Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com


The Human League may jump back into the top 10 … thanks to Aberdeen FC

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Thu 20 Mar 2014 5:58 pm

Facebook campaign by football fans could give the synth-pop band its first top-10 appearance since 1995

The Human League look set to have a top 10 single in the UK thanks to some unlikely help from Scottish football.

Don't You Want Me may return to the top 10, more than 30 years since it became a hit for the synth-pop group. The track is a favourite among Aberdeen FC fans, and supporters started a social media campaign to boost its sales following the club's victory in the Scottish League Cup on 16 March.

Sadly for supporters, although maybe not for music itself, the version charting will merely be the original, rather than a re-recorded version that incorporates the popular fan chant "Peter Pawlett, baby". The subject of the song remains a waitress working at a cocktail bar, rather than the talismanic midfielder who has scored six goals in his 93 appearances for the club.

Richard Albiston, who founded the Facebook campaign, seemed happy to have any version making the charts: "The page was set up as a bit of fun. I never expected it to take off as much as it has."

Don't You Want Me is the UK's 24th biggest-selling single of all time. It is currently placed at No 12, but has been rising sharply. If it makes the top 10, it will be the band's first appearance there since Tell Me When peaked at No 6 in January 1995. It is currently climbing the iTunes top 10 singles chart.


theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

The Human League may jump back into the top 10 … thanks to Aberdeen FC

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Thu 20 Mar 2014 5:58 pm

Facebook campaign by football fans could give the synth-pop band its first top-10 appearance since 1995

The Human League look set to have a top 10 single in the UK thanks to some unlikely help from Scottish football.

Don't You Want Me may return to the top 10, more than 30 years since it became a hit for the synth-pop group. The track is a favourite among Aberdeen FC fans, and supporters started a social media campaign to boost its sales following the club's victory in the Scottish League Cup on 16 March.

Sadly for supporters, although maybe not for music itself, the version charting will merely be the original, rather than a re-recorded version that incorporates the popular fan chant "Peter Pawlett, baby". The subject of the song remains a waitress working at a cocktail bar, rather than the talismanic midfielder who has scored six goals in his 93 appearances for the club.

Richard Albiston, who founded the Facebook campaign, seemed happy to have any version making the charts: "The page was set up as a bit of fun. I never expected it to take off as much as it has."

Don't You Want Me is the UK's 24th biggest-selling single of all time. It is currently placed at No 12, but has been rising sharply. If it makes the top 10, it will be the band's first appearance there since Tell Me When peaked at No 6 in January 1995. It is currently climbing the iTunes top 10 singles chart.


theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

10 essential dance tracks from former next big things

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Thu 20 Mar 2014 5:20 pm

Blog jam: Underground electronic music blog Turks and Underdog puts together a playlist of early tracks from artists who went on to bigger things


How Mica Levi got Under The Skin of her first film soundtrack

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Sat 15 Mar 2014 7:00 am

The Guildhall-trained Micachu And The Shapes musician took inspiration from John Cage, strip-club music and euphoric dance for her soundtrack to the new Scarlett Johnannson movie

Composing for a film was such new territory for me that I approached Under The Skin like it could suddenly be gone tomorrow. I actually kept it a secret from a lot of people while I was working on it. The first call came from out of the blue, and when I went to meet [director] Jonathan Glazer and [music producer] Peter Raeburn, they showed me some footage and we talked about what the music could be in a pretty abstract way. Jon didn't prescribe anything; he just asked me to follow my own trajectory.

I've heard the word "otherworldly" used a couple of times to describe the music but that wasn't a specific instruction from Jon and Pete. The idea was to follow Scarlett Johansson's character and try to react in real time to what she was experiencing, not to pre-empt or reflect on things that had already happened in the film. Some parts are intended to be quite difficult. If your lifeforce is being distilled by an alien, it's not necessarily going to sound very nice. It's supposed to be physical, alarming, hot.

