Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Scene


Maracaibo to Berlin, Hyperaktivist on MESS, love, and music community

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 25 May 2018 4:36 pm

From Venezuela to Europe, DJ/producer Hyperaktivist’s passion for music has been about connecting people as it has about connecting music. She talks to us about that process of community building, even in the face of resistance – and shares hours of music mixed with Mohajer at her side.

MESS is “Mindful Electronic Sonic Selections.” It’s advertised as techno, as house, as “adventurous sounds.” The party itself is once every third month at Ohm, the intimate club built in the former battery room of the power plant that now houses Tresor and Atonal Festival. But follow the connections of this party, and you get a decent map to a range of inspiring DIY, collective efforts of artists around Europe and Latin America. For any of us struggling to put together our own musical lives, our own parties, our own collectives and communities, it’s a terrific instructive effort – not least because of the personality and will of Hyperaktivist, aka Maracaibo, Venezuela-born, Berlin-based Ana Laura Rincon.

I’m personally indebted to Ana Laura in the time I’ve known her, in that in a sometimes mercurial, transient Berlin scene, she has consistently been someone whose vision and friendship I’ve known I could always trust. Of course, maybe it’s better though to first listen to how she communicates musically. She shares with us a mix she made B2B with Mohajer (aka Melinda Mohajer), her Iranian-born partner.

The magical thing about music and perhaps specifically techno is, when someone makes a confident sonic statement, it makes that feeling of strength infectious:

Hyperaktivist went B2B with Mohajer for MESS in February – a perfect Valentine’s Day pairing. Listen to their full mix. Photo courtesy Ana Laura Rincon.

The Hyperaktivist B2B Mohajer set comes to us from the last edition, in February. MESS is never advertised as female-only lineups; it’s a completely mixed crowd, and it never uses artists’ gender as a selling point. For her part, Ana Laura just refers to “chemistry and style.” But the fact remains: some of the most significant forces on the musical scene are female, transgender, and non-binary. And a lot of those figures are still often very underground. So let’s let Ana Laura guide us.

For the edition coming up on Berlin Saturday May 26, we get to meet two special artists:

Nastya Muravyova (Celestial, Kyiv)

“She’s a rising, yet brightly shining star of Kyiv’s underground scene,” Ana Laura says. “She’s balancing on the edge of pumpy 4×4 techno and sharp breakbeat, slightly aggressive — and all the way sexy.”

facebook.com/vsehzhdetsmert

Jessie Granqvist (Esperanto, Stockholm)

Ana Laura: “She’s a product of the vibrant underground-scene that’s currently growing rapidly in Stockholm. With roots grounded in illegal raves and open airs, she has gained notoriety for her style of dark and meditative sounds merged together into a very danceable mix. With both technicality and an eclectic selection of records, she has the talent to truly build and build a long lasting vibe on every floor that she appears on.”

facebook.com/jessie.granqvist/

PK: I find it interesting that you’re pulling people connected to collectives, parties, scenes in other cities. What’s important to you about doing that?

Hyperaktivist: For me, at the moment, I’m really not finding my inspiration so much from the scene in Berlin. So I always try to invite and collaborate with people from other places – so we can experience something fresh and different for us here in Berlin. With bookings, I take my time to know that everyone is going to have a chemistry that will work through the night and that it will add something new.

I mean, it seems like that’s been a big part of what defined the scene in Berlin – bringing in influence from elsewhere, whether it’s Detroit or Latin America or another part of Germany. So that’s a problem if it becomes just an export culture, if it’s all the same, right?

Hype has taken over Berlin; that’s a fact. People come here to live that “Berlin experience.” What scares me is the effect this might have on some of the artists that reside in Berlin. I worry some DJs feel pressured to play what’s expected from them more than what they feel at the time. And I worry about the consequences of that for the people who actually live in Berlin – whether they’re feeling that they’re going to the same party over and over, or that there are actually new things happening.

At this point I’m trying to go back to the roots a bit, thinking about why I started DJing and organizing parties in the first place. For me it all started in Venezuela, a country with few electronic music affiliations.

I discovered the electronic music scene when I was about 16 or 17. That happened to be around the first time I saw a DJ playing – there were maybe three or four people in my whole city who owned turntables.

It might sound funny, but for me it was a revelation. I knew right there, this is something I wanted to do. I was collecting music already; my mom had a great music collection and she was among other things a radio host. I was already completely fascinated about music and how we needed it to express ourselves and how we naturally feel like sharing it with others. So for me, seeing a DJ – “the master of ceremony” – was a turning point.

