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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Bella Todd


Tim Hecker: ‘I make pagan music that dances on the ashes of a burnt church’

Delivered... Bella Todd | Scene | Tue 5 Apr 2016 9:00 am

He lost his religion, but this electronic artist is fascinated by the transcendent tropes of sacred music. Now he’s using it to explore new frontiers – and creep you out on the way

In the white-stuccoed nave of St Martin-In-The-Fields, cloistered from the late afternoon traffic of Trafalgar Square, a choir is performing one of the canticles of Evensong. Their voices meld and magnify in mid-air. Across the church, heads bow and eyes close – except those of a dark-haired man in jeans and a black bomber jacket, who Instagrams the altar window, drums his fingers on a prayer book and, finally, grips the pew in front as if he’s bracing against a storm. His mind, he’ll later tell me, is “swimming on a whole bunch of powerful things”. Tim Hecker, it seems, just doesn’t do quiet contemplation.

A Canadian electronic artist recently signed to indie label 4AD, Hecker is in the business of making experimental music for the unconverted. Love Streams, his new album of beat-free, long-form compositions, is complex, evocative, arrestingly beautiful and disquietingly intense. It’s also built around the pillaged scores of 15th-century sacred choral music – hence the Guide inviting him back to church for the first time since he was 14.

Related: Unsound Adelaide: Tim Hecker and Daniel Lopatin; Robin Fox; Raime; Trinity

Related: No Bieber? No problem! How Oneohtrix Point Never made a pop album without the pop stars

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Tim Hecker: ‘I make pagan music that dances on the ashes of a burnt church’

Delivered... Bella Todd | Scene | Tue 5 Apr 2016 9:00 am

He lost his religion, but this electronic artist is fascinated by the transcendent tropes of sacred music. Now he’s using it to explore new frontiers – and creep you out on the way

In the white-stuccoed nave of St Martin-In-The-Fields, cloistered from the late afternoon traffic of Trafalgar Square, a choir is performing one of the canticles of Evensong. Their voices meld and magnify in mid-air. Across the church, heads bow and eyes close – except those of a dark-haired man in jeans and a black bomber jacket, who Instagrams the altar window, drums his fingers on a prayer book and, finally, grips the pew in front as if he’s bracing against a storm. His mind, he’ll later tell me, is “swimming on a whole bunch of powerful things”. Tim Hecker, it seems, just doesn’t do quiet contemplation.

A Canadian electronic artist recently signed to indie label 4AD, Hecker is in the business of making experimental music for the unconverted. Love Streams, his new album of beat-free, long-form compositions, is complex, evocative, arrestingly beautiful and disquietingly intense. It’s also built around the pillaged scores of 15th-century sacred choral music – hence the Guide inviting him back to church for the first time since he was 14.

Related: Unsound Adelaide: Tim Hecker and Daniel Lopatin; Robin Fox; Raime; Trinity

Related: No Bieber? No problem! How Oneohtrix Point Never made a pop album without the pop stars

Continue reading...

Petite Noir: ‘Nowhere really feels like home’

Delivered... Bella Todd | Scene | Sat 31 Jan 2015 9:30 am

From Camden by way of Congo and Cape Town the musician is following in Spoek Mathambo’s footsteps with his dark mix of 80s electro and African styles, shaped by alienation, exile and a friendship with Mos Def

Petite Noir is remembering the moment he had to choose between pop music and God. Well, kind of. Then still in his teens, and known as Yannick Ilunga, the South African musician met township tech star Spoek Mathambo at a Cape Town club. “Spoek called and asked if I wanted to record some guitar for him,” he says. “But I had church band practice the same day. So I told my worship leader I wanted to go to the studio, and she said, ‘If you leave the church for this, you never gonna come back.’”

You can guess which way he plumped by the fact that Petite Noir is now signed to Domino subsidiary Double Six (“for a crazy sum”) and is about to release a compelling debut EP. God, the 24-year-old likes to think, stuck with him anyway. But the intervening half-decade has involved a serious innocence-to-experience-style journey. “Back then I was hardly even drinking,” he says. “Now I’ve seen so much, so much, so much…” Petite Noir, as you’ll gather, can in conversation be as nebulous as his bespoke tees and baseball caps are sharp. At times he seems less to be responding to questions, more freestyling languorously over his own private beat.

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