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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2021 » February » 16


Beads is the new sequel to Mutable Instruments’ Clouds, and an instant classic – again

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 16 Feb 2021 7:11 pm

Mutable Instruments' Clouds defined granular instruments even beyond the modular world. Beads - making a surprise debut today - is a brilliant-looking follow-up, retaining the design but improving almost every element.

The post Beads is the new sequel to Mutable Instruments’ Clouds, and an instant classic – again appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

No Class C4 FM To Be Permitted By Waiver – Where Things Stand on Proposal for New Class of FM Stations

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 16 Feb 2021 6:10 pm

At the end of last week, the FCC’s Audio Division released a letter decision denying a Class A FM station licensee (limited in power to 6 KW) a waiver that would have allowed it to upgrade its facilities to those that would be equivalent to what would be permitted if the Commission was to establish a Class C4 FM.  The Division found that granting such a waiver would prejudge the FCC’s pending proceeding looking at whether the FCC should approve Class C4 stations.  Where does that proceeding stand?

The pending proposal to create a Class C4 FM station, i.e., one operating with maximum effective radiated power of 12 kw (essentially midway between the power limits of the current Class A stations and Class C3 FMs that are limited to 25 kw), has been advocated at the FCC for several years.  Sponsors contend that it would allow Class A stations to not only solidify and expand their coverage, but also to overcome some of the building penetration issues that are alleged to occur when reception is limited inside buildings constructed of certain materials.  The proposal for this new class of FM station has not been unanimously supported by other broadcasters.

Opposing broadcasters fear more stations will clutter the FM band and potentially knock existing FM translators off the air or preclude new translators for both AM and FM stations.  Also, the C4 proposal suggests that certain FM stations that are not operating at their full facilities for the class for which they are licensed should be protected only to their actual contours if they were not ready to commit, upon notice, to upgrading their facilities.  Many broadcasters feared that this would unduly limit future changes to the facilities of their stations.

Because of the conflicting opinions of broadcasters, the FCC did not issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking suggesting a set of rules for implementing the Class C4 service.  Instead, the FCC only issued a Notice of Inquiry – asking a series of questions about whether they should move forward with the proposal (see our article here).  Thus, before the Class C4 FM proposal could be adopted, the FCC would have to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking setting out more definitive proposed rules for the new class of stations.  Public comment on that proposal would have to be received before any final decision could be made.

So, any conclusion on Class C4 stations is quite some time in the future.  Last week’s decision seems to recognize that the FCC is not ready to decide the C4 question soon.  Thus, until a decision is made, broadcasters interested in these upgraded facilities will have to be patient.

Save and rave! How a compilation of pirate radio adverts captures a lost Britain

Delivered... Simon Reynolds | Scene | Tue 16 Feb 2021 10:48 am

Fashion boutiques, shop-fitters and others advertised alongside raves on early 1990s pirate radio. Now, a new compilation is rediscovering a slice of the underground

“Have you got that record that goes ah-woo-ooo-ooh-yeah-yeah?” It’s a scene familiar to anyone who spent time in a hardcore rave record shop in the 1990s – a punter asking for a tune they’ve heard on pirate radio or at a rave but they don’t know the title of, so they mimic the riff or sample hook hoping someone behind the counter recognises it.

A relic of pre-Shazam life, the ritual is preserved in an advert for Music Power Records aired on the pirate station Pulse FM in 1992. Nick Power, owner of the north London shop, recalls that no matter how mangled the customer’s rendition, “nearly always, you’d be able to identify the exact record they were looking for”. In the advert, Power plays the roles of both sales assistant and punter, pinching his nose to alter his voice. Almost 40 years later, the comic skit commercial has been resurrected alongside others on two volumes of London Pirate Radio Adverts 1984-1993, by audio archivist Luke Owen. Power is pleasantly bemused by this turn of events: “I can’t see there’d be a demand for radio ads, but there’s got to be someone out there who’s interested enough to buy it. I don’t see it being a platinum release, though!”

Continue reading...

Save and rave! How a compilation of pirate radio adverts captures a lost Britain

Delivered... Simon Reynolds | Scene | Tue 16 Feb 2021 10:48 am

Fashion boutiques, shop-fitters and others advertised alongside raves on early 1990s pirate radio. Now, a new compilation is rediscovering a slice of the underground

“Have you got that record that goes ah-woo-ooo-ooh-yeah-yeah?” It’s a scene familiar to anyone who spent time in a hardcore rave record shop in the 1990s – a punter asking for a tune they’ve heard on pirate radio or at a rave but they don’t know the title of, so they mimic the riff or sample hook hoping someone behind the counter recognises it.

A relic of pre-Shazam life, the ritual is preserved in an advert for Music Power Records aired on the pirate station Pulse FM in 1992. Nick Power, owner of the north London shop, recalls that no matter how mangled the customer’s rendition, “nearly always, you’d be able to identify the exact record they were looking for”. In the advert, Power plays the roles of both sales assistant and punter, pinching his nose to alter his voice. Almost 40 years later, the comic skit commercial has been resurrected alongside others on two volumes of London Pirate Radio Adverts 1984-1993, by audio archivist Luke Owen. Power is pleasantly bemused by this turn of events: “I can’t see there’d be a demand for radio ads, but there’s got to be someone out there who’s interested enough to buy it. I don’t see it being a platinum release, though!”

Continue reading...
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