I started to get into it, but the scene was small and many people wouldn’t really have access to it. I first started organizing parties and eventually I even opened the first club in my city dedicated to electronic music only. I did it with my three best friends; we ran it for four years. During this time, we would also throw free parties in the streets. We had the intention of making electronic music more accessible to anyone and somehow contributing to the development of this scene that had already become a very important, determinant part of my life

That’s why I try to work with collectives that I feel are working to develop the scene in their own countries. When you start to do this in a place that’s not like Berlin, that’s not well developed, where the industry is not like here, you know that people are doing this because they love it. And they love it so much that they need it and if it doesn’t exist, then they do it. They need it to be part of their lives, so they make it happen.

So I like to work with people I feel are involved in music for these reasons, and doing something with heart and that is honest. Not only because of hype or because they want to be famous. It’s more because we fucking love it.

How do you describe what MESS is about? I know you aren’t explicitly talking about this being female + non-binary only, as far as lineups – so how would you express that dimension?

First of all, I feel the concept of MESS is ever-evolving. We need to pay attention to the necessities of the electronic music scene, what needs work and what’s overlooked.

Berlin is such a masculine city in many ways, music scene included. I’ve met some of the most amazing women and the most strong personalities in Berlin. So I have a hard time accepting why women still need to fight very hard and prove themselves over and over in order to be accepted and sometimes even welcomed.

I think about MESS as a space where I don’t want to make a political statement. I have come to understand the best points are made when you don’t have to explain too much but instead you let things speak by themselves. Actions speak louder than words, right?

So I put together bookings based on chemistry and style. I invite super talented artists and I let them do their thing. And slowly but surely, people are realizing that there’s something different. And I get feedback on it – sometimes at the party, people come to me and say, like, ‘this is really cool, what you’re doing, there’s something different about the party.’ So it’s great to let people see by themselves.

I also always try to put together bookings where people are from diverse cultural backgrounds, so you see different approaches.

In my utopian world, we shouldn’t even be having these discussions between each other. At the end of the day, more than anything else, it should be about the music, about friendship, acceptance, respect — about the feeling you are part of something special.

And this is what MESS is at the moment.

Ana Laura aka Hyperaktivist. Photo by Melinda Mohajer.

So when you go to find these artists, these collectives and other scenes – how are you connecting with them?

Research. [laughs] I spend time – a lot of time, listening to the music. Not only once. You know how it is with music – this day you hear this and you think, oh wow, I love this … next day you hear the same and it’s like, this is actually fatal. I give myself time to hear it, in different moods, see how I feel about it. I hear it with friends. There are different things that catch me. Usually, the things that catch me are related to attitude — when I see that this person wants to say something, there’s something there.

It takes time. That’s why I do MESS every three months, because I need time to prepare and I also want to have a good reason to make the party. For example, the last edition happened on February 17th, the weekend after Valentine’s Day. We decided to make a “Club Affair” and have only couples playing, as in back to back. So we invited Isabella from Colombia B2B Bella Sarris from Australia, Johanna Schneider with Philippa Pacho from Sweden with their B2B project Sthlm Murder Girls, and I played with Melinda Mohajer from Iran. I saved our recording specially for you at CDM.

Схема. Via Facebook.

Hyperaktivist vs. Maricas Maricas, Barcelona.

I’ve been collaborating with various collectives / parties. For a few examples:

Maricas, a queer party collective from Barcelona, run by Isabella, a Colombian DJ who played at our last edition, along with Uruguayan friends

www.facebook.com/pg/maricasmaricasmaricas
www.instagram.com/maricasmaricas/

Fast Forward from Copenhagen — these guys are making exciting new techno and crazy illegal parties, and you feel their collective really has these family vibe, which I love.

www.facebook.com/fastforwardcopenhagen/

Esperanto music from Sweden – they’re pushing up-and-coming Swedish artists.

https://www.facebook.com/EsperantoMusic/

esperantomusic.net

Cxema from Ukraine, where they are taking abandoned locations and throwing badass raves and putting the Ukraine scene on the international radar.

www.facebook.com/cxemapage/
http://www.c-x-e-m-a.com/

How does that experience compare to when you were running a club in Venezuela?

It was the same – collaborating with the development of the scene and the culture of electronic music. It’s what I’ve been working for, always.

I had this friend, and he had this house downtown in my city Maracaibo, the second largest city in Venezuela. And he was like, ”I want to do something here, what should I do?” I didn’t even think for one second — I turned around and told him, we’re gonna do a club.

And then we started the club, and it was amazing. It became a meeting point for all the scene in the city and across the country. So we started to do the same – invited collectives from Caracas and all the other cities from Venezuela to come to play, and then we would go to play their parties in their cities. And then it grew, and it started to happen between Colombia, Brazil, Argentina. Then we started to bring artists from Europe, but at this point the political situation of the country started to critically worsen. We had an exchange control that started to happen and wouldn’t allow us to access any foreign currency anymore, so buying records, equipment, or making international bookings became impossible. The whole country started to go down down and boom – it was gone. And that’s when we stopped.

