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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Events


In Adversarial Feelings, Lorem explores AI’s emotional undercurrents

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Fri 7 Jun 2019 12:05 am

In glitching collisions of faces, percussive bolts of lightning, Lorem has ripped open machine learning’s generative powers in a new audiovisual work. Here’s the artist on what he’s doing, as he’s about to join a new inquisitive club series in Berlin.

Machine learning that derives gestures from System Exclusive MIDI data … surprising spectacles of unnatural adversarial neural nets … Lorem’s latest AV work has it all.

And by pairing producer Francesco D’Abbraccio with a team of creators across media, it brings together a serious think tank of artist-engineers pushing machine learning and neural nets to new places. The project, as he describes it:

Lorem is a music-driven mutidisciplinary project working with neural networks and AI systems to produce sounds, visuals and texts. In the last three years I had the opportunity to collaborate with AI artists (Mario Klingemann, Yuma Kishi), AI researchers (Damien Henry, Nicola Cattabiani), Videoartists (Karol Sudolski, Mirek Hardiker) and music intruments designers (Luca Pagan, Paolo Ferrari) to produce original materials.

Adversarial Feelings is the first release by Lorem, and it’s a 22 min AV piece + 9 music tracks and a book. The record will be released on APR 19th on Krisis via Cargo Music.

And what about achieving intimacy with nets? He explains:

Neural Networks are nowadays widely used to detect, classify and reconstruct emotions, mainly in order to map users behaviours and to affect them in effective ways. But what happens when we use Machine Learning to perform human feelings? And what if we use it to produce autonomous behaviours, rather then to affect consumers? Adversarial Feelings is an attempt to inform non-human intelligence with “emotional data sets”, in order to build an “algorithmic intimacy” through those intelligent devices. The goal is to observe subjective/affective dimension of intimacy from the outside, to speak about human emotions as perceived by non-human eyes. Transposing them into a new shape helps Lorem to embrace a new perspective, and to recognise fractured experiences.

I spoke with Francesco as he made the plane trip toward Berlin. Friday night, he joins a new series called KEYS, which injects new inquiry into the club space – AV performance, talks, all mixed up with nightlife. It’s the sort of thing you get in festivals, but in festivals all those ideas have been packaged and finished. KEYS, at a new post-industrial space called Trauma Bar near Hauptbahnhof, is a laboratory. And, of course, I like laboratories. So I was pleased to hear what mad science was generating all of this – the team of humans and machines alike.

So I understand the ‘AI’ theme – am I correct in understanding that the focus to derive this emotional meaning was on text? Did it figure into the work in any other ways, too?

Neural Networks and AI were involved in almost every step of the project. On the musical side, they were used mainly to generate MIDI patterns, to deal with SysEx from a digital sampler and to manage recursive re-sampling and intelligent timestretch. Rather then generating the final audio, the goal here was to simulate musician’s behaviors and his creative processes.

On the video side, [neural networks] (especially GANs [generative adverserial networks]) were employed both to generate images and to explore the latent spaces through custom tailored algorithms, in order to let the system edit the video autonomously, according with the audio source.

What data were you training on for the musical patterns?

MIDI – basically I trained the NN on patterns I create.

And wait, SysEx, what? What were you doing with that?

Basically I record every change of state of a sampler (i.e. the automations on a knob), and I ask the machine to “play” the same patch of the sampler according to what it learned from my behavior.

What led you to getting involved in this area? And was there some education involved just given the technical complexity of machine learning, for instance?

I always tried to express my work through multidisciplinary projects. I am very fascinated by the way AI approaches data, allowing us to work across different media with the same perspective. Intelligent devices are really a great tool to melt languages. On the other hand, AI emergency discloses political questions we try to face since some years at Krisis Publishing.
I started working through the Lorem project three years ago, and I was really a newbie on the technical side. I am not a hyper-skilled programmer, and building a collaborative platform has been really important to Lorem’s development. I had the chance to collaborate with AI artists (Klingemann, Kishi), researchers (Henry, Cattabiani, Ferrari), digital artists (Sudolski, Hardiker)…

How did the collaborations work – Mario I’ve known for a while; how did you work with such a diverse team; who did what? What kind of feedback did you get from them?

To be honest, I was very surprised about how open and responsive is the AI community! Some of the people involved are really huge points of reference for me (like Mario, for instance), and I didn’t expect to really get them on Adversarial Feelings. Some of the people involved prepared original contents for the release (Mario, for instance, realised a video on “The Sky would Clear What the …”, Yuma Kishi realized the girl/flower on “Sonnet#002” and Damien Henry did the train hallucination on “Shonx – Canton” remix. With other people involved, the collaboration was more based on producing something together, such a video, a piece of code or a way to explore Latent Spaces.

What was the role of instrument builders – what are we hearing in the sound, then?

Some of the artists and researchers involved realized some videos from the audio tracks (Mario Klingemann, Yuma Kishi). Damien Henry gave me the right to use a video he made with his Next Frame Prediction model. Karol Sudolski and Nicola Cattabiani worked with me in developing respectively “Are Eyes invisible Socket Contenders” + “Natural Readers” and “3402 Selves”. Karol Sudolski also realized the video part on “Trying to Speak”. Nicola Cattabiani developed the ELERP algorithm with me (to let the network edit videos according with the music) and GRUMIDI (the network working with my midi files). Mirek Hardiker built the data set for the third chapter of the book.

I wonder what it means for you to make this an immersive performance. What’s the experience you want for that audience; how does that fit into your theme?

I would say Adversarial Feelings is a AV show totally based on emotions. I always try to prepare the most intense, emotional and direct experience I can.

You talk about the emotional content here and its role in the machine learning. How are you relating emotionally to that content; what’s your feeling as you’re performing this? And did the algorithmic material produce a different emotional investment or connection for you?

It’s a bit like when I was a kid and I was listening at my recorded voice… it was always strange: I wasn’t fully able to recognize my voice as it sounded from the outside. I think neural networks can be an interesting tool to observe our own subjectivity from external, non-human eyes.

The AI hook is of course really visible at the moment. How do you relate to other artists who have done high-profile material in this area recently (Herndon/Dryhurst, Actress, etc.)? And do you feel there’s a growing scene here – is this a medium that has a chance to flourish, or will the electronic arts world just move on to the next buzzword in a year before people get the chance to flesh out more ideas?

I messaged a couple of times Holly Herndon online… I’m really into her work since her early releases, and when I heard she was working on AI systems I was trying to finish Adversarial Feelings videos… so I was so curious to discover her way to deal with intelligent systems! She’s a really talented artist, and I love the way she’s able to embed conceptual/political frameworks inside her music. Proto is a really complex, inspiring device.

More in general, I think the advent of a new technology always discloses new possibilities in artistic practices. I directly experienced the impact of internet (and of digital culture) on art, design and music when I was a kid. I’m thrilled by the fact at this point new configurations are not yet codified in established languages, and I feel working on AI today give me the possibility to be part of a public debate about how to set new standards for the discipline.

What can we expect to see / hear today in Berlin? Is it meaningful to get to do this in this context in KEYS / Trauma Bar?

I am curious too, to be honest. I am very excited to take part of such situation, beside artists and researchers I really respect and enjoy. I think the guys at KEYS are trying to do something beautiful and challenging.

Live in Berlin, 7 June

Lorem will join Lexachast (an ongoing collaborative work by Amnesia Scanner, Bill Kouligas and Harm van den Dorpel), N1L (an A/V artist, producer/dj based between Riga, Berlin, and Cairo), and a series of other tantalizing performances and lectures at Trauma Bar.

KEYS: Artificial Intelligence | Lexachast • Lorem • N1L & more [Facebook event]

Lorem project lives here:

http://www.studio-frames.com

The post In Adversarial Feelings, Lorem explores AI’s emotional undercurrents appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Heard it all before? Talking sound, discovery, and inspiration

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Tue 14 May 2019 8:37 pm

Sometimes lost in conversations about technology or specific musical genre or minutia of social media is the fundamental question of what sound is and what we can discover. From Berlin’s tech/culture conference re:publica, we got to tackle some of those questions.