It was a very immersive experience, and I got obsessed with it. It took about nine months of working pretty constantly. I've made my own instruments in the past but for this I mainly used viola to write and record, although we brought in other players to back up my rusty playing and thicken things up. I used to have a studio in a shipping container so I did some work there initially but after that I was in Pete's studio two or three times a week.


Reading this on mobile? Click here to view

I previously studied at Guildhall, and the music I wrote back then for string quartet used a lot of harmonics and extended techniques. For Under The Skin, we were looking at the natural sound of an instrument to try and find something identifiably human in it, then slowing things down or changing the pitch of it to make it feel uncomfortable. There was a lot of talk of perverting material. It does sound creepy, but we were going for sexy.

I didn't listen to a lot of other soundtracks while I was writing; I was worried about being porous. A lot of the influences either came from quite visual directions or 20th-century music I'd cut my teeth on at Guildhall: Giacinto Scelsi, Iannis Xenakis and John Cage… these big, music-changing composers. But I also took a lot of inspiration from strip-club music and euphoric dance as well.

It was a totally different experience from making music as Micachu And The Shapes, but I really don't have that many dimensions so there must be some similarities; they both involve collaboration. I first saw the full film at Venice last year, and afterwards there was some cheering and a bit of booing but I think it's good that people have reacted strongly to it. It's hard for me to be objective, but I'm very proud of it.

Under The Skin is in UK cinemas now; the soundtrack is released on 31 Mar


theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

A morning with Sound Introversion Radio at the Adelaide festival – video

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Wed 12 Mar 2014 3:18 am

Each morning during the Adelaide festival, ambient noise specialists Jason Sweeney and Yuri Tomanek scour the streets of the city for the noises that usually pass many of us by. By tweaking, filtering and mixing the sounds they collect, they turn traffic, buskers and snippets of conversations into an aural record of the city, 24 hours a day at www.soundintroversion.com


The aesthetics of imperfection: why I love old school cassettes

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Fri 7 Mar 2014 2:00 pm

Nick Edwards, aka Bristol's Ekoplekz, explains how analogue technologies can still take music to intriguing new places

Sometime in the late 1980s I made the fateful decision to begin recording my own electronic music. Not easy for a teenager with no money, no equipment, and no ability. These days, I can download a free app on my phone to get me started, but back then it was much more difficult.

My first instrument was a Casio SK-100 keyboard. It had a few terrible preset sounds and only allowed for two seconds of sampling time. Even by the standards of the day, it was little more than a musical toy. My recording equipment, meanwhile, consisted of a cheap music centre I got for Christmas in 1983 and a semi-functional ghetto-blaster I'd bought secondhand.

But in my youthful exuberance, I believed I could coax some serious musical statements out of this peculiar set-up. I would record sounds on to the music centre's tape deck through its microphone input, then play them back through the speakers, while playing more sounds on the keyboard through its own inbuilt speaker. I captured the results as they pushed the air around in my bedroom via the inbuilt microphone of the ghetto-blaster. This, I called "overdubbing". Needless to say, the results were crude and of little musical merit, but to my young mind I was being edgy and experimental. I actually felt superior to my friends who were playing in real "live" bands.

As the 1990s progessed, the analogue recording medium was gradually superseded by digital, and I followed the trend. I bought a DAT recorder, then a digital eight-track, then fooled around with software. But somewhere along the line I began to realise that the quest for recorded perfection was not where my heart lay. The cold vacuum of pristine digital sound lacked the character, imperfection and murky depth of analogue home recording. Not only was I finding my own pre-digital efforts more attractive, I was also being drawn back to other analogue recordings of the late 20th century, the more rough and homespun the better. The crepuscular world of DIY post-punk and industrial, the nebulous echoes of vintage dub-reggae, and the shoestring experiments of early radiophonics, in particular, formed a base of inspiration.

I continue to adhere to the cassette tape as my primary recording format. The smooth, chocolatey warmth of high-end reel-to-reel tape recording is as much anethema to me as Pro Tools. Instead, I encourage tape hiss and electrical hum like a research chemist encourages mould cultures. Exploring the aesthetics of imperfection, those things that were once unavoidable and unsatisfactory, now creates pathways to the unexpected and the uncanny. Neither lo-fi nor hi-fi, it exists in some sideways dimension. What else could I call this type of sound reproduction?