But now one of the best clubs in Bogota, Video Club, is run by a good friend of mine Enrique Leon with I used to have the club with in Venezuela. And he’s putting together great bookings, making showcases with everyone. Dekmental Sound System, Aurora Halal, etc….

If you’re in Berlin, don’t miss MESS tomorrow at Ohm, Saturday 26 May. Or see you in the scene in your neck of the woods.

MESS at OHM
Facebook event
Resident Advisor

More from Hyperaktivist / Mess

www.facebook.com/Hyperaktivist/
www.soundcloud.com/hyperaktivist
www.soundcloud.com/messberlin
www.facebook.com/messberlin

At top: Hyperaktivist – Pic by Honza Kolář.

The post Maracaibo to Berlin, Hyperaktivist on MESS, love, and music community appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Contemporary album of the month – Jon Hassell: Listening to Pictures (Pentimento Volume I)

Delivered... John Lewis | Scene | Fri 25 May 2018 8:30 am

Hassell’s ‘fourth world’ fusion of hi-tech minimalism with world rhythms proves the 81-year-old is still experimental after all these years

In the late 70s, long before terms such as “world music” or “cultural appropriation” were in common usage, the trumpeter and composer Jon Hassell devised the term “Fourth World” to describe his music. It explored what he called “primitive futurism”, where shantytown squalor coexisted with hi-tech western studio technology, fusing Hassell’s early minimalist work with Terry Riley and La Monte Young with his studies of Indian, African and Indonesian music.

Brian Eno was an early adopter of Hassell’s aesthetic and, before long, other champions of pan-cultural fusion – David Byrne, Peter Gabriel, David Sylvian, Ry Cooder – were collaborating with Hassell and employing his methodology. As dozens more musicians started plundering exotic global sounds and placing them through electronic filters, Hassell was off exploring other worlds – adding his distinctive trumpet sound for artists as diverse as Björk, Tears for Fears, kd lang and 808 State; flirting with hip-hop and electro; creating “coffee-coloured” classical music with the Senegalese drummer Abdou Mboup; exploring ambient jazz with the likes of Naná Vasconcelos, Jacky Terrasson and Anouar Brahem.

Continue reading...

A Tale About an Utopian World

Delivered... Philipp Rhensius (Norient) | Scene | Fri 25 May 2018 6:00 am

The music of of the electronic musician and singer Aïsha Devi creates a world of unheard sounds and utopian ideas. In a sonic fiction piece, Philipp Rhensius examines the song «Cell Stems Spa» about its ideas for a better 21st century. Aïsha Devi is part of the second edition of «Sonic Fiction: Aïsha Devi – Tim Hecker» on June 9, 2018, at Schauspielhaus Zürich, curated by Norient and Rewire Festival.

Aïsha Devi (Photo © by Emile Barret)

Clubmusic has never been innocent. But today, in a world full of hostile politics, racism and sexism and the 24/7 distribution of its associated images, it is ever more so – and the music of the electronic musician and singer Aïsha Devi is a great example. Her deconstructed club sound is a distorting mirror of the now. It wires up atonal noise with harmonic singing, ecstatic rave idioms with bleak drones and poetic lyrics. In 2015 she released her debut album, Of Matter And Spirit, in collaboration with the Chinese visual artist Tianzhuo Chen and later with the Asian Dope Boys for dance performances. Her new album, DNA Feelings (Houndstooth 2018), is loaded with idiosyncratic and unheard sounds as well as utopian ideas that help to imagine a better 21st century.

Living in an Utopian State

«Cell Stems Spa» has neither a start nor an end: it has always been there. It just waited to be sonified as it has – until now – existed outside of our capacity to perceive: the steady low hum that moves through the air slowly, like a modulated machine or a highway next to where you just woke up. A sound that enters your body, your skin, and your bones until it resonates with you and connects your body to your emotions and your soul to your reason. Then a melody comes along and takes over, played by what could be an amplified synthesizer. It lays the foundation for a human-like voice that is layered with several other, somewhat alien voices, until it becomes a choir. The words are barely understandable, apart from what sounds like «we are» in the beginning of the short vocal fragments. The use of the personal pronoun finally hints at a certain consciousness, one that is in tension, but more in an equilibrium with forms and rhythms. The «we», it turns out, is a collective of organisms that live in a utopian state. Here, they don’t have to be somebody, neither a subject nor an object, they can just be an undefined «we» that is in a state of permanent becoming.

The Story of Unborn Life

Aren’t we, as human beings, at the beginning, when our DNA is still floating in the cosmos, not also all the same? A universal substance without details or determination, a blank paper, an unwritten book that waits to be filled? A free floating bunch of molecules looking for salvation: to finally turn into a living being with a mind and body – and all the invisible tentacles that connect us to other living beings, but also machines, tools, computers, smartphones, and virtual networks. «Cell Stems Spa» tells the story of unborn, but also interconnected life. A universal organism that can just exist, free from any associations or affiliations, but full of potential. It is a tale about a utopian world, where human beings are invited to accept their predetermined reality, and thereby, their relations to other people and other institutions. As the petrification of realities is always dangerous, one should be aware of the fact that we, like stem cells, can transform into everything or everybody we want to. Well, presupposed we allow ourselves to do so, by swimming in this spa called life.