I got to ask three fascinating individuals about their connection to sound and where future sounds might be discovered. On the panel last week:

Kathy Tafel, now at Native Instruments, has one of the broader backgrounds in the entire music technology realm, spanning the birth of the DAW (Deck II!) to key roles at Apple to her ground-breaking multimedia band D’Cückoo. And now she’s charting the course of projects like Sounds.com and TRAKTOR and – I have to say, I’m optimistic about the direction she’s taking them. (Kathy probably merits a separate story on this site if I can compel NI to agree to it.)

I don’t know whether Kathy wants this trip down memory lane, but let’s go there – a MIDI ball:

Valentin von Lindenau has diverse work across audio and music, and with his firm kling klang klong has established himself as a rare leader in audio interaction experience and design, in a way that leads this medium internationally.

Lucrecia Dalt has come from Colombia to making a name for herself in the packed artistic landscape of Berlin, with unique poetic-musical hybrids. Maybe better to let her speak for herself:

We tread lots of ground here – I can’t take credit for either the topic/theme or the selection of panelists, but I’m grateful to have participated in the program.

And actually – I’m glad to even flounder on this sort of topic, but ask ourselves those kinds of deeper questions. I have my own opinions, naturally, but I was keen to get these fresh perspectives.

The full topic:

Can music and sounds be developed infinitely, or is everything at some point composed and tried out? If we follow John Cage and reserve the word “music” for eighteenth- and nineteenth-century instrument, the contemporary “organizer of sound” will not only be faced with the entire field of sound but also with the entire field of time. Matthew Herbert on the other hand stands with his manifesto for a kind of artistic self-limitation, demanding for instance that the sampling of other people’s music is strictly forbidden and that the use of sounds that exist already is not allowed (No drum machines. No synthesizers. No presets). For our reality check, we want to discuss what sound engineers, designers and artists are working on right now. Which sounds actually sound new and why? And also – which new applications for such sounds are in the works or theoretically conceivable?

+++

Sources / inspirations:

John Cage
«The Future of Music – Credo»
http://www.medienkunstnetz.de/source-text/41/

Matthew Herbert
P.C.C.O.M.
https://matthewherbert.com/about-contact/manifesto/

And I’m interested to hear your reflections, too – do let us know your answers, whether the sound that first inspired you as a kid or the way you get in the flow for new sounds now.

I’m still pondering some of the ideas all three of our panelists raised about flow and inspiration. Keep listening.

The post Heard it all before? Talking sound, discovery, and inspiration appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Design, meet music: gorgeous graphic scores from LETRA / TONE fest

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Events,Scene | Thu 7 Mar 2019 7:11 pm

Nine designers created graphics scores. Next, nine musicians will interpret them. LETRA / TONE festival is one of the more compelling experiments in festival programming – an adventure in crossing media. Here’s what it looks like.

Now, in these here parts, we’ve been fans of visual-musical synesthesia, from live visuals and VJing to graphics. LETRA / TONE makes that connection in the score. Curator (and composer/musician) Hanno Leichtmann had the idea. Five years ago, I covered one of the earlier editions:

Pattern and Design: A 2-Day Festival Turns Vintage Type into Musical Scores

The gathering has since blossomed to include a wide arrange of international designers and big-name (and fringe) musical artists across various instruments. There’s a complete exhibition and loads of concerts this weekend.

And you never know quite what you’ll get, because it’s up to these artists to determine how to translate the visual ideas they’re given into performances. This being Berlin, there are some major electronic artists – modular electro duo Blotter Trax (Magda and T.B. Arthur), turntablist Dieb 13, JASSS, Nefertyti, and DEMDIKE STARE are all involved. But you also get pianist Magda Mayas, and Schneider TM takes to experimental guitar, composer and avant garde rocker Jimi Tenor. Hanno has not only paired artists with musicians, but produced some arranged musical marriages, too – commissioning Blotter Trax, pairing Nefertyti with Jimi Tenor.

Graphic scores come from Katja Gretzinger, Anke Fesel, Scott Massey, Daniela Burger, Stefan Gandl, Joe Gilmore, Sulki & Min, Julie Gayard, and T.S.Wendelstein.

To bring a bit of this festival to you, here’s a selection of images from past editions (and current sketches) to show the visual range. You can imagine yourself how you might make music from these.

And snippets of 2019:

To give you a feel of the music, some selected artists:

JASSS:

Demdike Stare:

Blotter Trax:

Nefertyti (bad video but… I’m enjoying this punk aesthetic here):

Facebook event if you’re in Berlin this weekend:

https://www.facebook.com/events/2212145495720491/?active_tab=about

The post Design, meet music: gorgeous graphic scores from LETRA / TONE fest appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

9th Norient Musikfilm Festival 2019

Delivered... norient | Events,Scene | Wed 5 Dec 2018 11:00 am

The Norient Musikfilm Festival is back. After a year off, the 9th edition will be taking place between January 10 and 13, 2019, in Switzerland (Bern, St. Gallen, Lausanne). We will be screening thirteen music films dealing with the current topics of migration, futurism, dance, tradition, cultural diplomacy, and war. The live acts and DJanes include Goodiepal & Pals, Dim Grimm (Dimlite), Kries, Clara!, and Bamz, who will offer a musical spectrum ranging from Croatian folk, political performance, and sound experiments, to UK funky house and reggaetón. This year’s festival will open with the documentary about English-Tamil world music 2.0 superstar Matangi/Maya/M.I.A., which was nominated for the Sundance Film Festival. Deutsche Version im unteren Teil.

Check full program on the festival website.

Festival poster: artwork by Guillermo González Bravo (Mexico); Art Design by Annegreth Schärli (Switzerland)

Das Norient Musikfilm Festival ist zurück. Nach einem Jahr Pause findet die neunte Ausgabe vom 10. bis 13. Januar 2019 in Bern (Reitschule, City Pub, Jugendzentrum newgraffiti), St. Gallen (Palace) und Lausanne (Le Bourg) statt. Gezeigt werden 13 Musikfilme zu aktuellen Themen wie Migration, Futurismus, Tanz, Tradition, kulturelle Diplomatie und Krieg. Die Live-Acts und DJanes Goodiepal & Pals, Dim Grimm (Dimlite), Kries, Clara! und Bamz offerieren ein musikalisches Spektrum zwischen kroatischem Folk, Politperformance, Klangexperimenten, UK Funky House und Reggaetón. In Bern arbeitet Norient neu mit dem schweizerisch-bosnischen Verein Kultur Shock zusammen und will ausserhalb der Innenstadt ein neues Publikum ansprechen. Das fürs Sundance Film Festival nominierte Portrait Matangi/Maya/M.I.A. über den englisch-tamilischen Weltmusik 2.0-Superstar M.I.A. eröffnet das Festival.

Das gesamte Programm gibt es auf der Festival-Homepage.

Conversations and an overflow of music, streaming from Ableton Loop

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Fri 9 Nov 2018 10:43 pm

Don’t have a ticket to Ableton’s Loop “summit for music makers” in Los Angeles? There’s an overabundance of music and conversation from the gathered artists streaming, much of it live, available now.

For starters, your chance to get involved is the 90-second music challenge, on today:

https://loop.ableton.com/2018/start-here/

(90 whole seconds? Maybe it’s time to redo our 1-second “leap second” music challenge. Apologies for the broken link there – I know that file is in our archives; stay tuned.)

It’s easy to imagine Loop as turning into something really focused on the particular software and hardware products from Ableton, but the people programming the event have made it something very different. Loop’s programming itself extends through a range of artistic and technological frontiers, many of them only tangentially related to Live or Push – everything from AI to electronic instrument engineering to sonifying data from space. Most of that does require a ticket – which means you need to be in Los Angeles right now, and tickets were in short supply. (Even for ticket holders, capacities are constrained as workshops and seminars often take place in small quarters.)

What you can get access to is a couple of the mainstage talks, and a whole bunch of the music culture around Loop. That says a lot about the kind of artists Ableton has befriended, and the sort of hub Los Angeles can be for musicians. So Dublab Radio are broadcasting, for instance – and they’ve made Loop their home.

