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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2020 » December


‘All that mattered was survival’: the songs that got us through 2020

Delivered... Guardian music | Scene | Thu 31 Dec 2020 11:00 am

Butterflies with Mariah, Bronski Beat in the Peak District, Snoop Dogg on a food delivery ad … our writers reveal the tracks that made 2020 bearable

When it came to lockdown comfort listening, there was something particularly appealing about lush symphonic soul made by artists such as Teddy Pendergrass and the Delfonics. But there was one record I reached for repeatedly: Black Moses by Isaac Hayes, and particularly the tracks arranged by Dale Warren. Their version of Burt Bacharach’s (They Long to Be) Close to You is an epic, spinning the original classic into a nine-minute dose of saccharine soul. But their cover of Going in Circles, another Warren exercise in expansion, is their masterpiece, reimagining the Friends of Distinction original as a seven-minute arrangement with stirring strings and beatific backing vocals that builds into a story about lost love that transcends the genre’s usual parameters. A perfect, if slightly meta, balm for the repetitive lockdown blues. Lanre Bakare

Related: AG Cook: the nutty producer behind the decade's most divisive music

Continue reading...

‘All that mattered was survival’: the songs that got us through 2020

Delivered... Guardian music | Scene | Thu 31 Dec 2020 11:00 am

Butterflies with Mariah, Bronski Beat in the Peak District, Snoop Dogg on a food delivery ad … our writers reveal the tracks that made 2020 bearable

When it came to lockdown comfort listening, there was something particularly appealing about lush symphonic soul made by artists such as Teddy Pendergrass and the Delfonics. But there was one record I reached for repeatedly: Black Moses by Isaac Hayes, and particularly the tracks arranged by Dale Warren. Their version of Burt Bacharach’s (They Long to Be) Close to You is an epic, spinning the original classic into a nine-minute dose of saccharine soul. But their cover of Going in Circles, another Warren exercise in expansion, is their masterpiece, reimagining the Friends of Distinction original as a seven-minute arrangement with stirring strings and beatific backing vocals that builds into a story about lost love that transcends the genre’s usual parameters. A perfect, if slightly meta, balm for the repetitive lockdown blues. Lanre Bakare

Related: AG Cook: the nutty producer behind the decade's most divisive music

Continue reading...

Perko B2Beats P Relief: Ringing in the New Year

Delivered... whitney | Scene | Thu 31 Dec 2020 9:05 am

LIRA-8 reimagines the LYRA-8 organismic drone synth in Pd, VST, AU free – donationware

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 30 Dec 2020 11:24 pm

The wonderfully mysterious analog LYRA-8 synthesizer world now has an unofficial digital cousin - and it's free-or-pay-what-you-can for Pure Data (and cross-platform AU and VST).

The post LIRA-8 reimagines the LYRA-8 organismic drone synth in Pd, VST, AU free – donationware appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Darkness, mixed: sonic reflections for Threads*Palestine

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 30 Dec 2020 6:40 pm

In dark moments, sometimes the most vital gesture is acknowledging uncertainty and feeling. So as we pass the milestone of one year into the next, I'll be talking through some mixes alongside our year-end music review.

The post Darkness, mixed: sonic reflections for Threads*Palestine appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

More FTC Consent Decrees Emphasize Prohibitions on Advertising of Unproven Health Benefits of CBD Products

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 30 Dec 2020 5:35 pm

Just before Christmas, the Federal Trade Commission issued consent decrees with six companies resolving proceedings alleging that their marketing of CBD products was deceptive.  The consent decrees included monetary penalties as high as $80,000 and compliance plans to ensure that the named companies would not engage in future marketing of unproven health benefits of CBD products.  The FTC issued a press release on the consent decrees (links to the decrees and related documents can be found on the same webpage as the press release).

Some of the health claims that the FTC found problematic were very specific, suggesting that CBD could aid in the treatment of specific diseases and medical conditions.  Other claims found to be improper included more general claims that CBD was effective for “pain relief” and that the products are safe for all users.  As noted in the FTC documents, only proven health claims for CBD can be included in marketing material – and so far, the proven health benefits have been limited to those provided by specific FDA-approved anti-seizure medications.  While these decrees were with companies selling CBD products, rather than media companies that ran their ads, as we have noted before, broadcasters and other media companies should be alert to advertising messages that exceed permissible guidelines.  While the FDA has promised further guidance on the sale and marketing of CBD products, action has likely been stalled by the agency’s concentration on pandemic-related issues. 