Aïsha Devi will perform at «Sonic Fiction: Aïsha Devi – Tim Hecker» on June 9, 2018, as part of the concert series «Sonic Fiction: Concerts and Audiovisual Performances that Shape the Future» at Schauspielhaus Zürich, curated by Norient and Rewire Festival.

Read More on Norient

> Thomas Burkhalter, Simon Grab und Michael Spahr: «Tanzende Staubpartikel»
> Adam Harper: «Sound Creates Reality: Sonic Fiction»
> Norient: «A New Series Is Born: Sonic Fiction»

Unreal game engine’s modular sound features explained: video

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 8:47 pm

Unreal Engine may be built for games, but under the hood, it’s got a powerful audio, music, and modular synthesis engine. Its lead audio programmer explained this afternoon in a livestream from HQ.

Now a little history: back when I first met Aaron McLeran, he was at EA and working with Brian Eno and company on Spore. Generative music in games and dreams of real interactive audio engines to drive it have some history. As it happens, those conversations indirectly led us to create libpd. But that’s another story.

Aaron has led an effort to build real synthesis capabilities into Unreal. That could open a new generation of music and sound for games, enabling scores that are more responsive to action and scale better to immersive environments (including VR and AR). And it could mean that Unreal itself becomes a tool for art, even without a game per se, by giving creators access to a set of tools that handle a range of 3D visual and sound capabilities, plus live, responsive sound and music structures, on the cheap. (Getting started with Unreal is free.)

I’ll write about this more soon, but here’s what they cover in the video:

  • Submix graph and source rendering (that’s how your audio bits get mixed together)
  • Effects processing
  • Realtime synthesis (which is itself a modular environment)
  • Plugin extensions

Aaron is joined by Community Managers Tim Slager and Amanda Bott.

I’m just going to put this out there —

— and let you ask CDM some questions. (Or let us know if you’re using Unreal in your own work, as an artist, or as a sound designer or composer for games!)

Forum topic with the stream:

Unreal Engine Livestream – Unreal Audio: Features and Architecture – May 24 – Live from Epic HQ

The post Unreal game engine’s modular sound features explained: video appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Cram Commodore 64 speech synthesis into your rack with this firmware

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 5:25 pm

The open hardware Braids macro oscillator gets an alternative firmware that brings new features – including a speech engine known from the Commodore 64 days. Speech synth means modular synthesis:

Mutable Instruments’ open, digital modules have been one of the best things about the modern modular revolution. And this alternative firmware is a great example of that. Without removing any of the existing Braids 1.9 features, you get new oscillator powers.

The banner feature here is the robotic text-to-speech engine SAM (Software Automated Mouth), known from the Commodore 64. Here’s that engine in action – glitchy and distinctive:

Naturally, that opens up some wild possibilities once you patch into it in a modular environment. Listen to this firmware demo for an idea:

It’s also very fun how this works:

There are three SAM entries in the oscillator model list, named SAM1 to SAM3. Each of these SAM models contain 16 different words.

SAM is configured to work similarly to a granular sampler. By changing Timbre, you “scrub” through the word selected by Color. With Timbre at 0 position, SAM is playing the first grain of the current word. With Timbre fully clockwise, SAM is playing the last grain of the current word. The speed of an envelope can control how fast SAM says the word, independent of the pitch.

If you send SAM a trigger it will automatically play the word, starting from the current grain, at the “natural” speed of the word. In this situation, the pitch input controls both the speed and pitch of the output.

It’s not all that’s on offer, though. You also get six oscillators, evenly spaced:

6xsaw, 6xsquare, 6xtriangle, 6xsine. 6 oscillators starting at the 1v/oct input, spaced evenly across the currently selected quantize scale. Color controls the number of scale steps between oscillators, and Timbre scans through various amplitude settings for the 6 oscillators. When the Braids quantizer is turned off, the oscillators are evenly spaced by semitones (controlled by Color)

There’s already a model of this on VCV Rack, so even if you don’t have the discontinued Braids hardware, it should be possible to use in software. I’ll see about forking it and report back. The Macro Oscillator under Audible Instruments would be the obvious starting place. (Any other Braids fans, other stuff you’d want to see in an ideal fork of the module? Maybe we can make a wishlist. Macro Macro?)

Via Richard Devine.

Here’s the firmware:

https://burns.ca/eurorack.html

The post Cram Commodore 64 speech synthesis into your rack with this firmware appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Elektrofon’s Klang is the gorgeous chord module that looks like the future

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 4:47 pm

Sometimes, tech looks stylish in the way you’d expect it to look on the deck of a starcraft. So if Eurorack makes you think “old-fashioned,” meet the Klang, a chord creation module from Norway.

After years – okay, decades – of noodling about mostly in monophonic space, the modular scene is discovering polyphony. But that generates an interesting compositional question: how do you make chords accessible with the twist of a wrist, with patch cord signal and encoders?

Klang is a kind of dial-a-chord solution: there’s an encoder for each of the four voices in a chord, so to get a four-note chord, you twist four knobs. That’s straightforward enough, but it’s the visualization that gets interesting: there’s a retro-chic clock face on a color display, showing both octave and pitch. And naturally those encoders and the clock face are color coded so you can keep each pitch separate.

What time is it? Chord time. You can store up to 99 of these four-note chords, and step through progressions by button, or trigger or gate signal. Then you output each voice (note) via separate voltage outs.

That’s clever enough, but it’s really the presentation and packaging that make it. It’s probably the prettiest module I’ve ever seen.

Cost: unknown. But a few people did grab (less pretty) videos of it in action at Superbooth in Berlin earlier this month.

The creator has another project in store – the Elektrofon – Campaign case, which promises a “quick disconnect” system. Looks like a nice way to store your modules in the studio, then disconnect to put in a live/flight case.

Rune Warhuus is the creator of this module. Please do follow him to encourage him to make more gear like this and post more gear pr0n. Thank you.

https://www.instagram.com/elektrofon/

Details of this module – currently the only one detailed so far under the Elektrofon moniker – at the manufacturer site:

http://elektrofon.no/

And of course you’ll find this on MODULARgrid.

Thanks, Lisa / Noncompliant, for the tip.

The post Elektrofon’s Klang is the gorgeous chord module that looks like the future appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FCC Denies LPFM Advocate’s Petition for Reconsideration of Changes in Rules for Location of FM Translators for AM Stations – Not a Resolution of Informal Objections Against Translator Applications

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 4:07 pm

Earlier this week, the full FCC issued a decision denying a Petition for Reconsideration of the FCC’s 2017 decision to relax the rules on the permissible locations of FM translators for AM stations, allowing them to locate anywhere within the greater of the AM station’s 2 mv/m contour or a circle with a 25 mile radius from the AM station’s transmitter site. The rule had previously required that translators be located within the lesser of those two limiting factors. See our summary of that decision here. As we wrote here and here, Prometheus Radio Project, an LPFM advocacy group, had petitioned for reconsideration of that rule change and asked for a stay of its effect, arguing that the change would impact the area in which LPFM stations could locate their stations if a need to change transmitter sites arose. Prometheus also raised procedural objections about the way in which the order was adopted. In this week’s decision, the FCC rejected the Petition for Reconsideration, finding that it was properly adopted, and that Prometheus had not demonstrated that the change in the area in which translators could be located would have a significant impact on LPFM site availability. The Commission came to the same conclusion that we did in our articles on the Prometheus petition, that the change in the area to locate did not necessarily have an impact on LPFM site availability – as translators could just as well move further from LPFM sites as they could move closer.

This decision was one that addressed pleadings filed back in 2017. Several broadcast trade press articles suggested that this decision was one resolving an Informal Objection filed last week by Prometheus and other LPFM advocacy groups against almost a thousand pending translator applications – both applications filed in the latest FM translator window for AM stations and other minor change applications filed by existing translator operators. While that Informal Objection raised many of the same arguments that had been raised in the 2017 Petition for Reconsideration (and in fact cited to the pendency of that Petition as one of the reasons to deny the pending translator applications), it is a different pleading that has not yet been resolved by the FCC. As the issues are similar, one would expect a similar result – but broadcasters who received the Informal Objection should not start celebrating yet. This week’s decision was certainly good news – but it has not resolved all the issues raised by the LPFM advocates.

Chvrches: Love Is Dead review – pop rabble-rousers pull their political punches

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 12:00 pm

Lauren Mayberry’s vocals are strident and there are some brilliantly desolate ballads on the synthpop band’s third album – but a big single still eludes them

As a recent Observer profile noted, Chvrches’ career has a “strange trajectory”. The Scottish trio are a pop band who have achieved fame on both sides of the Atlantic through relentless touring, but who have never had a hit single. No shame in that, but it’s something their third album clearly seeks to rectify. The band themselves have shushed such an idea – “we aren’t really playing that game” – but frankly, you don’t call on producers Greg Kurstin and Steve Mac, the people behind Adele’s Hello and Clean Bandit’s Rockabye respectively, if you’re planning on making a 21st-century cross between the Faust Tapes and Diamanda Galás’s The Litanies of Satan.

Related: Chvrches: ‘It only takes two seconds to say: I don’t agree with white supremacy’

Continue reading...

A sky full of stars – The Hindu

Delivered... "Indian Electronic Music" - Google News | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 11:42 am

The Hindu

A sky full of stars
The Hindu
One of the few musicians to have played alongside Indian producer and proclaimed father of acid house, Charanjit Singh in Antwerp in 2012, Christelle is keen on interacting with Indian electronic music fans and artistes. “I often listen to ragas and I ...

The 24 European Techno Festivals That You Should Go To This Summer

Delivered... By EB Staff | Scene | Thu 24 May 2018 10:29 am

The post The 24 European Techno Festivals That You Should Go To This Summer appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

VCV Rack modular is about to get gamepad support

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 4:14 pm

Computer or Eurorack, you still want to get those grubby hands on your sounds. So the latest update to the free and open modular platform Rack makes that cheap and easy, with gamepad support.

Developer Andrew Belt is clearly a busy man. His latest update maps from gamepads to virtual voltage inside the software modular environment. Watch via this — uh gentle ambient demo?

Anrew explains on Facebook:

Just added gamepad and computer keyboard support to VCV Rack, soon to be released in Rack 0.6.1.

Joysticks are mapped to voltages -10 to 10V for each axis using the MIDI-CC module from Core with the new “Gamepad” MIDI driver. Buttons can be converted to 10V gates using MIDI-Trig. Similarly to actual MIDI controllers, click the CC or note name display to learn/assign a gamepad joystick/button.

“But I don’t have a USB gamepad controller!”

They’re super cheap on eBay or Amazon by searching “usb gamepad” for around $10. Compare that with $300 MIDI controllers, and this is more fun per dollar if you’re on a budget (so you can save your money for the next upcoming VCV module!)

The “Computer Keyboard” driver supports the QWERTY US layout and spans two octaves with octave up/down buttons.

This update also adds the ability to use the same MIDI device on Windows with multiple virtual MIDI modules. Previously this was caused by the Windows MIDI API requiring exclusive access to each MIDI device, so having multiple instances would crash. I have written a MIDI “multiplexer” that solves this.

Good stuff. I can also imagine an ultra-portable sound rig with a compact PC and a gamepad and keyboard attached – running Linux, of course.

More:
http://vcvrack.com/

Speaking of Linux, until there’s native support in JACK at some point, hopefully, there’s already a hack for the best audio system on Linux (and the best way of piping sound between software):

https://gitlab.com/sonusdept/hijack

Oh yeah, and while VCV Rack is free (with inexpensive software add-ons for high-quality modules), there is this problem – it could make you buy hardware.

The post VCV Rack modular is about to get gamepad support appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Get a powerful spectral delay, free, in MSpectralDelay plug-in

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 3:29 pm

What makes a delay more interesting? A delay that’s combined with spectral controls. What makes that better? Getting it for free. MSpectralDelay is here – and looks like a must-download.

It’s been a while – I’m sure I’m not alone in missing Native Instruments’ Spektral Delay, discontinued some years back. MSpectralDelay is a different animal – NI’s offering had a whopping 160 bands, whereas this has just six – but you do get a powerful, musical interface that lets you treat delays in a different way.

The idea is this: divide up your sound by frequency, with one to six bands, then add the delay effect with tempo sync and apply modulation.

What the developers Melda have done that set their offering apart is to provide really precise parameter controls with clear visual feedback, MIDI control of everything, and clever features like automatic gain compensation and a “safety” limiter to prevent you from overdriving the results.

Also surprising: not only is there mid/side processing, but you can set up to eight channels of surround, offering some spatial applications.

Melda plugins also feature some nice standard features like modulators with time signatures, morphing and preset recall, different channel modes, and more.

Full feature list from the devs:

The most advanced user interface on the market – stylable, resizable, GPU accelerated
Dual user interface, easy screen for beginners, edit screen for professionals
Unique visualisation engine with classic meters and time graphs
1-6 fully configurable independent bands
Modulators
Adjustable oscillator shape technology
Multiparameters
M/S, single channel, up to 8 channels surround processing…
Smart randomization
Automatic gain compensation (AGC)
Safety limiter
Adjustable up-sampling 1x-16x
Synchronization to host tempo
MIDI controllers with MIDI learn
64-bit processing and an unlimited sampling rate
Extremely fast, optimized for newest AVX2 capable processors
Global preset management and online preset exchange
Supports VST, VST3, AU and AAX interfaces on Windows & Mac, both 32-bit and 64-bit
No dongle nor internet access is required for activation
Free-for-life updates

There’s also this kind of funny demo video, which first explains why you want a delay, and then – as is custom in our industry – tell you that, naturally, everyone from complete beginners who barely know how to switch on their computer to advanced professionals will be able to have exactly the same experience because presets parameters blah blah.

That said… well, you do need a delay. And this is awesome. And beginners and pros will probably have fun with it. And there are presets. So… fair points, all.