We’ll be talking to artists, too, in our own way – stay tuned for that. But meanwhile, part of what I get is that there’s a ton of music to experience. It’s not just one genre, and it’s also not just about the people Loop programmers thought were important. If music production tools are driven by an urge to create and share, then it’s little wonder that the participants here have self-organized their own collaborative playlist to share what they’re doing.

So let’s listen. Here’s your guide:

Loop has their live streaming schedule online, with events starting mainly 2PM (5PM NYC, 11PM Berlin) daily, earlier on Saturday:
https://loop.ableton.com/2018/streaming-schedule/

Timing on the West Coast of the USA tends to run a little late even in the Americas, and winds up at weird hours for Europe/Africa and the Eastern Hemisphere. But here you go — think afternoon – early evening LA time Friday and Saturday and afternoon Sunday. That means evening east coast USA, early morning Japan, and … Europe you might want to wait for the archive unless you’re a night owl.

Highlights for me include Sunday – Damien Licht has been doing some great productions and has a new album, and shesaid.so, Naomi Mitchell & Coco Solid should be terrific as they’re bringing in loads of new and diverse music interests and community activation. Plus Dennis DeSantis, Laura Escudé, Patrice Rushen, Photay talking Saturday about what happens when plans go awry – well, that’s relevant to all of us, and this is an utterly amazing selection of different life experiences professionally. We all talk about the Instagram-friendly perfect side of our creative lives, and very rarely about the failures – even if adjusting to failures is usually where the good stuff happens.

Plus there are live performances in the evening if you can catch them.

Music you can tune in any time, though, via Spotify.

What’s great is the chance for participants to share with one another:

And Dublab would love to welcome you to LA’s extraordinarily dynamic scene:

For more sounds – including the lineup at Loop and a guide to why the venue EastWest Studios has put out music you already know and love:

https://loop.ableton.com/2018/loop-spotify/

And if you are at Loop, see you here:

Touch, Code, Play: creating hybrid physical-digital music instruments

The post Conversations and an overflow of music, streaming from Ableton Loop appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Norient Co-Curates ISM Hexadome

Delivered... norient | Events,Scene | Wed 4 Apr 2018 3:56 pm

The ISM Hexadome is an immersive 360° audiovisual exhibition combining art and technology and features nine audiovisual performances and installations from international artists curated by ISM and Norient. The project is the first step in the Institute for Sound & Music’s initiative to build a museum in recognition of sound, immersive arts, and electronic music culture. Norient curated two artists into the project: Lara Sarkissian and CAO. The events featuring Brian Eno, Thom Yorke, and others, are taking place between March 29 and April 22, 2018, at Martin-Gropius-Bau in Berlin, Germany.

The ISM Hexadome is comprised of a visual projection architecture designed by Berlin digital media studio, Pfadfinderei, and the «Klangdom», an advanced multi-channel speaker configuration created by ZKM | Institute for Music and Acoustics Karlsruhe. The Klangdom is controlled by the software Zirkonium developed by ZKM and 3D audio mixing software Panoramix developed by IRCAM’s STMS Research Lab.

Performances and Installations: Schedule

April 13, 20h/22h, Live Performance
Lara Sarkissian & Jemma Woolmore | Frank Bretschneider & Pierce Warnecke

April 14, 16h, Artist Talk
Diasporian Narratives: Archiving, Sampling, and Politics in the Tracks of Lara Sarkission
Moderated by Hannes Liechti, Norient

April 14-15, 10-22h, Installation
Lara Sarkissian & Jemma Woolmore | Frank Bretschneider & Pierce Warnecke

April 20, 20h/22h, Live Performance
Peter van Hoesen & Heleen Blanken | CAO & Michael Tan

April 21-22, 10-(19)22h, Installation
Ben Frost & MFO | Holly Herndon & Mathew Dryhurst | CAO & Michael Tan | Peter van Hoesen & Heleen Blanken

For all dates of the following artists check ISM Hexadome website.

Brian Eno
Tarik Barri & Thom Yorke
Holly Herndon & Mathew Dryhurst
Ben Frost and MFO
Pfadfinderei & René Löwe

Norient Artist Selection for ISM Hexadome

Lara Sarkissian

Lara Sarkissian (left) and Jemma Woolmore (right) (Photos © Promo)

Hexadome Installation Piece with Jemma Woolmore:
Thresholds

Thresholds creates a transsensorial space for storytelling on topics of territory, recognition and memory. Together musician Lara Sarkissian and artist Jemma Woolmore craft an immersive experience from aural and physical architectures; playing with disorientation, stability, unrest, familiarity and recollection.

The piece is an ambient electronic landscape referencing Armenian music, field recordings and churches (both in its sonic and physical form); as the architecture of churches have often been designed with the intentions of acoustic ecology and spatial experiences in mind. The score collages elements of voices, hymns, instruments; holding space for modern day Armenian narratives tied to uprooted ancestral pasts [and present].

The hexadome screens become a landscape to be navigated and divided, creating symbolic borders that are enforced, blurred or dissolved throughout the work. Patterns emerge that appear to both isolate and encompass, generating complex and unfamiliar territories, exploring the fragile boundary between Utopia and Dystopia.

Lara Sarkissian is a sound artist, DJ (FOOZOOL) and filmmaker based in San Francisco, CA. She is co-founder of Club Chai; a music label, radio show, and curatorial project that artistically hybridizes non western sounds and visuals with contemporary western culture. Lara Sarkissian’s electronic music focuses on ambient/experimental productions with Armenian influences and scores films and installations. Follow Sarkissian on her Website, Bandcamp, Facebook, Mixcloud, and SoundCloud.

CAO

CAO and Michael Tan (Photos © Promo)

Hexadome Installation Piece with Michael Tan:
The Burial Theme: Trans-Matter Port and Objects

Inspired by ancient Moche iconography and cosmology, the work explores the dualities of life/death, generation/destruction, and cohesion/dispersion cycles and how they appear as two planes constantly transposed onto one another. The Moche cosmology envisioned certain gates that render the intersections of both planes as a space for events. One of these might be considered the ceremonial or ritual space, a realm in which the distance and division between both worlds would blur.

The work aims to explore the ceremonial object both in its native context and as an «unearthed object», expressing its connection with both ancient narratives and the transience and decay that operate in the natural world. This object, usually presented as a recipient, acts as a gate or a threshold, a geometrical key, and signifies generative space and the readiness preparatory to a transfer between worlds (living/dead, vision/blindness, sacred/profane, etc.).

Constanza Bizraelli aka CAO is a Peruvian electronic music composer and producer, artist, and theorist. She is the director and editor-in-chief of Cyclops Journal, an academic publication dedicated to contemporary theory, theory of religion, and experimental theory. Follow CAO on her Website, Facebook, SoundCloud, and Twitter.

The Poster

At Superbooth, expect new synth news, and grand instrumentalism

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Wed 28 Mar 2018 5:07 pm

From a crowded stand in Frankfurt to a sprawling show in East Berlin, Superbooth has become a modular mecca and the premiere synthesizer summit on the world calendar.

And if you think about it, that’s pretty astonishing. NAMM (National Association of Music Merchants) in California remains the destination for the musical instrument industry at large, and it and a number of other events draw big crowds of synth lovers. But Superbooth has become a kind of extension of synthesizer inventor history, of modular subculture, and of the best parts of the Internet today – the bits that just nerd out about cool toys. One- and two-person shops stand literally shoulder to shoulder with major manufacturers.

In short, it’s the triumph of the weird.

“Normal” trade shows these days are what can seem anachronistic. The “trade-only” moniker at NAMM (or Germany’s Musikmesse) has always been confusing, with tire kickers tangled with industry, and a collision of instrumental segments that seem increasingly distant from one another.

Like the quiet, sprawling metropolis of Berlin itself, Superbooth never feels crowded. People amble and linger and chat and chill – all the verbs you never associate with trade shows. But it doesn’t feel like a local synth meet, either. There are 250 exhibitors this year, with stands from names like Ableton, Akai, Avid, Bitwig, Elektron, Eventide, IK Multimedia, KORG, Mackie, Magix, Moog, MOTU, Native Instruments, Nord, Novation, Propellerhead, RME, Roland, ROLI, Softube, Steinberg, Studio Electronics, Waldorf, and … yes, even mighty Yamaha.

Those join a who’s who of modular makers, with an increasing number of American brands alongside what appear to be all the major European names (including Russia).

So, it’s significant that the morning hours are dedicated to trade and professionals, while the afternoons open to the public. “Will you be at Superbooth?” has become the stock question for the synth and electronic end of the waters. And since this is not just a corner of a show with drums and guitars and trombones, you do actually talk to one another and connect.

So what will actually happen this year?

Last year saw a raft of cool stuff:

Go gear crazy with the best synth gear unveiled at Superbooth

Novation hit it out of the park with both Peak and Circuit Mono Station. Bastl Instruments fed us THYME, DUDE, Kong … and their own line of custom-brewed coffee. Behringer had their infamous Minimooog Model D clone to try. Elektron revealed the Digitakt, as Jomox and MFB unveiled boutique drum machines. And of course there were loads of new modules and other toys … not to mention Yamaha with a robot that plays keys.

Last year, this happened – two new Novation synths.

(Compare the inaugural 2016, when Superbooth was more limited to niche modular and analog creations, and many brands still made waves at Frankfurt Messe. By last year, Messe was mostly silence.)

This year, I think you can expect even more big announcements. Given the attention Novation got, I wouldn’t be surprised if a big manufacturer made a splash – even from Japan’s big three, all of whom are in attendance.

Of course, the charm of Superbooth is, those big manufacturers won’t really have any particular advantage over tiny shops. (Well, apart from if you have deeper pockets, you get the cool room with the Soyuz module …)

And I think you can expect … oh, wait, I can’t tell you. I don’t know anything. Expect nothing.

(Oh, one note – I think we’ll continue to see a cottage industry in 5U modules – that’s the larger format – especially as Moog’s own recreation of its vintage modulars is out of reach of most budgets.)

Superbooth 2016 videos

https://vimeo.com/schneidersbuero

On the music side…

As Superbooth gets deeper in the gear territory – not just for modular geeks, but synths fans in general – it’s also building out its roster of musicians. Those reflect some of the Berlin in-crowd’s refined tastes, but this year they also suggest another line.

Superbooth wants you to think of synths and modular as an instrument, in the classic sense of the word.

So you get Caterina Barbieri, a classical guitarist-turned-modular artist, and Leon Michener on a prepared grand piano. There’s Berlin electronic legend Bernd Kistenmacher on synths, and composer Udo Hanten on 5U modulars.

Stephan Schmitt, founder of Native Instruments and father of Generator/Reaktor, will play on his own unique C 15 keyboard, made by his new hardware venture Nonlinear Labs. Carolina Eyck will play Theremin; famed producer Tobi Neumann will play ambient with Fadi.

The night program is also packed with some big names: think #instantboner, T.Raumschmiere & FucketYbUcKetY, Ströme and Tikiman, Boys Noiz with 2244, ATEQ, and GusGus.

It’s not entirely “underground” in character – these are established, premiere artists, and perhaps associated then with established, premiere modular gear, which while increasingly affordable isn’t exactly cheap. But then I think you can also expect lots of unofficial off events and afterparties to spring up, postcards to spread around – and it’s still Berlin. So be sure manufacturers will organize spontaneous jam sessions, visiting nerds will promote gigs, and lots of sound geekery will be had in the days during and immediately around the event. You might want to clear your calendar, plus some, like, recovery time.

On the workshop/talk side, there are various DIY offerings, as well as a female/non-binary program meant to counter-balance an event that has tended to skew fairly heavily male. Daniel Miller, Uwe Schmidt, and Mark Ernestus are in discussion, plus you can catch Lady Starlight, Andrew Huang, Lady Blacktronika, and Mylar Melodies.

The biggest rival to Superbooth I imagine will be Moogfest back in the U.S. of A. – unlikely to have, say, boutique Russian makers at it, but likely to attract some modular purveyors who won’t make the Transatlantic flight. And Moog of course will figure big at their own event. Moogfest also dwarfs Superbooth as far as festival lineup and talks. I’d also keep an eye on SONAR Festival, whose extended tech program often focuses on the European tech scene, plus Music Tech Fest in September.

But as far as synth makers in one place and synth news, Superbooth is the big bet for new tech. I’ll see you there.

Full event schedule

Exhibitor list for this year

superbooth.com

The post At Superbooth, expect new synth news, and grand instrumentalism appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

New Live Series: Sonic Fiction

Delivered... norient | Events,Scene | Mon 5 Mar 2018 9:00 am

Norient is proud to present a new series of concerts and audiovisual performances. In collaboration with the Rewire festival (Den Haag, the Netherlands) and Schauspielhaus Zürich Norient presents the most exciting acts of today's pop music on the theater stage in Zurich, Switzerland. In the first edition on April 21, 2018, the experimental sound worlds of Ben Frost will collide with the dark avant-garde pop of Jenny Hval. Events will also be held on May 12 and June 9. More acts to be announced soon.

Exactly twenty years ago the journalist and writer Kodwo Eshun attempted in his influential book More Brilliant than the Sun – Adventures in Sonic Fiction to rethink the perception of music in general by finding a new language for music (rather than rely on words that leave the radical imaginary space of music untapped). He did this by describing and excavating the unacknowledged traditions of diasporic science fiction, by finding a «future shock» in music and sounds. Today, it is still obvious, how limiting traditional language is, especially attempts to describe current sonic phenomenons; more than ever, pop music is crossing borders, is audiovisual, powerful and aesthetically challenging. Contemporary musicians debate political topics and appear provocative and virtuosic at the same time. With this new series of concerts and audiovisual performances, Norient and Rewire want to present the diversity of the current Sonic Fiction on the theater stage in Zurich to a wider audience. We are looking forward to meet you there.

Directly jump to: line up April 21 | May 12 (tba) | June 9 (tba)

April 21, 2018: Ben Frost / Jenny Hval

20:00h at Schauspielhaus Zürich, Pfauen
Tickets from CHF 35 to 70 (presale open)

Jenny Hval

Jenny Hval has in recent years made a name for herself as a recording artist and writer both in her native Norway and abroad. Multidisciplinary and transgressive are words often employed to describe her art, but Jenny Hval’s polyphonic artistry is in fact seamlessly interwoven between musical, literary, visual and performative modes of expression. Her artistic voice is altogether present, accessible and obscurely complex at the same time. Follow Jenny Hval on Bandcamp, Facebook, SoundCloud, Twitter, or YouTube.

Ben Frost

The music of Ben Frost is about contrast; influenced as much by Classical Minimalism as by Punk Rock and Metal, Frost’s throbbing guitar-based textures emerge from nothing and slowly coalesce into huge, forbidding forms that often eschew conventional structures in favor of the inevitable unfoldings of vast mechanical systems. Follow Ben Frost on Bandcamp, Facebook, SoundCloud, Twitter, Website, or YouTube.

May 12, 2018: Second Edition

20:00h at Schauspielhaus Zürich, Pfauen
Tickets from CHF 35 to 70

Line up to be announced soon.

June 9, 2018: Third Edition

20:00h at Schauspielhaus Zürich, Pfauen
Tickets from CHF 35 to 70

Line up to be announced soon.

Credits

In collaboration with:

Curation: Thomas Burkhalter and Bronne Keesmaat
Cooperation: Theresa Beyer and Hannes Liechti
Project Coordination: Hannes Liechti
Art Design: Caroline Grimm (Schauspielhaus Zürich)

CDM Mixes: Voyage into sound like a mystic space cat, with akkamiau

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Mon 8 Jan 2018 3:09 pm

Start your week right with some underground technoes. akkamiau is the multi-faceted Prague-born Akkamiau Kočičí, and she kicks off a special January for us.