Unfidelity is out in the UK on Planet Mu on Monday


theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

The dawn of a rave new world – in pictures

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Sun 23 Feb 2014 1:05 am

Luke Bainbridge revisits the birth of acid house


What novels are crying out for a musical adaptation?

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Wed 19 Feb 2014 5:45 pm

Open thread: Following news that Billy Corgan is to perform eight-hour jam inspired by Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha, let us know what other literary works deserve the musical treatment – and by which artist?


Which songs make best use of the Roland 808, 909 and 303?

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Fri 14 Feb 2014 12:08 pm

Open thread: nominate your best-loved tracks featuring prominent use of Roland’s iconic drum machines and bass synth


10 charged over stampede at Love Parade festival in which 21 died

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2014 2:46 pm

Event organisers and city workers in Germany accused of manslaughter and bodily harm all deny wrongdoing

German prosecutors have charged 10 people with charges including involuntary manslaughter and bodily harm over a stampede at a electronic dance music festival in 2010 which resulted in 21 deaths.

Six private event organisers and four city workers face five years in jail if convicted over the deaths and injuries at the annual Love Parade festival.

Mass panic broke out at the event in Duisburg, in the west of the country, because the only entrance gate was too small for the huge crowd.

The 10 charged have denied wrongdoing, the city prosecutor Horst Bien told journalists.

"Something happened on July 24, 2010, that should never have happened," Bien said. "We weren't looking to see who was morally or politically responsible but instead focused only on who was criminally liable."

Eight foreigners – from Spain, Bosnia, the Netherlands, Australia, Italy and China – were among those killed when young people pushed through an underpass into the festival grounds at a former freight rail yard.

State prosecutors investigated why an event set up for 250,000 people ended up with nearly 500,000 attending.

Bien said the access was clearly too narrow to cope with the number of people who were expected. He argued that the event employees should have recognised that, and that the city employees shouldn't have given the event a permit to go ahead.

"Mistakes in planning were the main reason for the disaster," Bien said.

Accustomed to a high degree of efficiency and organisation at such events, Germans were dumbfounded by the chaos and by media reports that officials and organisers did not heed warnings that there would be problems with such a massive crowd. The Duisburg state court now has to decide whether to send the case to trial. It wasn't immediately clear when that might happen.


theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Subb-an featuring Cedric Gasaida: Say No More – music video

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Fri 7 Feb 2014 4:51 pm

Music video for Say No More, a collaboration between Cédric Gasaida, vocalists with electronic neo-house outfit Azari & III, and British producer Subb-an


Public Service Broadcasting keep calm and carry on

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Thu 6 Feb 2014 4:50 pm

This tweed-sporting duo took Mr Cholmondley-Warner to the dancefloor with debut Inform-Educate-Entertain. But is their found-sound electronica a formula with built-in limitations?

It's a wet morning in London when one of the men behind Public Service Broadcasting comes splashing through the rain into a restaurant housed in a massive old grain store just north of King's Cross station. John, as he introduces himself, is unremarkable in an old pair of jeans and a white shirt, undone at the collar. He orders a pot of tea. Normally at this time he's taking his tea to the freezing garage that serves as his makeshift studio across town in south-east London. There, he sifts through archive footage from film and radio broadcasts, picking bits of dialogue to set to music that slips between krautrock, synth-pop and cinematic post-rock reminiscent of British Sea Power. For live shows, John dons a bowtie and tweed to become J Willgoose Esq, a character who exists somewhere between Doctor Who and the kind of history teacher whose halitosis travels round corners. With his drummer Wrigglesworth by his side, Willgoose is a wacky professor diving into the past like Mary Poppins did with puddles, breathing new life into old recordings.