Go grab it:

http://www.meldaproduction.com/MSpectralDelay

via Sonic State

Free download requires registration; the offer ends June 3.

The post Get a powerful spectral delay, free, in MSpectralDelay plug-in appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

8 Tracks That Defined The Soviet Era’s Industrial Scene

Delivered... By Andrew Lee and Jenya Gorbunov | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 10:53 am

The post 8 Tracks That Defined The Soviet Era’s Industrial Scene appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Debate: Archive and Sampling

Delivered... norient | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 6:00 am

Today the copying and sampling of not just sound but of all material from infinite sources challenges the «spectacular aura» of the pre-recorded original in order to claim autonomy. We asked musicians from the Norient network: How Does the Digital Availability of Sources Change Music? A virtual debate from the Norient exhibition Seismographic Sounds (see and order corresponding book here).

Abandoned School Archive (Photo © by publicdomainpictures/Lode Van de Velde, 2018)

Complete Debate: The Video

Quotes

«My sample library is full of glitchy sounds. I started to build it years ago and I’m continuously updating it. It works like this: I make recordings from prepared instruments or amplified objects, or I record jams with digital instruments. Then I work with these sounds, paying close attention to details. I can spend hours designing just one three hundred milliseconds glitch, or I can build a huge wall of sound out of intersecting layers. These layers create beautiful and dense textures that I’m gradually transforming in my software by changing many parameters at each moment. I edit my samples to the point that they gain a totally new identity — all associations are gone and in the end just their aesthetic qualities count. Success is when I can make thousands of variations from a single sample. These sounds define my library. I think that gives a certain stamp to all of my works.»

Svetlana Maraš, composer and sound artist (Serbia)

«I sample my own music. It helps to exaggerate my egomania. By recombining myself my self-referential cosmos grows day by day.»

Christoph Ogiermann, composer, singer, instrumentalist and conductor in the fields of of contemporary music and free improvisation (Germany)

«Everything is a remix.»

Joe Bennett, Popular Music Scholar (Great Britain)

«Art and music in an archive will function like words in our minds. In the near future we will reuse them at will, just like we create sentences.»

Eduardo Navas, Remix Studies Scholar (USA)

Video Debate Credits

Statements by
Eduardo Navas, Remix Studies Scholar (USA)
Joe Bennett, Popular Music Scholar (Great Britain)
Christoph Ogiermann, composer, singer, instrumentalist and conductor in the fields of of contemporary music and free improvisation (Germany)
Garo Gdanian, Metal Musician (Lebanon)
Svetlana Maraš, composer and sound artist (Serbia)

Video Cut: Stephan Hermann, Coupdoeil

Some quotes from this debate were published in the second Norient book Seismographic Sounds. Click on the image to know more.

Read More on Norient

> Eduardo Navas: «Regenerative Culture»
> Hannes Liechti: «Perspectives on Sampling»
> Thomas Burkhalter: «The Sample Shapes the Song»

Debates from Seismographic Sounds

> on Bedroom Producers
> on Power and Positions
> on Music and War

Patterning 2 is coming, and it’s going to be awesome

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 11:30 pm

First Oympia Noise Co brought us Patterning, and we loved it, now they bring us Patterning 2, the next generation of the circular drum machine. With the same intuitive interface that is both easy to use and deep with features for the experienced producer. Patterning 2 is a whole new app and not an update to the existing version. The new app is on pre-order right now for

Here’s what’s new in Patterning 2:

  • Recording Beats & Automation
  • Drum Kit Switching
  • Randomize (Almost) Everything
  • Next Generation Ratcheting
  • Coarse Tune Quantization
  • Quantized Pattern Launch
  • Sample Folders
  • Loop Rotate
  • Pattern Tempo Changes
  • Divide Mode Measure Length
  • New Automation Layers
  • Ableton Link Start/Stop
  • MIDI Learn Recording
  • MIDI Drum Triggering
  • MIDI Only Tracks
  • Custom MIDI CC Outputs
  • MIDI Gate Length Automation
  • Under the Hood Performance Improvements
  • Workflow Enhancements
  • And more…

Other Key Features:

  • Download hundreds of free factory and user-created drum kits.
  • Export directly to an Ableton Live Set or perfect audio loops.
  • Deep integration with MIDI for controlling and being controlled by hardware gear.
  • Sync with Ableton Live and other apps using Ableton Link.