Here in Berlin on Saturday, we’re hosting a special night of live performances with akkamiau joining us for a DJ set rounding out the night:
https://www.residentadvisor.net/events/1053318

They’re all released on or forthcoming on our label Establishment, and all of them have robust projects of their own, from live coding work in the Algorave scene with Miri Kat, to their own up-and-coming label projects (Gradient from Jamaica Suk, Denkfabrik from Nicolas Bougaïeff, and a new project emerging from Stanislav Glazov aka Procedural). They’re also teaching – Stas is a modular and Touch Designer guru traveling the world with those projects; both Nick and Jamaica teach privately, and Nick teaches modulars and coaches composition as Dr. Techno – because he’s a real doctor. Oliver Torr on behalf of Prague’s XYZ project is preparing an interactive light installation that will evolve over the course of the night, as well.

Stratofyzika, intermedia group.

I wanted to invite Lenka to send some vibrations to our readers all over the world. Lenka’s own projects are myriad: she’s a founding member of female:pressure, the network and advocacy organization that has worked for years to break apart the gendering of electronic music, she releases and performs and DJs as akkamiau and hiT͟Hərˈto͞o, and adds live sound and music to the choreography- and audiovisual-driven intermedia project Stratofyzika.

She’s also recently hosted quadraphonic sound workshops, working in Ableton Live, plus the wildly popular jam room at Ableton Loop.

And while the trend these days seems to be on narrowly-defined DJs, I believe all those broad influences come across in her DJ mixes as well as her music. Lenka has shared an exclusive mix with us, recorded straight from the mixer in the grimy confines of Berlin’s club Suicide Circus aka Suicide Club. It was the opening of the respected RITUALS series, which takes commanding, dark techno into Berlin’s Thursday night / Friday morning (well, because this is Berlin, and Thursdays are a big night).

Just don’t expect monotonous pounding. Lenka’s mixing is effortlessly fluid and organic, unfolding across the duration, putting beautiful, strange otherworldly textures atop heavy, dirty pulse. And that seems to have as always Lenka’s quirky cosmic feline character there. That doesn’t mean it’s soft in any way: these space cats have big rockets.

Dark but not drab … industrial with groove … powerful but dreamy … sounds like good new years’ resolutions for techno to me.

Track listing (yep that Ancient Methods and Perc are each two favorites of mine, for starters):

Moerbeck & Subjected – 006SB1
Mamiffer – Enantiodromia
Adam X – It’s All Relative
Alexey Volkov – Corner
H880 – weird signs
Drasko V & Kero – Exponent (Drumcell Remix)
Tensal – Levia
Regis – Keep Planning (Original Mix)
Discord – Backyard Trapp
MTd – Basement (Moerbeck Remix)
P.E.A.R.L. – Station1
Tsorn – Strange Theory
FJAAK – The Tube
Ancient Methods – Knights & Bishops
Perc – Look What Your Love Has Done To Me
H880 – KEPLER
Niki Istrefi – Red Armor

Join us in Berlin if you can, and regardless, stay tuned for more of akkamiau, these other artists, and Establishment. Frohes Neues!

Follow akkamiau on SoundCloud, MixCloud, and Facebook

For more listening, check out akkamiau’s work on Colaboradio 88.4FM Berlin. There’s a special episode devoted to the voice:

— and one highlighting those Ableton Link-ed jam sessions at the company’s Loop conference from November:

Saturday’s event, featuring akkamiau:

Establishment: XL & live [Discount advance tickets exclusively on Resident Advisor]
RSVP on Facebook

The post CDM Mixes: Voyage into sound like a mystic space cat, with akkamiau appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Conference: Pop – Power – Positions

Delivered... norient | Events,Scene | Sun 10 Dec 2017 5:13 pm

From October 18 to 20, 2018, the next biennial research conference by the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, German-speaking branch (IASPM D-A-CH), will be organized in cooperation with Norient. It will take place in Bern, Switzerland at the University of Bern and Bern University of the Arts. Read the Call for Papers below (German version here).

Dis Fig performing in Bern at NMFF 2017 (Photo © by Karin Scheidegger)

Call for Papers

In Nigeria, the high pressure to follow the copyright rules of the globalized pop music market restrains the use of samples in hip hop culture. In Egypt, young musicians have no credit cards, leaving them without access to the online music market. In Europe, second and third generation migrants discuss their non-European backgrounds and European identities in songs and tracks. And U.S.-produced Korean pop music (K-Pop) increasingly rivals Korean-produced K-Pop in its concern for authentic presentation.

Issues of power, position, access, and representation have shaped the production, distribution, and reception of popular music and continue to do so today. The three-day interdisciplinary conference Pop – Power – Positions highlights popular music’s embeddedness in a global world. It seeks to uncover and scrutinize the risks, challenges, and potentials of power structures, positioning, and (re)presentations in popular music. The analysis of global, postcolonial structures plays a central role in this endeavour. To date, however, music– and popular music in particular – has only rarely been studied using postcolonial perspectives.

Postcolonialism refers not only to the historical fact of colonialism and its political, geographical, cultural, and economic impact on the countries and regions in-volved. Rather, postcolonial studies deal with all aspects of cultural diversity, ethnic and cultural difference, and their related power structures. Colonialism as well as postcolonialism refer to hierarchies that are enacted and produced through the construction of the Other and bring about and enforce debateable concepts of representation such as gender, race, ethnic group, nation, class, and culture. In this regard, the effects of (post)colonialism can be detected not only in former colonialized and colonising countries and regions, but also in those which at first sight do not have a colonial heritage, for example Switzerland.

From its beginnings, popular music has been produced and performed in and within (post)colonial (power) structures. Postcolonial traces are, according to Johannes Ismaiel-Wendt, inherent in any popular music (2011). Current productions of popular music in different countries show that (post)colonial conditions live on in popular music, especially in a globalised world, and that musicians as well as recipients react in various ways to this situation.

The conference focuses on (global) power relations and representations of race, cultural difference, ethnicity, gender, class, and nation, including the changes and subversive strategies these may involve. Ethnographic and analytical studies of popular music in and from (former) colonised countries and regions are also welcome. We invite papers that address the following range of topics and questions:

Power
– Who speaks in popular music? What kinds of power structures shape the production, distribution, and reception of popular music? What is the impact of the Anglophone music business on other music markets? Who speaks about popular music in the areas of marketing, advertising, journalism, fan cultures, (global) politics, and educational institutions – and what vocabulary do they use?
– Have digitalisation and digital networks led to a democratisation of musical processes, or the contrary?
– What sounds and music(s) are processed in what contexts by whom and how, and to what aim? How does the use of certain sounds/music(s) point to existing power relations, dependencies, and availability?

Place
– What role do geographies and geopolitics play in popular music-making? How do geography, world order, and power structures relate?
– In what ways can popular music exist beyond cultural, ethnic, and national geographies? What role does the relation between the Global North and Global South have in popular music?

Positions
– How do structures of power and distribution limit the access to the produc-tion and reception of popular music?
– What relevance, usability, and impact do technologies (like Digital Audio Workstations) or legal regulations (like the copyright laws) that have been de-veloped in Western contexts have for popular music? In what ways are (post)colonial structures and power relations (re)produced therein?
– What kinds of representations do musicians use for their marketing? What traits are ascribed to music?

Postcolonialism
– What potential does popular music hold for detecting and changing (or en-forcing) colonial and postcolonial power structures?
– How can postcolonial theories be made fruitful for an up-to-date understand-ing of popular music?
– How do musicians of different forms of popular music process a «(post)colonial experience of the world» («(post)koloniales Welterleben», Ismaiel-Wendt) in their music?

Popular Music Studies
– How marginalised are specific popular musics within the history of popular music?
– Should or can we write a Global History of Popular Music?
– In what way is the concept of popular music in itself (post)colonial?
– What hierarchies, asymmetries or inhibitions can be found in inter-/transdisciplinary Popular Music Studies?

Further Information

Keynote: Dr Jenny Fatou Mbaye (City University London)

Contributions on popular music that lie outside the scope of these topic areas are welcome and will be considered if possible.

The conference invites researchers of Popular Music Studies from all disciplines to take part, for example from musicology, ethnomusicology, anthropology, cultural studies, history, global studies, media and communication studies, postcolonial studies, or sociology. In order to submit a paper or a panel proposal, speakers must be a member of IASPM, respectively of one of its branches (for information on membership see iaspm-dach.net or iaspm.net).

