioneering 1960s experimental electronic band Silver Apples, has died aged 82. He had a progressive lung condition, pulmonary fibrosis.

In the late 60s, Coxe introduced a 1940s audio oscillator into his group, the Overland Stage Electric Band. “Besides the drummer Danny [Taylor] who later joined me, no one in the band was amused,” he said in 2012. The change in direction prompted the departure of his band members until only he and Taylor remained. They changed the band’s name to Silver Apples and established their pioneering, proto-synthesiser setup: nine audio oscillators and 96 manual controllers – pieced together in part from discarded second world war equipment, Coxe once said – fondly known as “the Simeon”.

Related: The great 60s electro-pop plane crash: how pioneers Silver Apples fell out of the sky

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