This month’s decrees are not the first federal government actions to target the marketing of CBD products.   We have written before (see, for instance, our articles here and here) about actions by both the FTC and the FDA that target companies selling CBD products, not only for the types of deceptive health claims involved in these cases, but also in connection with any CBD product that is marketed for ingestion as a food additive or dietary supplement.  As we noted, hemp-based CBD is no longer a Schedule I drug that is banned by federal law for all uses in the US (contrast this with marijuana, which we have suggested that media companies not advertise at all given its continued illegality under federal law).  Instead, CBD can now be legally produced and distributed in many states that have implemented regulatory controls required by the 2014 and 2018 Farm Acts.  But companies looking to advertise these products need to observe the restrictions on health claims that these recent decisions found problematic, as well as the restrictions on ingestible products cited in past regulatory actions, and any other restrictions imposed by law and regulation – including state laws that may limit the distribution and marketing of these products.  Given the uncertainties that surround CBD advertising, stations should consult with counsel before accepting such ads.

Year in Review: What It Feels Like to Die

Delivered... whitney | Scene | Wed 30 Dec 2020 11:50 am

Ansh Pandit, An Influencer & Digital Creator is taking his Instagram reels to another level – News Track English

Delivered... | Scene | Wed 30 Dec 2020 9:00 am
Ansh Pandit, An Influencer & Digital Creator is taking his Instagram reels to another level  News Track English

January Regulatory Dates for Broadcasters – A New FCC Administration, Quarterly Issues Programs Lists, KidVid, Comment Deadlines and a Supreme Court Oral Argument on Ownership Issues

Delivered... David Oxenford and Adam Sandler | Scene | Tue 29 Dec 2020 3:58 pm

The holiday season is nearly behind us and many are looking forward to putting 2020 in the rearview mirror with a hopeful eye on 2021.  The new year will bring big changes to the Washington broadcast regulation scene, with the inauguration of a new President and installation of a new FCC chair who will make an imprint on the agency with his or her own priorities.  And routine regulatory dates and deadlines will continue to fill up a broadcaster’s calendar.  So let’s look at what to expect in the world of Washington regulation in the coming month.

On the routine regulatory front, on or before January 10, all full-power broadcast stations, commercial and noncommercial, must upload to their online public inspection files their Quarterly Issues Programs lists, listing the most important issues facing their communities in the last quarter of 2020 and the programs that they broadcast in October, November and December that addressed those issues.  As we have written before, these lists are the only documents required by the FCC to demonstrate how stations served the needs and interests of their broadcast service area, and they are particularly important as the FCC continues its license renewal process for radio and TV stations.  Make sure that you upload these lists to your public file by the January 10 deadline.  You can find a short video on complying with the Quarterly Issues/Programs List requirements here.

Television stations should also be preparing their annual Children’s Television Programming Report (Form 2100, Schedule H – formerly Form 398) and certification of compliance with commercial limits in their children’s programming.  The Form 398 would normally be due to be filed at the FCC on January 30 but, as that date falls on a Saturday, the FCC filing deadline this year is February 1, the next business day.  This is the first time that stations will file a KidVid report covering an entire year and not just one quarter.  We summarized the 2019 KidVid rule changes, here.  FCC rules also require that stations place in their public files by January 30 of each year records documenting compliance with the limits on the number of commercial minutes that stations can allow in children’s programming.

Reply comments are due in two proceedings that will affect broadcasters.  Interested parties have until January 25 to submit reply comments in the FCC’s foreign entity sponsorship identification proceeding.  This proceeding seeks to enhance and standardize the on-air disclosure that broadcasters must make when programming is supplied or paid for by a foreign entity or its representatives.

Also due that same day are reply comments on the petition by the National Association of Broadcasters to clarify who is legally responsible for the programming on a subchannel of one TV station when that programming is a simulcast of another station’s programming.  This would include when the subchannel is acting as the required ATSC 1.0 “lighthouse” signal for the primary video stream of a station that has converted to ATSC 3.0 (Next Gen TV) operations.  The NAB suggests that the originating station, rather than the host station, should be liable for the public service, political broadcasting, public file and other legal obligations that arise from that programming.  We wrote about the issues posed in this proceeding in more detail, here.

For those interested in potential changes in the FCC’s ownership rules, you will want to listen to the oral argument before the Supreme Court on the appeal of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals’ rejection of the FCC’s 2017 media ownership rule changes that, among other things, eliminated the Newspaper/Broadcast Cross-Ownership Rule.  That argument will be held on January 19 and can be heard live on C-SPAN.  An audio recording and transcript of the argument should be posted to the Court’s website by January 22.  A decision in the case is expected later in the year, and the argument may give some preview of the Court’s thinking.  We wrote about this case and media ownership issues more generally, here.