Papers may be given in German or English. Proposals can be made for panels on a special topic including three presentations (60 minutes + 30 minutes discussion) or for single papers (20 minutes + 10 minutes discussion). Please include title, an abstract of 250 words, five keywords, name, academic affiliation, a short biographical note of no more than two sentences, and your contact information.

Submission: Please email your abstract to daniel.allenbach AT hkb.bfh.ch by 28 February 2018.

Papers will anonymized before selection. You will be informed about the selection by 31 March 2018.

Depending on the financial situation, the organisers hope to contribute to travel and accommodation costs of those speakers who have no other sources of sup-port.

There will be arrangements in place for child care.

IASPM D-A-CH will award the Maria-Hanáček-prize for the best presentation held by a doctoral student at the conference.

Organisation

Local Organizing Committee
Dr. Anja Brunner, University of Bern
Hannes Liechti, University of the Arts/Norient
Daniel Allenbach & Sabine Jud, University of the Arts

Hosting Institutions

 
 
Partner

Watch Moogfest kick off with epic 50-hour livestream, lineup – minus men

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Events,Scene | Wed 6 Dec 2017 6:20 pm

Women and transgender artists have too often seen their work in electronic music pushed to the margins. Moogfest’s launch this year puts them first.

Moogfest this year promises to have the mix they’ve been brewing in the latest editions: part music festival, part conference, with music and music technology meeting up with larger themes around science and innovation. The difference is, instead of the presence of female and transgender artists being just another box for curators to tick — “hey, look, we booked some women” — here, they’re leading the announcement. That includes both a 50-hour livestream of back-to-back sets from a pretty amazing and diverse set of artists, plus the first wave announcement of artists.

Here’s Madame Gandhi explaining the idea:

The result is a mixture of people you know really well (legends like Suzanne Ciani, Moor Mother) alongside a lot of artists who are almost certainly new to you – particularly as they’ve been drawn from disparate genres and geographies. Indeed, these are the kind of people who have been quietly pushing music in new directions, but who might get lost in the fine print of music programs, or pushed to the side in music headlines. In fact, I think the upshot is a potential victory not only for gender equality, but for independent and out-of-the-mainstream music, too. And knowing CDM readers, irrespective of your gender, I think that’s a value you’re likely to enjoy seeing represented.

As Ciani tells The New York Times:

For Ms. Ciani, the theme for Moogfest 2018 is only natural. “Women have long been intimately connected to electronic music, perhaps because it offered a path outside male-dominated conventional music worlds,” she said. “What has changed is an awareness of women in the field historically as well as a huge influx of contemporary talent.”

Moogfest Shines a Spotlight on Female, Nonbinary and Transgender Musicians

To that I’d add that it’s worth noting that the “influx” and “contemporary” parts are also closely tied to international artists. Our own CDM contributor will have a conversation with a fellow Romanian woman in the Bucharest scene for one link to that; I’ve also had conversations recently with a some Iranian artists about the situation for women making music there (and the resulting international scene as they travel), and … well, look down the list of countries below.

Moor Mother, the ground-breaking experimental project of Philadelphia’s Camae Ayewa, is one of many people deserving of first-wave headliner recognition – and now getting it.

We’ll have some interviews with artists shortly, so Moogfest’s lineup is your gain, wherever you are.

To watch the livestream:

You can watch from anywhere beginning at 12pm ET on Wednesday December 6 until 2pm ET on Friday December 8.
http://AlwaysOn.Live

Or watch here:

I’m also cross-posting to our CDM Facebook page.

The beginning is – starting very radical, in a nice way! Unfortunately, upstream bandwidth / encoding looks … very choppy. Hoping some of the artists sort that out better. (This is a real roadblock of livestreaming, but that’s a topic for another time.)

Livestream artists:

Admina
(Bucharest, Romania)
Adriana T
(Athens, GA, USA)
Alissa Derubeis
(Asheville, NC, USA)
Amy Knoles
(Valencia, CA, USA)
Ana Paula Santana
(Guadalajara, Mexico)
Andrea Alvarez
(Buenos Aires, Argentina)
Annie Hart
(Brooklyn, NY, USA)
Awaymsg
(Durham, NC, USA)
Aseul
(Seoul, South Korea)
Bells Roar
(Albany, NY, USA)
Caz9
(Dublin, Ireland)
Club Chai (8ULENTINA & FOOZOOL)
(Bay Area, CA, USA)
Despicable Zee
(Oxford, UK)
DJ Haram
(Philadelphia, PA, USA)
Dot
(Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Ela Minus
(Bogota, Columbia)
Elles
(London, UK, USA)
Emily Wells
(New York, NY, USA)
Fari B
(London, UK)
FOSIL
(Chile, Santiago)
Galcid
(Tokyo, Japan)
Jil Christensen
(Durham, NC, USA)
KALONICA NICX
(Bandung, Indonesia)
Kandere
(Melbourne, Australia)
Katie Gately
(Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Kim Ki O
(Istanbul, Turkey)
Lauren Flax
(New York, NY, USA)
Lilith Ai
(London, UK)
Lucy Cliche
(Sydney, Australia)
Lya “Drummer”
(London, UK)
Madame Gandhi
(New Delhi, India)
Mileece
(Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Moor Mother
(Philadelphia, PA, USA)
Nazira
(Almaty, Khazakhstan)
Nesa Azadikhah
(Tehran, Iran)
Nicola Kuperus
(Detroit, MI, USA)
Nonku Phiri
(Johannesburg, South Africa)
OG Lullabies
(Washington, DC, USA)
OTOMO X (Fay Milton & Ayse Hassan)
(London, UK)
PlayPlay
(Durham, NC, USA)
Pulpy Shilpy
(Pune, India)
SARANA
(Samarinda, East Borneo)
Sassy Black
(Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Stud1nt
(Asheville, NC, USA)
Sui Zhen
(Melbourne, Australia)
Suzanne Ciani & Layne
(Bolinas, CA, USA)
Suzi Analogue
(Miami, FL, USA)
Therese Workman
(New York, NY, USA)
Vessel Skirt
(Hobart, Tasmania)
Zensofly
(Durham, NC, USA)

Of course, even better than live streaming is – being there in person. (No buffering issues! Or… if there are, seek medical attention!)

Here’s the first-wave lineup announcement, including a couple of friends (and a couple of idols)!

Amber Mark
Annie Hart
Armen Ra
Aurora Halal
Bonaventure
Carla Dal Forno
CEP (Caroline Polachek)
Caterina Barbieri
DJ HARAM
Ellen Allien
Emily Sprague
Fatima Al Qadiri
Fawkes
Gavin Rayna Russom
Helen Money
Honey Dijon
Jamila Woods
Jenny Hval
Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith
Karyyn
Katie Gately
Kristin Kontrol
Kyoka
Lawrence Rothman
Madame Gandhi
Maliibu Miitch
Midori Takada
Nadia Sirota
Nicole Mitchell
Noncompliant
Pamelia Stickney
Sassy Black
Shanti Celeste
SOPHIE
Stud1nt
Umfang
Upper Glossa

The post Watch Moogfest kick off with epic 50-hour livestream, lineup – minus men appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

A New Norient Is in the Fabric

Delivered... norient | Events,Scene | Fri 1 Dec 2017 2:11 pm

We have decided to skip the next Musikfilm Festival in January 2018. But a lot of interesting work is going on in the background. Read here a short statement from the Norient editorial board about the cancelation (deutsche Version hier). The next festival edition will take place between January 10 and 13 2019. If you want to submit your film to the festival crew, you can already do that via email.

It was a tough decision. When our website crashed last year, we realised how fragile our system is. Norient is composed of a very small team, but is supplied and energized by a huge network of musicians, journalists, bloggers, filmmakers, artists and scholars from around the world.

In these turbulent times, the Norient crew want to strengthen our precious network and improve the quality of our work. We want to make space for innovation and creativity. And we want to continue looking for exciting music, sounds and noises around the globe. To be able to do that, we need time. Time for research, and time for exchange, from Durban to Karachi. If we want to survive into the future, we need to strengthen our basis.