Though PSB now say their mission is to "teach the lessons of the past through the music of the present", Willgoose first started using samples simply because he didn't want to sing. "Singing is never going to work. I'm not going to be happy with it, I'm not going to be comfortable playing it to other people," he explains. Inspired by DJ Shadow, Unkle, and the Manic Street Preachers album The Holy Bible, Willgoose started making what he calls frivolous attempts at sampling over a decade ago. As the samples began to shape the direction on the songs themselves, he realised he'd have to learn the stories behind them. "The interest in the historical side came purely from a sound perspective," he explains. "I wanted something with a bit of character and history and weight behind it."

The formula has proven popular. Last year, PSB played 150 shows and released a debut album, Inform-Educate-Entertain, based on public information films, that reached No 21 in the charts. They supported Manic Street Preachers on tour and played the William's Green stage at Glastonbury to such an enormous reaction he fears they might never be able to top it. If they're going to, they've got to answer the critics who believe the formula has insurmountable limitations. "I'm confident that we can prove a lot of people who think we're a short-lived dead-end project wrong," Willgoose says. "A lot people give us quite a lot of credit for doing things slightly differently and then they assume we've got to this point now and that's it. Do you say to the lead singer of a band: 'What's going to happen when you run out of words?'"

Archive material certainly isn't in short supply. PSB have a good relationship with the British Film Institute, which is keen to let the band bring its archives to a bigger audience (as well as sampling the dialogue for their recordings, the PSB live show features extensive use of the films themselves), and it's easier than ever to find new footage to use now that so much of it is being digitised. "I'm not worried about the concept," Willgoose says. "I'm worried that the music is not going to be good enough, basically."

'We're about using the technology of the day to take stuff from the past and recontextualise it in the present, rather than being some kind of retro throwback'

But relying on samples, rather than words, can be a tricky business, especially when Willgoose isn't setting out to soundtrack history but rather to find bits to fit his songs. Often the samples can take on a different meaning entirely in their new context. On 22 May last year, the day Lee Rigby was murdered in Woolwich, PSB played a show at the Village Underground in London, opening with London Can Take It. Over brooding strings and a dark, synth pulse came the voice of Quentin Reynolds in Humphrey Jennings's 1940 propaganda broadcast: "The sign of a great fighter is, can he get up from the floor after being knocked down? London does this every morning. There is no panic, despair or fear in London town."

"It did feel oddly appropriate," Willgoose says. "Sometimes the original meaning of the film translates forward like that, but others you have a more ironic or slightly detached translation." On Lit Up, Willgoose uses shimmering synths to lend majesty to a 1937 broadcast by Thomas Woodrooffe, who was so sloshed at the time he had to be taken off air. Signal 30, which takes its name from a notorious American road safety film from the 50s, is a rampant, Wacky Races collage of pounding drums and screaming tyres, while Spitfire, which seems at first like a rousing tribute to the triumph of British engineering over the Germans, is set to krautrock. "There is a subversion of sorts going on with it," Willgoose says. "We're about using the technology of the day to take stuff from the past and recontextualise it in the present, rather than being some kind of retro-throwback to some bygone age when Britain was great."

Whether the audience gets the gags is the one thing PSB can't control. The costumes are supposed to add to the appeal, as is the computer-generated voice Willgoose uses to communicate at shows. And, though they used the Lord Reith's mission statement for the BBC as their album title, Willgoose says they don't profess to do a great deal of informing or educating. "It's entertainment first," he says. "It's quite a snappy title, though."

Watch Public Service Broadcasting performing live from 8pm on Friday 7 February, when we livestream the first night of the Other Voices festival from Derry.


theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

Blog of the week: Stray Landings

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Wed 5 Feb 2014 6:51 pm

Blog jam: An electronic music site that avoids quick-fire blogging in favour of considered takes on the new, interesting and undiscovered


Other Voices Derry 2014: Poliça and East India Youth in our third live stream

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Tue 4 Feb 2014 3:30 pm

From 8pm on Sunday 9 February, we're streaming the final night of the Other Voices festival from Derry, Northern Ireland.


Recommend us a song

Delivered... Music: Electronic music | theguardian.com | Scene | Fri 31 Jan 2014 12:30 pm

Open thread: Heard something you think more people should be listening to? Post it here


Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme