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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Kate Hennessy


Music you missed: 10 Australian underground releases from Cable Ties to Au.Ra

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Sun 16 Jul 2017 12:50 am

Our quarterly music column returns to dig up the best releases you may not have heard in the past three months

Despite my lack of interest in theming this column, a theme has bubbled up. Half the acts listed here are living overseas.

It could be because Australia is a tough country to live in as an artist. That notion has floated about for ages and was finally anchored last year when a survey pointed to serious health and wellbeing problems in an entertainment industry in “severe distress”. Living in cheaper cities with less distance between gigs, and a larger audience for niche scenes, is one way to relieve that distress.

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Music you missed: 10 Australian underground releases from Cable Ties to Au.Ra

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Sun 16 Jul 2017 12:50 am

Our quarterly music column returns to dig up the best releases you may not have heard in the past three months

Despite my lack of interest in theming this column, a theme has bubbled up. Half the acts listed here are living overseas.

It could be because Australia is a tough country to live in as an artist. That notion has floated about for ages and was finally anchored last year when a survey pointed to serious health and wellbeing problems in an entertainment industry in “severe distress”. Living in cheaper cities with less distance between gigs, and a larger audience for niche scenes, is one way to relieve that distress.

Continue reading...

Music you missed: 10 Australian underground releases from Cable Ties to Au.Ra

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Sun 16 Jul 2017 12:50 am

Our quarterly music column returns to dig up the best releases you may not have heard in the past three months

Despite my lack of interest in theming this column, a theme has bubbled up. Half the acts listed here are living overseas.

It could be because Australia is a tough country to live in as an artist. That notion has floated about for ages and was finally anchored last year when a survey pointed to serious health and wellbeing problems in an entertainment industry in “severe distress”. Living in cheaper cities with less distance between gigs, and a larger audience for niche scenes, is one way to relieve that distress.

Continue reading...

Music You Missed: the best Australian underground releases from RVG to Nadia Reid

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Thu 13 Apr 2017 2:12 am

Our quarterly music column returns to dig up the best releases you may not have heard in the past three months

Last weekend in Melbourne, and the week before in Brisbane, A Rock & Roll Writers Festival returned for a second year to put songwriters, music critics and novelists on stage to discuss their craft. Speakers included Adalita, Bunna Lawrie, Tim Rogers, Jess Ribeiro and Jenny Valentish. I took part in a panel with three other music critics.

The festival claims to “celebrate the creative relationship between writing and music”, though it does much more. First, it asserts that contemporary music, writing and the confluence of the two actually matter in Australian culture. That alone slakes a terrible thirst. Second, it asks why they matter and how.

Related: Underworld review – born-again dance legends show no sign of slipping

Related: Mogwai, Ulver and 500 litres of blood headed to Tasmania in June as Dark Mofo returns

Related: Al Grigg from Red Riders: 'Where in Sydney can you make a whole bunch of noise these days?'

Related: 'I'm like a secret assassin': Poo Bear on writing for Justin Bieber, Skrillex and Sam Smith

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Music you missed: 10 Australian underground releases from Peep Tempel to Corin

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Thu 5 Jan 2017 4:44 am

Our quarterly music column returns to dig up the best under-the-radar Australian releases from the end of 2016

These nine albums share something. A line from Anthrocene on Nick Cave’s record Skeleton Tree kept coming to me as I wrote this column: “Animals pull the night around their shoulders.”

These are albums you can pull around your shoulders. None have singles that tower above the rest but each has succeeded in making and maintaining a distinct universe; a space you can – or must – enter into and exist in for the duration of the album.

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Walking on a Dream redux: Empire of the Sun on the ad that changed their lives

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Tue 25 Oct 2016 8:21 pm

With an eight-year-old single revived and a new album, the Australian electronic duo are being rewarded for positive thoughts

On YouTube, views of the Honda Civic advertisement first televised in January are ticking towards 200,000. “Song iz awesome,” reads one comment. “Hey what is that song called and who is it by I like that song,” reads another.

A commercially placed song, known as a “sync”, is an increasingly legitimate way for musicians to make a buck in an industry where sources of cold hard cash, at least for artists, is scarcer than ever. The success of the Honda sync was surprising though because the track that so enraptured viewers was Walking on a Dream by Australian pop duo Empire of the Sun, and it is eight years old.

Related: Empire of the Sun: Ice on the Dune – review

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Music you missed: from Rebel Yell to Jordan Ireland’s mysterious solo album

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Tue 11 Oct 2016 8:03 am

Ten of the best Australian LPs, side projects and underground releases that might have passed you by in July, August and September

Are Australian solo artists making the best music in 2016? With seven solo musicians and one duo listed here, I could certainly argue the case. That said, solo artists have always dominated my music collection; they are less swayed by prevailing trends and their music ages better.

Over the past year it’s become clear that women are making the most interesting and idiosyncratic club music. Holy Balm and Elisabeth Dixon have great new albums, Chiara Kickdrum is featured on the Domestic Documents series of local “electronic abstraction”, and the live sets I’ve seen recently from LA Suffocated, WDK, Lucy Cliché and Workshop have been truly excellent too.

Related: Music you missed: 10 Australian underground releases from Deep Heat to Dispossessed

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Music You Missed: 10 essential releases from the Australian underground

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Fri 1 Apr 2016 5:28 am

Our first of a quarterly music column looks at No Zu’s disco jams, Gentleforce’s meditation on depression and other Australian albums that deserved more love

Victoria’s Golden Plains festival celebrated its 10th anniversary in March. The line-up featured Sleater-Kinney, the Buzzcocks and Violent Femmes but it was Australian acts Royal Headache, No Zu, the Necks and Black Cab that thrust enthusiasm into ecstasy.

After six years off, garage rockers Eddy Current Suppression Ring were especially transcendent – oh, the power and the glory! The night air in the amphitheatre was startled, then electric. Looking out at the heave of flesh and flash of sweat, singer Brendan Huntley seemed in a daze of disbelief too.

Related: Sydney lockouts: seven creatives give their views – and none of them are good

Related: Unsound Adelaide review – breaking ground with unorthodox live sounds

Continue reading...

Music You Missed: 10 essential releases from the Australian underground

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Fri 1 Apr 2016 5:28 am

Our first of a quarterly music column looks at No Zu’s disco jams, Gentleforce’s meditation on depression and other Australian albums that deserved more love

Victoria’s Golden Plains festival celebrated its 10th anniversary in March. The line-up featured Sleater-Kinney, the Buzzcocks and Violent Femmes but it was Australian acts Royal Headache, No Zu, the Necks and Black Cab that thrust enthusiasm into ecstasy.

After six years off, garage rockers Eddy Current Suppression Ring were especially transcendent – oh, the power and the glory! The night air in the amphitheatre was startled, then electric. Looking out at the heave of flesh and flash of sweat, singer Brendan Huntley seemed in a daze of disbelief too.

Related: Sydney lockouts: seven creatives give their views – and none of them are good

Related: Unsound Adelaide review – breaking ground with unorthodox live sounds

Continue reading...

Unsound Adelaide review – breaking ground with unorthodox live sounds

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Mon 29 Feb 2016 5:18 am

Thebarton Theatre, Adelaide Festival
Babyfather, Tralala Blip and Jlin use beauty, stealth and force to convert audiences to unfamiliar sounds

Some say the music of Unsound is “difficult”. But difficult to one is eyes-closed, body-slumped bliss to another. The phrase “boundary-pushing” is problematic too because boundaries are only pushed if you’ve already got them drawn.

The Unsound faithful – me included – rarely do. Our taste isn’t shoehorned into closed ideas of what we like or don’t like but defined by an open-mindedness that requests one thing: be interesting. Play me something I haven’t heard or take me somewhere I’ve haven’t been. Embody the essence of something or its genesis. Convince me by stealth or by force, by brutality or brains.

Related: Everything happens in Adelaide in March – our picks of the festival

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Lawrence English: our relationship with sound is problematic

Delivered... Kate Hennessy | Scene | Thu 30 Jul 2015 6:24 am

The founder of record label Room40 discusses the complexities of sound, Brisbane’s creative exodus and music that makes him uncomfortable

When a rat runs over Lawrence English’s foot, it’s a shock to both of us. For English, because the rat is “the size of a small cat”. For me, because I’m returned to a here and now our conversation has seen me slip from.

“I’m interested in the idea of the body as an ear,” English continues. “I want to explore the point at which our audition becomes synesthetic.”

Related: New band of the day – No 884: William Basinski

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