The FCC will hold its first of its required monthly open meetings of 2021 on January 13.  The tentative agenda indicates that Chairman Pai will not tee up any items for a vote and will instead use the meeting to allow bureau and office leaders to highlight their accomplishments over the last four years.  This meeting will be Chairman Pai’s last Open Meeting at the agency and Commissioner Nathan Simington’s first meeting, having joined the Commission on December 14, 2020. A week later, President-Elect Joe Biden will be sworn in on January 20.  With Chairman Pai’s planned January 20 departure from the agency, each party will hold two seats (Rosenworcel (D), Starks (D), Carr (R), and Simington (R)), making action on any partisan items all but impossible until a third Democratic Commissioner is installed.  We will be watching to see the naming of an interim chair of the FCC, and for when a nominee for the open seat will be announced by the new President – and how quickly the Senate will act on that nominee.

And, looking ahead to February, television and radio stations in several states must file applications for license renewal and file and upload EEO reports.  By February 1, TV stations in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi and radio stations in Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma must file their license renewal applications through the FCC’s Licensing and Management System (LMS).  Those stations must also file with the FCC a Broadcast EEO Program Report (Form 396) and, if they are part of an employment unit with 5 or more full-time employees, upload to their public file and post a link on their station website to their Annual EEO Public Inspection File report covering their hiring and employment outreach activities that occurred in the period from February 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021.  TV and radio stations licensed to communities in New Jersey and New York also must meet their Annual EEO Public Inspection file report obligations on February 1.

As always, consult with your own attorneys and advisors to make sure that there are no other regulatory obligations for your stations that fall in the coming month.  As 2020 comes to a close, we thank you for your readership and join you in looking forward to a successful 2021 for your stations and the broadcast industry.

Musician, heal thyself: how ambient music brought solace in 2020

Delivered... Kate Hutchinson | Scene | Tue 29 Dec 2020 3:00 pm

With no clubs or gigs to go to and pandemic anxiety to quell, ambient music chimed more strongly in a year when artists reconsidered their sense of purpose

“A balm to your soul” – so went the Observer review of Julianna Barwick’s album this July, which was inspired by the musician’s move from New York City to the wellbeing mecca of Los Angeles. Her one-woman choir of celestial vocals is as calming as the bit at the end of a yoga class where you get to shut your eyes and lie under a blanket, and the album, along with its title Healing Is a Miracle, had extra resonance in 2020. Music is so often a communal experience, but with those possibilities snatched away this year, many of us have looked to sounds like this to soothe us where human connection couldn’t. Another reviewer agreed, writing that Barwick’s new music was “a salve for the collective wound”.

Barwick wasn’t the only one. Earlier this year, I interviewed a collection of musicians, including the pop performer Robyn, about the music of Beverly Glenn-Copeland, a cult Canadian musician whose spirited, otherworldly incantations are only just reaching new audiences, decades after they were first released. A retrospective of Glenn-Copeland’s music, Transmissions, came out last month, and Robyn noted the particular reassuring quality of his songs, especially on his New Age lost treasure Keyboard Fantasies: “It’s the purpose of his music,” she had said. “We all need to release, feel and heal, and Glenn helps us to do that through his own experiences.”

Soundscapes spoke to the claustrophobia and drift of isolation … ethereal singing suggested possibility in some untethered parallel universe

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Essential games for music nerds from the Steam Winter Sale

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 28 Dec 2020 10:08 pm

2020 saw the gaming industry supplant film as the predominant AV medium. There are plenty of great possibilities for immersion now on sale for Mac and PC - and titles music makers and nerds won't want to miss. Here are some favorites, including some that might fly under the radar.

The post Essential games for music nerds from the Steam Winter Sale appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Top 7 Mixes of 2020

Delivered... Caroline Whiteley | Scene | Mon 28 Dec 2020 7:00 am

Texture is a free, rich granular reverb plug-in with mid/side for Mac, Windows

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 25 Dec 2020 1:36 pm

You deserve some instant ambience - ready to pour over your sounds like so much maple syrup. Hell, yeah - and download this now, as it's free only in December.

The post Texture is a free, rich granular reverb plug-in with mid/side for Mac, Windows appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Xmas up your Ableton Live with these free themes and chime-y sample pack

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 25 Dec 2020 1:13 pm

Go bright and daring with Ableton Live color schemes - including one very green option - and load up with some samples from a Christmas ornament. It can be festive, or it can be ... something else entirely.

The post Xmas up your Ableton Live with these free themes and chime-y sample pack appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Year in Review: Trekking Through the Uncanny Valley of DJ Live Streams

Delivered... ztippitt | Scene | Fri 25 Dec 2020 9:00 am
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