SPECIFICATIONS :

iOS 10+, Recommended for iPad 3 and newer, Languages : English

PATTERNS

  • Unique circular sequencer with independent settings for each loop in each pattern. Create poly-metric and poly-rhythmic beats like never before.
  • Variable loop lengths from 1 to 64 steps.
  • Step durations from a thirty-second note up to a whole note, with dotted notes and triplets along the way.
  • NEW : Next generation ratcheting with unique “ratchet decay” setting for creating textural rolls and fast subdivisions of the beat.
  • NEW : Quantized pattern launching. Launch a pattern on the next down beat, nearest 32nd note, 16 measures in the future or anywhere in between.
  • Get wild with loop modes : Forwards, Reverse, Urn (random without repeating), and two Pendulum modes.
  • Auto-Rotate feature spins the loop after each rotation to create evolving rhythms.
  • NEW : Change a loop’s starting point with the new loop rotate feature. Nudge loops slightly off the grid or rotate by subdivisions of a step.
  • NEW : Updated Divide mode allows you to explore exotic polyrhythms like 7 against 11, 35 against 36, or even 3 against 4. New in version 2 is the ability to change the measure length of divide mode.
  • NEW : Attach tempo changes to patterns to change up the pace. Slide gradually to the new tempo or jump immediately to it.
  • 64 bits of sample velocity sensitivity. (That’s a lot of sensitivity!)
  • Draw and erase tools.
  • Special “Pen Echo” mode for quick entry of repeating patterns.

AUDIO & ABLETON LIVE EXPORT

  • Easily export multitrack or stereo audio files from Patterning.
  • Export directly to an Ableton Live Set with individual tracks for audio and MIDI. Includes a free copy of Ableton Live Lite! Get the download link from the Export window.

DRUM KITS & SAMPLES

  • NEW : Dynamically swap drum kits, changing samples and settings when a Pattern changes.
  • NEW : Download 100s of free factory and user generated drum kits with Cloud Kits. New kits are being added all the time!
  • NEW : Organize samples into folders.
  • NEW : Create your own kits and export them to share with other Patterning users via Cloud Kits.
  • Easy import your own samples with Dropbox, Audioshare, Files, or iTunes File Sharing.

INSTRUMENTS

  • NEW : Randomization of instrument parameters.
  • NEW : Quantized Coarse Tuning for easy melodic compositions. Works with randomization for randomly generated melodies.
  • Sample start and end times.
  • Sample gain.
  • Attack, hold, decay envelope for shaping the amplitude of your sounds.
  • Coarse and fine tuning.
  • 2 choke groups.
  • Multimode filter with variable resonance and cutoff frequency.
  • Delay and reverb sends.
  • Panning
  • Mute / Solo
  • Track Volume
  • Amazing visualizer!

AUTOMATION

  • Automation layers for animating track parameters : coarse and fine tuning, effects sends, panning, filter frequency and resonance, probability, and envelope settings.
  • NEW : Automate Parameter Randomization Amount.
  • NEW : Ratchet Count and Ratchet Decay automation.
  • NEW : Automate MIDI CCs & MIDI Gate Length.
  • NEW : Automation Record toggles on when recording is enabled.
  • NEW : Record automation using MIDI controllers.

NEW : RECORDING & MIDI INPUT

  • NEW : Record Pads allow you for recording patterns.
  • NEW : Overdub while recording to add parts one at a time.
  • NEW : Assign a MIDI controller to pads to play Patterning with using an external controller or to record.
  • NEW : Metronome
  • NEW : Quickly clear patterns or loops.
  • Use MIDI Learn to control Patterning with external MIDI devices. Customizable MIDI mapping to parameter ranges.

SONG MODE

  • Fill the timeline with patterns to create songs.
  • Seamlessly toggle timeline on and off during playback.
  • Loop mode for endless pattern sequences.
  • Double tap to jump to a block in the timeline.
  • Time signature and snap settings for maximum flexibility.
  • Multiple selection in timeline for quick duplication and editing.

FX

  • Digital Delay with feedback filter.
  • Tempo sync & free delay time modes.
  • 3 band EQ.
  • Unique distortion unit.
  • Reverb.

MIDI

  • Instrument MIDI settings allows maximum flexibility for ports, channels, and pitch.
  • Coarse Tune > MIDI Note automation for melodic MIDI sequencing.
  • Fine Tune > Pitch Bend automation for automating MIDI pitch bend.
  • NEW : Create MIDI CC automation lanes.
  • NEW : MIDI Note Length automation. Lengths longer than 100% are tied to successive notes to make longer MIDI notes.
  • Rock solid MIDI clock sync receive and send.
  • NEW : Audio/MIDI/Both setting to configure instrument output.
  • NEW : MIDI Settings are now accessible on the main PATTERN screen.
  • Import MIDI settings for quick MIDI mapping templates.

INTER-APP AUDIO

  • Master or individual track outputs for processing in IAA host apps like AUM and Audiobus.
  • Inter-App Audio clock sync and transport via the main IAA port.

ABLETON LINK

  • Use Ableton Link to sync Patterning to other devices or apps wirelessly. It’s like magic!
  • NEW : Link Start/Stop Support
  • NEW : Link Quantum Setting for configuring start/stop timing.

Patterning is available for pre-order for $14.99 on the app store with an expected release date of 31 July.

The post Patterning 2 is coming, and it’s going to be awesome appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme