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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Culture


Клуб: the St Petersburg rail factory that became a visionary nightclub

Delivered... Brooke McCord | Scene | Wed 19 Sep 2018 3:24 pm

Set in an industrial area far outside the city – and with industrial tracks to match - the nightclub Клуб is putting community before music to create a truly beloved space

Ask Sasha Tsereteli, founder of St Petersburg’s DIY nightclub Клуб, what the most important aspect of his club is and you might be surprised. Despite great success serving nights that span a melange of techno, acid, noise and industrial, he says that community comes first and music second. “It’s always been about getting people together, and seeing what happens,” he explains. “There are enough music clubs in the world so we never really positioned ourselves as one – I think that’s one of our best accomplishments. Although you can only afford to say that when your music programme is impeccable.”

Renowned as the duo who first brought international acts to St Petersburg, Sasha Tsereteli and his partner Julia Si had been running parties for a decade before co-founding Клуб (meaning “klub”) in November 2017. Housed within brutalist infrastructure – a former national railway factory – Клуб is not the kind of club you stumble upon by chance. Much like Berlin’s Berghain, it’s set far from civilisation, in an industrial area just outside the city. “Nobody comes here by accident,” says Tsereteli. “It’s nearly impossible, so we never know how many people will attend an event.”

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Inside Melbourne rave history – including cyberspace, Julian Assange

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 18 Sep 2018 9:27 pm

Okay, fine, Detroit, Berlin. But don’t forget Melbourne raves: home of the Melbourne shuffle, Internet-loving cyberdelica, and apparently, Julian Assange raving hard back in the 90s.

In these dark days of social media, maybe it’s worth revisiting why the Internet held promise for rave culture, for partying that had some wider awareness. That’s particularly apt in 2018 the Internet has proven a way of binding together scenes in techno and experimental electronic music and even encouraging activism.

Writer Simon Leo Brown of Australia’s ABC sends us this piece he’s just finished, revisiting that early culture. It’s likely to arouse some nostalgia I suspect in our Australian readers, and intrigue for the rest of the world:

Julian Assange was involved in Melbourne’s rave scene in the 1990s, Techno Shuffle book reveals [ABC News]

Remarkably, promoters offered up the novelty of Internet at raves, and even had text-based chat terminals. (Hmm, actually, IRC on some vintage terminals might be cool all over again. In New York we used to have a club called Remote Lounge next to CBGB’s that did this with closed circuit video cameras – but only locally.)

The Internet ethos was part of the ethos and aesthetic of the Melbourne 90s scene, says Paul Fleckney, author of Techno Shuffle: Rave Culture and the Melbourne Underground. And he points to the term “cyberdelic” – part cyberspace, part psychedelic:

“That was something that I think was very exciting, and so the internet just added another dimension to this kind of sensory overload that you already got at a rave.

“You’ve got lights, you’ve got sound, you’ve video visuals and then now we’ve got this global interface with the world.”

Perhaps now as we face the tensions of an over-connected world is an even better time to process this psychedelic quality of connected-ness. In any event, for an emblem of that tension, for the rave’s freedom and the power of the Internet and its dark side, we have … Julian Assange on the dancefloor. Assange evidently went by the alias “Prof” in the Melbourne scene, as a regular of Dream nightclub in Carlton, which Assange himself wired up for the net. We don’t have video of that, but at least we do get some footage of Julian dancing in Iceland:

I, uh, don’t know how I feel if there’s footage of me somewhere, but there you go. I’m not interesting or important. Please don’t look it up. 😉

There’s plenty more to explore for us non-Australians about what Melbourne did. Check out Simon’s story and interview with Fleckney about the book – the plot is familiar, including the shift from an open, no bouncer safe space for the marginalized to the velvet-rope scene later, to the dark side of drug use and mental health.

There are also a couple of documentaries available online, including one from Thump on Melbourne’s early days:

And for anyone who wanted over an hour of feature-length documentary on the Melbourne shuffle, a fast-paced rave dance step, there’s this (the rest of us can watch and practice):

The post Inside Melbourne rave history – including cyberspace, Julian Assange appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

‘We did it!’ – behind the decks at Paul Oakenfold’s Stonehenge rave

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Mon 17 Sep 2018 5:15 pm

He’s played Everest and the Great Wall of China. So what happened when Oakenfold set out to become the first person ever to DJ at Stonehenge? Our writer grabs his glow stick and heads for the A303

A Holiday Inn by the A303 is not really the kind of place you would expect to meet Paul Oakenfold. He is, after all, the person who almost singlehandedly invented the latter-day notion of the superstar DJ, and whose 30-year career has warranted not only a mention in the Guinness Book of Records (as “the world’s most successful DJ”) but also a a graphic novel. “This book,” reads the blurb, “charts the windy road taken to fame, fortune and musical nirvana.”

Yet here he is, in a business park just off the windy road taken to Basingstoke, dressed in tracksuit bottoms and exuding a surprising degree of nervousness about his next gig. Later today, he will become the first-ever DJ to play at Stonehenge, as the advance publicity has it. In fact, he almost certainly isn’t – someone must have played records between performances by Hawkwind and Gong at the infamous Stonehenge free festivals in the 1970s and 80s. But, technically, those events took place in fields adjacent to the stones, while Oakenfold is doing his stuff right in front of them.

I’ve been in Ibiza practising, timing music to sunsets. How do I build up into it? How can I touch you emotionally?

The event must look simultaneously spectacular and baffling

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The month’s best mixes: Discwoman, Gian Manik, LSDXOXO and more

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Wed 12 Sep 2018 9:00 am

The best DJ mixes and radio shows this month feature everything from exhilarating hardstyle to a cappella Farsi – plus a bit of My Humps by the Black Eyed Peas

August’s assortment of the world’s best mixes features musicians delivering distinctly erotic sets in summer heat, while folk-club hybrids, minimal polyrhythms and breathtaking hardstyle are also present.

Related: The month's best mixes: Gigsta, Susumu Yokota and 25 years of Dutch dynamo Clone

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Yves Tumor: Safe in the Hands of Love review – thrilling plunderphonics

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Fri 7 Sep 2018 7:00 am

(Warp)

As this year’s Reading & Leeds lineup showed, kids have extremely catholic tastes as a result of growing up with the radical accessibility of streaming, but musicians themselves still usually cleave to one or two aesthetics. Yves Tumor, though, is thrillingly untethered to style, and as such is a bard for our cultural moment.

Having previously released drifting ambient, clattering experimental trap, lo-fi vintage boogie and more, the secretive Tennessee expat continues to swerve from one mood to the next. Honesty is a driving analogue techno number in the vein of Hieroglyphic Being: arid, punchy 808 claps drive a bleating vocal line from a heartbroken Tumor. Then he handbrake-turns into the superb Noid, a piece of Avalanches-style breakbeat pop that perkily addresses police brutality. Then he reverses back into more lovelorn sadness on Licking an Orchid, this time to a trip-hop shuffle.

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Tracey Thorn, Nadine Shah and Peggy Gou top Aim independent music awards

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Tue 4 Sep 2018 10:00 pm

The awards for the best in British independent music acknowledged a wide-ranging series of names, from Goldie to Idles and Sophie

Tracey Thorn has been awarded the most prestigious prize at the Aim independent music awards, which recognise the best in British music from outside the major label system.

Thorn was presented with the outstanding contribution to music prize, for a career that has featured major chart hits with duo Everything But the Girl, as well as solo work including this year’s album Record. Another award for an entire career’s work, the Pioneer award, was presented to drum’n’bass star Goldie.

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50 great tracks for September from BTS, Marie Davidson, Boygenius and more

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Mon 3 Sep 2018 10:00 am

From Empress Of’s modern classic to the magnificent angst of Boygenius, here are 50 new tracks you shouldn’t miss – read about our 10 favourites below, and subscribe to the playlists

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Wysing Polyphonic review – explosions in the sonic inventing shed

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Sun 2 Sep 2018 12:50 pm

Wysing Arts Centre, Cambridgeshire
Moor Mother and Paul Purgas curate an inspirational gathering where electronic artists, dancers and poets freely test the boundaries of expression

‘Noises of spoons!” I’m in an octagonal wooden structure that’s half Grand Designs man-shed, half denouement to a slasher movie, in a field in the Cambridgeshire countryside. Elaine Mitchener is kicking things off at Wysing Polyphonic, delivering scat poetry that’s as light, intricate and unmappable as rain falling on a roof. Alongside her is Neil Charles, tapping his double bass’s body like a faith healer, a tambourine tucked in its neck. Mitchener’s spoon mantra dissolves into stutters. She clicks shells and stones in her hands, as the bass fumbles and shuffles – the pair are trying to put something or other back in one piece.

This is one of the most valuable music festivals in the country – one that refuses, inspirationally, to put anything neatly together. Curated this year by avant-gardists Camae Ayewa (AKA Moor Mother) and Paul Purgas, it’s a loose study of corporeality and groove.

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Tunng: Songs You Make at Night review – a welcome return

Delivered... Neil Spencer | Scene | Sun 2 Sep 2018 8:00 am

(Full Time Hobby)

Sam Genders and Mike Lindsay became the founding fathers of “folktronica” in the 00s with a slew of innovative albums with Tunng. The pair have travelled separate paths over the past decade: Genders forming the band Diagrams, Lindsay moving to Reykjavik, then on to this year’s collaboration with singer Laura Marling as Lump. Here, they reconvene Tunng’s original line-up for an album that builds seamlessly on its predecessors’ strengths; dreamy moods, pastoral landscapes undercut with dark currents, and conjurations of acoustic and electronic instrumentation. It’s lighter on the sampled clicks, whirrs and speech of their early work, and heavier on the beats; Dark Heart has a Kraftwerk-like coda, and there are burbles of Fender Rhodes piano throughout.

The appeal, however, is much the same; Genders’s delicate falsetto (in the manner of Robert Wyatt) is full of lyrical surprises – “fragments of a better life” that rain from the sky, visions of “an army of abandoned souls” – and comes counterpointed by Becky Jacobs’s haunting vocals. The melodies are simple but lovely, often spelled out on tumbling acoustic guitar, as on Like Water, before being taken up by the group. It’s wonderful to have them back.

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The Man from Mo’Wax review – from superstar DJ to rock bore

Delivered... Cath Clarke | Scene | Thu 30 Aug 2018 3:00 pm

This hit-and-miss documentary charting the life and career of James Lavelle feels too much like a promo

The rise and fall of James Lavelle, the record label founder and DJ, is the subject of this celebratory music documentary by Matthew Jones. In the 1990s, Lavelle was music’s Damien Hirst – a cocky upstart with a genius for A&R matched only by a gift for self-promotion. At 18, he opened the hip label Mo’Wax and helped to popularise trip-hop (though signing Tricky and Portishead evaded him). Everything he touched turned to gold, until it didn’t.

Ego, money, drugs: Lavelle’s story has the makings of an entertaining account of the music business. But this film feels too much like a promo for a comeback attempt. Its greatest strength is archive from the personal collections of Lavelle and Josh Davis, AKA DJ Shadow, whose groundbreaking sample album Endtroducing marked Mo’Wax’s high point. The clubbing footage brings back a chemical rush of the 90s London dance scene.

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The Man from Mo’Wax review – from superstar DJ to rock bore

Delivered... Cath Clarke | Scene | Thu 30 Aug 2018 3:00 pm

This hit-and-miss documentary charting the life and career of James Lavelle feels too much like a promo

The rise and fall of James Lavelle, the record label founder and DJ, is the subject of this celebratory music documentary by Matthew Jones. In the 1990s, Lavelle was music’s Damien Hirst – a cocky upstart with a genius for A&R matched only by a gift for self-promotion. At 18, he opened the hip label Mo’Wax and helped to popularise trip-hop (though signing Tricky and Portishead evaded him). Everything he touched turned to gold, until it didn’t.

Ego, money, drugs: Lavelle’s story has the makings of an entertaining account of the music business. But this film feels too much like a promo for a comeback attempt. Its greatest strength is archive from the personal collections of Lavelle and Josh Davis, AKA DJ Shadow, whose groundbreaking sample album Endtroducing marked Mo’Wax’s high point. The clubbing footage brings back a chemical rush of the 90s London dance scene.

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Bland on Blonde: why the old rock music canon is finished

Delivered... Michael Hann | Scene | Wed 29 Aug 2018 11:35 am

The 1970s brought about the idea that rock was important – and needed a canon of greatest albums to match. But in a digital age, is definitive musical excellence a ridiculous notion?

Rock’s flight into seriousness in the 1970s had many ill effects. There was prog rock, jamming, not releasing singles – and the idea that the couple of decades since Elvis had produced enough music of sufficient worth to produce a canon. In 1974, like a university English department sending out a reading list to undergraduates, NME polled its writers and published its list of the top 100 albums of all time. The Beatles’ Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was No 1, Bob Dylan’s Blonde on Blonde was No 2, the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds was No 3 – you could imagine just such a top three being published today.

A few period pieces aside – it’s a long time since Spirit, Frank Zappa, Johnny Winter, Joe Cocker or Country Joe and the Fish featured in a generalist greatest albums list – it set a template for the pop canon that has remained largely untouched for more than 40 years, by adhering to certain rules.

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Creamfields review – inhibitions shed for sensory EDM overload

Delivered... Daniel Dylan Wray | Scene | Mon 27 Aug 2018 4:30 pm

Daresbury, Cheshire
With Eric Prydz, the Chainsmokers and Annie Mac providing beats from breakfast to bedtime, hedonistic energy was needed for the 20th anniversary of the dance festival – and the audience delivered

Celebrating its 20th year, the festival run by the famed Liverpool club night returns to capture the breadth of commercial-leaning dance music, from 90s trance stars to modern EDM giants.

Ex-professional football player Hannah Wants delivers pumping house on a Friday afternoon, and by the time of Green Velvet’s house and techno-stuffed set, the whole festival is bouncing harder than most manage at 4am. There’s no gradual build up to ease you in, just an on switch and an off switch; beats from breakfast until bedtime. This all-or-nothing approach seems to shed inhibitions, and creates a fiery feeling of hedonism from the audience who throw themselves into the party with infectious aplomb.

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John Grant: ‘I’m sensitive. I spent a lot of time trying to destroy that’

Delivered... Dave Simpson | Scene | Mon 27 Aug 2018 1:00 pm

The rollercoaster-loving, Chris-Morris-worshipping songwriter is back with more mordantly funny and exquisitely painful songs about nationalism, Chelsea Manning and love

John Grant was born in 1968 in Michigan and raised in Colorado, in a Methodist household that disapproved of his homosexuality. His mother, who died of lung cancer in 1995, called him a “disappointment”. He was a drug addict, the frontman of the Czars and a waiter before releasing three acclaimed solo albums of heartfelt melancholy and exquisitely raw lyrics that resulted in a Brit award nomination in 2014 for best international male solo artist. He says his new album, Love Is Magic, is “more of an amalgamation of who I am” and captures “the absurdity and beauty of life”.

On Love Is Magic, you collaborate with the electronic artist Benge [Ben Edwards, who plays in Wrangler with the former Cabaret Voltaire man Stephen Mallinder]. How did that come about?
I had an amazing time doing the Creep Show album with them last year and we clicked. I felt he could help me realise my vision. When Wrangler opened for me at the Royal Albert Hall, I went on stage to remind everybody that they were seeing British royalty. I wasn’t talking about myself!

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Felicita: the producer confronting Polish identity through pop

Delivered... Steph Kretowicz | Scene | Thu 23 Aug 2018 7:00 am

As a child, felicita was embarrassed by the ‘uncool’ world of Polish folk dance – but blended with his experimental pop, it became a way to explore Anglo-Polish frictions

“This whole thing is not about reviving folk cuture,” says felicita in reference to the impulse behind his debut album, Hej!, a surreal opus combining garish and fractured pieces of pop with a newfound appreciation for Slavic dance. “It’s about finding ways to make new ideas. At times I was imagining: if there was a Pixar about medieval Poland, what would the soundtrack sound like?”

The London-based producer is speaking through video chat from under the stairs of a studio, his mop of black hair parted in the centre, sitting slightly hunched as he talks to his phone screen while trying to catch the wifi. He’s a petite person with a formidable portfolio of music for millennials, a hyper-cute hardcore style that surfaced in a debut EP called (>’.’)># in 2013. That was followed by Frenemies in 2014, and A New Family, dropped via London’s PC Music, two years later. Hej! came out on the same label this month, but is a wildly different proposition.

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