These are the tasks we set ourselves for the coming months. We’re working on a new Norient, and we’re looking forward to presenting it to you in the course of the next year. Fresh and transformed, Norient will host the 9th Musikfilm Festival in January 2019. Save the date! January 10-13 2019.

You’ll be hearing from us. And you’ll see us again, in our new look and in our old location at Reitschule Kino in Bern. And probably also in Lausanne and St. Gallen. Let us know what you think! We’re looking forward to seing you soon!

Norient wird das Musikfilm Festival im Januar 2018 aussetzen. Dieser Entscheid ist uns nicht leicht gefallen. Der kurzzeitige Absturz unserer Webseite im vergangenen Jahr führte uns vor Augen, wie fragil unser System ist. Norient besteht aus einem sehr kleinen Team, wird aber aus einem riesigen Netzwerk von Musikern, Journalistinnen, Bloggern, Filmemacherinnen, Künstlern und Forscherinnen aus der ganzen Welt gespeist.

Das Norient-Team will sein wertvolles Netzwerk in diesen turbulenten Zeiten stärken und die Qualität seiner Arbeit erhalten – und vor allem auch verbessern. Wir wollen Innovation zulassen, Raum für Kreativität schaffen und weiterhin in der Lage sein, spannende Musik, Klänge und Lärm auf dem Globus aufzuspüren. Dazu braucht es Zeit für Recherche, Zeit für den direkten Austausch von Durban bis Karachi. Damit wir auch in der Zukunft bestehen können, müssen wir unser Fundament stärken.

Diesen Aufgaben werden wir uns in den nächsten Monaten widmen. Hinter den Kulissen arbeiten wir intensiv am neuen Norient, den wir euch im kommenden Jahr präsentieren wollen. Frisch und transformiert, wird Norient das 9. Musikfilm Festival im Januar 2019 souverän stemmen. Die Daten für eure Agenda: 10. bis 13. Januar 2019.

Ihr werdet also von uns hören, im neuen Kleid, an gewohnter Stelle, im Kino der Reitschule Bern und wahrscheinlich auch wieder in Lausanne und St. Gallen. Wir sind gespannt auf eure Reaktionen und freuen uns auf euch!

Check out some loving synth images and inspiration from Moscow

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Fri 6 Oct 2017 4:13 pm

Even as rave culture faces new hurdles in Russia, nerd culture thrives. That was the feeling at August’s Synthposium in Moscow; here’s another look.

For an impressionistic feeling of the space station adoration of electronic sound production, here’s a montage shot inside the Expo, which somehow captures the milieu of the event and passion of its attendees.

Apart from space exploration, Russia has its roots in rigor both engineering and compositional, as nicely embodied by Synthposium artist Alex Pleninger. An interview (English subtitled) takes you inside his world, and an adeptness for machines then led him to the classic Buchla modular from … a Nintendo Game Boy. (Love that lofi camera.)

Lest you think Russia is all synth noodling, freestyling (seriously) was a lot of what I heard. Hip hop seems to be resurgent in the Russian capital. (Fight the powers that be?)

We also get fresh views of the gear.

Builder Vyacheslav Grigoriev was there representing VG-Line; here’s a look inside his workshop:

Vyacheslav Grigoriev, the founder of the VG-Line workshop and production, is Moscow’s chief man when it comes to repairing and modifying synthesizers. An expert in Soviet electronics, Vyacheslav is known for his modified and upgraded version of the cult RITM-2 synthesizer, as well as the TR-909-inspired desktop bass drum module, that goes far beyond the original. His workshop is a unique enterprise with a DIY attitude, that denies any corporate classification, where he repairs and manufactures synthesizers of different designs and basically lives. Grigoriev will join the Expo section and present his newly-engineered products at the Vintage Hall on August 26 and 27.

As we were wandering the expo floor, manufacturers were queued up to demo their gear in a convenient light box a series called Things had set up. Here’s a look at the (mostly) Russian entries – starting with VG-Line:

https://thngs.co/things/10267

The VG Line bass drum BD 9Q9. Totally analogue clone of legendary Roland TR-909 kick with wide range of settings, which original TR 909 doesn’t have — a switcher to extend decay and the pitch.

https://thngs.co/things/10257

https://thngs.co/things/10256

35 years after the release of the first model, the creator of Polivoks, Vladimir Kuzmin, decided to release an updated version, which already fell into the hands of many lucky people and, judging by the existing reviews, the legend has already returned. In the work on a modern embodiment, engineers Alex Pleninger and Alexey Taber took part. At the moment there are only 100 copies of the new Polivox and each of them is collected manually.

https://thngs.co/things/10279

You’ve seen Roland’s kit a lot lately, but for one international input, let’s add a Czech input – especially as Bastl’s Thyme just became available for preoder:

The Thyme is an effects processor that is best described as a sequenceable robot operated digital tape machine. With a lot of parameters at hand it enables the exploration of all the time based effects and the vast space in between their classical multi-effects categories (delay, phaser, reverb, chorus, pitch shifter, multi-tap delay, tape delay, tremolo, vibrato, compressor) and in stereo! Each of the 9 different parameters (Tape Speed, Delay Coarse & Fine, Feedback, Filter, extra heads Spacing and Levels, Dry Wet Mix and Volume) has a dedicated, very flexible modulation source – called the Robot – which can be phased out differently for left and right channel to create psychedelic new sound effects.

https://thngs.co/things/10260

and SoftPop, for that matter:

SoftPop is a playfully organic, semi-modular light and sound synthesizer with wide variety of sounds: from random dripping water pops to heavy subtractive basslines. Its fully analog core consisting of a heavily feedbacked system of dual triangle-core oscillators, state variable filter and sample and hold is played through an intuitive interface of 6 faders that provide countless combinations which can be explored by anyone.

https://thngs.co/things/10262

The Pribore MDP101 Baby connects to a computer or a phone via bluetooth, defined as a MIDI device. It has 2 assignable control knobs (Rotary Knob CC), 2 assignable keys (Button CC), 5 transport keys (Rewind, Stop, Play, Record, Loop), 1 angular acceleration sensor (accelerometer), for capturing emotions and expression (Motion Sensor), 1 battery for stand-alone operation, and a USB port for charging and connecting as a usb-midi device.

https://thngs.co/things/10263

From Playtronica came some of the more experimental, DIY / physical computing-tilted entries:

https://thngs.co/things/10205

Touch Me is a HCI device that turns human touch into music.
When the surface area or intensity of skin contact between two or more people changes Touch Me modifies sound output according to selected scale and tone parameters.

https://thngs.co/things/9879

And yes, for when you win the lottery / sell your startup / swap bodies with Trent Reznor or deadmau5 or Hans Zimmer (Freaky Friday!), it’s the Deckard’s Dream! That beats Blade Runner tickets:

The post Check out some loving synth images and inspiration from Moscow appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Future Sound of Pop Music

Delivered... norient | Events,Scene | Wed 27 Sep 2017 3:41 pm

The significance of individual sounds – their origins, their development, and their future – has until now rarely been an object of research in popular music. This symposium will discuss how the sound aesthetic of popular music has changed over the past decades. It will debate how sounds have been created, how they are employed, and how they are constantly being renewed and replaced by new sounds. The symposium will take place in Bern, Switzerland from November 30 to December 2, 2017. See conference homepage for more details here.

Symposium «The Future Sounds of Pop» 2017 – Poster Photo

The symposium will discuss the future of sounds in pop music by addressing the following questions:
– How are sounds modified, manipulated and transformed today?
– How will this be done in the future?
– What role do new interfaces and controllers play in the development of new sounds?
– What do current sound generators offer?
– What new sound generators might we expect in the future?
– How will pop music sound, 10 or 20 years from now?

Keynote Speakers

John Chowning (San Francisco)
Lippold Haken (Illinois)
Edmund Eagan (Ottawa)
Wayne Marshall (Boston)
Bruno Spoerri (Zurich)
Annie Goh (London)
Marie Thompson (Lincoln)
Katia Isakoff (London)

See abstracts and bios here.

Subject

Further papers have been chosen from call for abstracts in the following subject fields:

1. Technological Aspects
The development of new synthesis procedures, editors, controllers and management software for auditory events seems to have reached a point at which the possible fields of application in music have been optimised and are both highly developed and user-friendly. Music technologies are future-oriented, but also process and transform past accomplishments. We wish to determine what virtual settings can offer, both within DAW systems and outside them. More and more developers and users are turning to physical systems (especially modular systems) that offer a great degree of openness and haptic characteristics. We aim to discuss this field of development.

2. Socio-cultural Aspects
Innovations in music technology and the renewal and expansion of sounds have often taken place in experimental settings or through unconventional approaches adopted by those involved. We can often observe that new sounds develop in subcultures and are later adopted by the mainstream. What is the approach of those who develop, use and consume these sounds? What networks exist and emerge around the idea of a new sound? Do small teams of developers determine what happens? In what environments do sonic innovations occur? And what are the impact and significance of specific sounds in different social and cultural contexts?

3. Sound aesthetic Aspects
Innovative sounds that are used excessively in the mainstream for aesthetic or commercial reasons can divide the production and listening communities. Current preferences such as auto-tune, filtering, sidechain compression, stutter effects and bandstop effects are omnipresent but are not necessarily new, nor even genuine pop sounds. How are «new» sounds perceived and evaluated? How do individual sounds change the overall aesthetic of pop songs?

Programme

Thursday, November 30, 2017

12.00 Registration
13.00 Welcome

Panel 1 – Sounds I (Chair: Immanuel Brockhaus/Thomas Burkhalter)
13.15 Bruno Spoerri (Zurich)
Keynote: The Promised Land of New Sounds – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
14.00 Peter Kraut (Bern)
Sounds und Standards – ein schwieriges Verhältnis
14.30 Michael Harenberg/Daniel Weissberg (Bern)
Are sounds just sounds or are they Beethoven?

Panel 2 – Sounds II (Chair: Immanuel Brockhaus/Thomas Burkhalter)
15.30 Katia Isakoff (London)
Keynote: Creating a Musical Use for Electricity (A Romance Novel)
16.30 Robert Michler (Bern)
Erweiterte Soundästhetik der rhythmischen Elemente im Groove der Popmusik
17.00 Benoît Piccand/Jürgen Strauss/Gaël Martinet (Bern)
3D audio. Pop und Raum – vom Tonstudio bis in die Hosentasche

Friday, December 1, 2017

Panel 3 – Aesthetics (Chair: Anja Brunner)
9.30 John Chowning (San Francisco)
Keynote: FM Synthesis – Fifty Years
10.30 Heiko Wandler (Karlsruhe)
Der Einfluss der Synthesizer auf die Ästhetik der elektronischen Klubmusik
11.30 Christofer Jost (Freiburg/Basel)
Weite, Fülle, Präzision. Über die Klangästhetik des Gitarren-Delays und dessen Bedeutung in gegenwärtiger Popmusik
12.00 Christina M. Heinen (Oldenburg)
«Music of Black Holes and Sounds from Space». LIGO sonification and their Creative Side-Effects
12.30 Christophe Fellay (Sion/London)
Rhythm and Noise

Panel 4 – Technology (Chair: Immanuel Brockhaus/Thomas Burkhalter)
14:30 Jan Herbst (Bielefeld)
Old sounds with new technologies? Examining the creative potential of guitar «profiling» technology from a production perspective
15.00 Jack Davenport (Lancashire)
Playful Musical Interfaces. Introducing the «Sound of Colour»
15.30 Werner Jauk (Graz)
Forward Back … Sound-Gesture-Technologies. The Im-Mediate Bodily Shaping of Immaterial Sound & Sonic Pop-Culture
16.30 Fereydoun Pelarek (Sydney)
Sound Design Techniques of the Live Looping Performance Artist
17.00 Lippold Haken (Illinois) / Edmund Eagan (Ottawa)
Keynote: Finger Control of Timbre throughout Each Note. Challenges for New Controllers and New Sound Generators

20.00 Haken Continuum – Workshop Lippold Haken/Edmund Eagan
A New Paradigm for Timbre Control. Finger-Influenced Patching in the EaganMatrix

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Panel 5 – Philosophy & Sociology (Chair: Britta Sweers)
9.30 Wayne Marshall (Boston)
Keynote: From Breakbeats to Fruity Loops. Small Sounds and Scenes in the Age of the DAW
10.30 Robin James (Charlotte)
Novelty, Speculation, Wake. How Pop Music Conceives of «the Future» (1983–2017)
11.30 Georgi Georgiev (Berlin)
The Future of Techno
12.00 Marie Thompson (Lincoln)
Keynote: The (Feminized) Noise of Pop

Panel 6 – Reception & Sociology (Chair: Britta Sweers)
14.30 Hannes Liechti (Bern)
Rattling Chains and Cackling Chickens. Non-Musical Sampling in Experimental Electronic Pop
15.00 Holger Lund (Ravensburg)
The Master’s Master? Neue Soundästhetiken durch post-produktives Mastering und Vinylcut

Panel 7 – Virtuality (Chair: Immanuel Brockhaus/Thomas Burkhalter)
16.00 Annie Goh (London)
Keynote: Sounding Cyber*feminist Futures. Speculations on Sonic Unknowns
17.00 Ruben Brockhaus/Studygroup HTW Berlin (Berlin)
V-Age, Alterungsprozesse bei virtuellen Instrumenten
17.30 Marie-Kristin Meier (Berlin)
Immersion als ästhetische Strategie in Virtual Reality Experiences und elektronischer Musik

Organisation

Immanuel Brockhaus and Thomas Burkhalter, HKB (lead)
Assistants: Sabine Jud and Daniel Allenbach

This symposium is part of the HKB research project Cult Sounds (see Norient dossier here) of Immanuel Brockhaus and Thomas Burkhalter (Norient), which is supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation.

Partner

Chicago’s Knobcon is where gear makers converge to show their wares

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Tue 22 Aug 2017 12:54 am

We’ve come full circle: the informal meetup seems to be eclipsing big trade shows. And for modular and boutique makers, KnobCon is now an American mainstay.

We saw Russia’s upcoming Synthposium. Moscow is as much music festival as it is gear conference. KnobCon in Chicago is mostly just gear – mentions of performances double as demos, and even the Friday party promises “gear-centric performances.”

With the ever-growing cadre of small modular makers in the USA, though, Chicago’s KnobCon is looking like the one place everyone will come together. A handful of bigger manufacturers (Roland, Yamaha, Elektron) join a mostly-boutique lineup – and Doepfer from Germany, who started the whole Eurorack thing.

Tom Oberheim, who’s gone from being historical legend to modern-day gear rockstar, will “headline” the event with a keynote. Maybe the most interesting feature is the Demo Derby. Sign up for dedicated time slots on a system, with the venue open to people bringing their own studio setups. (It’s a bit like a model train meetup – you can create any modular setup you like, in a defined area.)

Here’s the full lineup of gear makers:

1010music LLC
4ms Company
Amplified Parts
Art For The Ears
Arturia
Audioutlaw
Audulus LLC
Blue Lantern Modules
Catalyst Audio
Chase Bliss Audio
Conductive Labs
Copper Traces
Couture Voltage
Dave Smith Instruments
Delptronics
Detachment 3
Division 6
Doctor Synth’s World of ROMplers
DOEPFER Musikelektronik
Dwarfcraft Devices
Elektron
Elite Modular
Erogenous Tones
Etherealsun
Family Room Recordings
Five12 Inc
Future Retro
Great Lakes Modular
Grove Audio
Hammond
Industrial Music Electronics
Isla Instruments
JMLS – Logan Soloman Synth Research
Korg
KVgear
Landscape
Make Noise
Metalphoto of Cincinnati
Michigan Synth Works
Modular Addict
Mystic Circuits
Nerd Audio
Noise Engineering
Novation
omiindustriies
Rabid Elephant
Roland
Schlappi Engineering
SDIY Chicago
STG Soundlabs
Syinsi
Synth City
synthCube
Synthesis Technology
Synthrotek
SysEx Dumpster
Tascam
TipTop Audio
Universal Audio
VCV
Yamaha
Zetaohm
ZORX

More:
https://knobcon.com/

The post Chicago’s Knobcon is where gear makers converge to show their wares appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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