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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » dance-music


Techno lovers, don’t miss James Ruskin’s new EP and updated Blueprint catalog

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 19 Jul 2019 3:17 pm

It’s the Detroit-Croydon connection. But for innovative electronic dance sounds, you really don’t want to miss James Ruskin – either his new EP or the refreshed Bandcamp page for Blueprint Records.

First, out today, you get a new James Ruskin EP – and it’s brilliant, worth the five year wait from the last one. This time, we’ll get a second solo Ruskin by the fall, plus something new on 12″ from the always-excellent Truncate, all on Ruskin’s stalwart Blueprint Records (founded back in the storied 1990s with (Richard) Poison.

I mean, blah blah, techno is dead, nothing new is happening, I can’t hear you over this track, just for example –

Yes, techno is perhaps overly driven by influencers and Instagram accounts, except I can’t really think of anything intelligent to say other than “go hear it.” Maybe I should work out my wardrobe and just tell you that from Instagram and adapt to the times.

You can have it today on vinyl – still in stock at Decks for a slim 9 bucks:

https://www.decks.de/track/james_ruskin-reality_broadcast_off/cf2-g0

But don’t stop there, as it appears the full Blueprint Bandcamp page has gotten a refresh, chock full of re-released back catalog. Also this week is this lovely collab with Mark Broom:

And then Blueprint just goes on and on from there, from Samuel Kerridge and Surgeon, whose St. Petersburg sets last weekend are part of the reason CDM news has been a bit slow on the road this week, to Lakker and O/V/R. Have at it then. It’s summer (for one hemisphere), and music is still endless joy (for everyone, I hope).

https://blueprintrecords.bandcamp.com/

James Ruskin will release his first solo EP in five years later this month.

Reality Broadcast Off, the influential UK techno artist’s first solo EP since 2014’s Nan Nife, has three tracks that find Ruskin in the sort of deep techno mode of Ostgut Ton peers like Marcel Dettmann, who played “Disaffection” on a recent mix for BBC Radio 1. The EP will come out on Ruskin’s long-running label, Blueprint Records, on July 19th.

Blueprint also has two more releases in the works. A second solo Ruskin EP is scheduled for this autumn, followed by a new Truncate 12-inch. More details will follow soon.

The post Techno lovers, don’t miss James Ruskin’s new EP and updated Blueprint catalog appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The month’s best mixes: infectious singeli and full-throttle floorfillers

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Wed 3 Jul 2019 12:34 pm

DJ Duke and MCZO take flight for 48 minutes of east African dance music, while Gabber Eleganza goes back to the early 90s

Related: The month's best mixes: steely funk, Lisbon tarraxo and hardcore psychedelia

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‘Michael Eavis didn’t know what dance music is’: a history of rave at Glastonbury

Delivered... Joe Muggs | Scene | Sat 29 Jun 2019 9:00 am

At some point in the late 80s – though no one remembers exactly when – Glastonbury festival became a nexus of the traveller, free party and acid-house scenes, and the festival was never the same again

Giant rubber duckies; tunnels of flowers; bassbins disguised with gingham tablecloths; sitting in upturned burning cars as entertainment. As if it weren’t enough of a struggle trying to get people to untangle their first Glastonbury raving memories from three decades ago, the things they do remember feel pretty hallucinatory on their own.

Nobody can be quite sure when raving first started in Glastonbury. Obviously all-night dancing predates acid house, but through the 80s that meant dub reggae: Youth of Killing Joke and the Orb remembers Saxon and Jah Shaka soundsystems as “the only music you could go dance to all night long that wasn’t acoustic around a bonfire”. The Mutoid Waste Company’s dystopian wreckage sculptures hosted pagan-industrial metal-banging dances throughout the night. Dance music as such wasn’t unknown, though. Mark Darby of Exeter’s Mighty Force collective says: “The first traveller soundsystem playing dance music I personally heard was Crazy Dave’s Record Bus – an old green coach with huge speakers – going through a disco phase, one afternoon at Stonehenge 83!”

Glastonbury is banning single use plastics. The world’s largest greenfield festival wants to avoid scenes of the area in front of its legendary stages being strewn with plastic after the shows have ended. In 2017, visitors to the festival got through 1.3m plastic bottles. 

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Hidden gems on the 2019 Glastonbury lineup

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 2:47 pm

Bewildered by the hundreds of acts at Glastonbury? The Guardian’s music editors pick the best names from lower down the bill

The must-see musical experience of the weekend is this brand-new stage from the Block9 crew, whose club spaces routinely provide the festival’s best after-hours moments. IICON will have artists playing from a giant sculpture of a head, and they’re a who’s who of cutting-edge electronics: galaxy-cartographer Larry Heard, dub geniuses Raime, thunderously angry poet Moor Mother, junglist poet Lee Gamble, South African pairing Okzharp and Manthe Ribane, and tons of forward-thinking techno: Bruce, Zenker Brothers, Karenn and more. Sleep all day, bring a carrier bag of falafels, and you could happily spend your entire weekend here.

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Euphoria here we come! Fatboy Slim on his ‘silent’ Ibiza film with Julien Temple

Delivered... Sam Wollaston | Scene | Tue 25 Jun 2019 12:53 pm

Norman Cook has spent three decades blowing the Ibiza party crowd away. The DJ reveals why he teamed up with the director to capture 2,000 years of the island’s wild, strange history

Superstar DJ Fatboy Slim was recently thinking about – and questioning – what it is he does. “I’m just a middle-aged man playing a lot of loud squelching noises to young people, waving his arms around in the air. What really is that?” he asked himself.

But then it does make them dance and smile, and he, Norman Cook, still enjoys doing it. “It’s not what I would have chosen to be doing at this age” – 55 – “but I’m loving it so much. It’s the best job in the world because I love music, and my love of music involves sharing it with people.”

Ibiza: The Silent Movie is out 5 July and screens at Glastonbury on 26 June.

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Philippe Zdar: a studio master who gave pop a peerless joie de vivre

Delivered... Laura Snapes | Scene | Thu 20 Jun 2019 2:00 pm

The French producer has died after a freak accident – but leaves a legacy as a bon viveur who sprinkled everyone from Phoenix to Kanye West with his magic

Philippe Zdar knew about the beauty of chance moments. On his first day as a tea boy at Studio Marcadet on the outskirts of Paris in the late 1980s, he earned respect when it turned out that, improbably, he was the only person present who knew how to roll a spliff. On his third day, Jane Birkin came to record, before a performance that night. She was suffering from chronic back pain and required a cortisone shot that nobody knew how to administer. The show would be cancelled if she didn’t get it. Zdar, fresh from his national service stint as an army nurse, volunteered to inject her. You can picture the scene: French music veterans holding their breath as a young scrapper performs DIY medicine on a national icon. It worked: the show went on, and studio owner Dominique Blanc-Francard hired the young Zdar.

After providing nascent productions for French rapper MC Solaar alongside Hubert Blanc-Francard (AKA Boom Bass), Zdar had a revelation on a dancefloor: in December 1992, he took ecstasy at a rave and realised he had to pursue his love of Detroit techno and Chicago house. He was encouraged by an offer from James Lavelle of Mo’ Wax to release his and Blanc-Francard’s Solaar productions as instrumental tracks. In 1994, the pair released two influential EPs of house, techno, hip-hop and breakbeat as La Funk Mob, before forming Cassius. Zdar also formed Motorbass with Étienne de Crécy, and helped define the sample-heavy, filtered take on house that would become known as French touch. But he turned down label deals, and remained sceptical of the scene and the speed with which this new sound coalesced into cliche.

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Mike Dunn: the funky freak still uniting rap and house

Delivered... Lauren Martin | Scene | Tue 18 Jun 2019 2:00 pm

A thwarted deal with P Diddy left the Chicago house star ‘in a real dismal place’. But by reconnecting with the propulsive hip-house genre that he pioneered, he’s bounced back brighter

‘Well all right, you squares …” So begins Mike Dunn’s 1995 house classic God Made Me Phunky, as if he’s settling into an acid-tongued children’s story. The track becomes a rambling tale of how God takes him “on that spaceship up to, y’know, the funkiness”; his voice, full of sensual braggadocio, booms out over the beat, where raw drums crash underneath a looping piano hook. It’s one of the hip–house genre’s finest moments, a blend of dance and rap music that Dunn pioneered and is still pushing forward.

He’s just released his 2017 album, My House from All Angles, digitally for the first time, 29 years after his 1990 debut Free Your Mind. The ups and downs in the intervening years are a key part of house history.

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Sounds like summer: the ten best niche music festivals

Delivered... Kate Hutchinson, Ammar Kalia, Tara Joshi, Jude Rogers | Scene | Sat 15 Jun 2019 3:00 pm

Festival Fomo? Fear not. The big ones are sold out, but here’s our pick of the smaller gatherings that still have tickets

Eridge Park, Kent, 21-23 June

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Hot Chip: ‘Escapism is the opposite of what we should be doing’

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sun 9 Jun 2019 10:00 am

On the eve of their seventh album, the best British pop act of their generation talk about two decades of music-making

A quiet Friday afternoon by London’s Regent’s Canal. Two dads who have known each other since they were 11 – they’re now 39 – are having lunch without the kids. One is a smiling, broad-shouldered bear in a pink T-shirt. The other is smaller and bespectacled, hiding under a baseball cap. They look slightly hipsterish, but blend into the background seamlessly. A huge yellow bag and rucksack under the table contain their rather different outfits for later that day.

Five hours later, Alexis Taylor is in front of thousands at the All Points East festival in Victoria Park, Hackney, his cap removed to reveal rainbow-coloured hair, a DayGlo lifejacket with holes around the nipples swaddling his body. Joe Goddard, meanwhile, is rocking back and forth behind a bank of synthesisers, wearing a colourful jacket with a pattern by artist Jeremy Deller (also unfolded from the dad bags). Joining them are the rest of their crazily dressed band: guitarist Al Doyle in a linen tunic and trousers like a latterday apostle, brightly clothed multi-instrumentalist Owen Clarke, and synthesiser player Felix Martin smiling under his mop of madcap curls. Rob Smoughton (bass, congas, silvery beard, straw boater) and Leo Taylor (drums, lime-green top with pagan symbols) complete the live line-up.

I wrote the songs for people to bathe in, or be lost in in an active way

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Natalie Portman criticises ‘creepy’ Moby over ‘disturbing’ account of friendship

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Wed 22 May 2019 10:16 am

Musician says in memoir the pair dated, but Portman disputes account, saying ‘my recollection is a much older man being creepy with me’

Natalie Portman has criticised Moby for a “very disturbing” account of their friendship in his new memoir Then It Fell Apart.

In the book, the musician, now 53, claims the pair dated when he was 33 and Portman was 20, after she met him backstage in Austin, Texas. He recounts going to parties in New York with her, and to see her at Harvard University, “kissing under the centuries-old oak trees. At midnight she brought me to her dorm room and we lay down next to each other on her small bed. After she fell asleep I carefully extracted myself from her arms and took a taxi back to my hotel.” He says that he then struggled with anxiety about their relationship: “It wanted one thing: for me to be alone … nothing triggered my panic attacks more than getting close to a woman I cared about.” Later, he writes: “For a few weeks I had tried to be Natalie’s boyfriend, but it hadn’t worked out,” writing that she called to tell him she had met someone else.

Related: Then It Fell Apart by Moby review – sex, drugs and self-loathing

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The month’s best mixes: steely funk, Lisbon tarraxo and hardcore psychedelia

Delivered... Lauren Martin | Scene | Tue 21 May 2019 1:00 pm

Our May selection features Job Sifre’s bitter electro, TSVI’s polyrhythms, and a trip down memory lane with Tama Sumo

Related: 'We're not beard-strokers!' Wigflex, Nottingham's 'rudeboy techno' night

Related: The month's best mixes: dancefloor stormers and experimental sidewinders

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Beats, rhymes and strife: how ravers raised the roof on mass protest

Delivered... Libby Brooks | Scene | Fri 17 May 2019 12:55 pm

A new film about Glasgow’s thumping 90s clubland traces a lineage of grassroots radicalism still thriving today

Beats is a gem of a film that has drawn attention not just for its exuberant depiction of early 1990s rave culture but the deeper questions it raises, 25 years on, about the legislation that criminalised the free party movement – and about how the UK pivoted from Reclaim the Streets, via Cool Britannia, to Brexit Britain.

Set in the summer of 1994, as the Criminal Justice Bill threatened to outlaw musical gatherings around “sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats”, the film charts the friendship – by turns madcap and tender – between teenagers Johnno and Spanner as they struggle to escape the restrictions of family and class on their West Lothian housing estate. With the help of a sisterly gang of older girls, the boys bounce into their local rave scene and soak up the ethic that “the only good system is a sound system, and if I can’t dance then it’s not my revolution”.

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‘We’re not beard-strokers!’ Wigflex, Nottingham’s ‘rudeboy techno’ night

Delivered... Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 3:47 pm

With its hotchpotch of electro, breakbeat and garage, Wigflex has become a beacon in Nottingham where ‘there’s not loads of things to do, so people come and forget their troubles’

When soulful singer-songwriter Yazmin Lacey first met Lukas Cole, AKA Lukas Wigflex, she told him his party didn’t sound appealing. “He’s like, ‘Yeah come down!’ And I told him I wasn’t really into that kind of music,” she says. “There’s not a lot of people I know running nights that would stand there at a house party and take that on the chin.”

Accepting a free ticket anyway, Lacey put her theory to the test, and lost. Still not always sold on techno, she’s now a Wigflex regular, lured on to the dancefloor by the open attitude and lack of black-clad affectation Nottingham’s most respected nocturnal session is known for.

Related: 10 of the best city music festivals in the UK for 2019

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‘We’re not beard-strokers!’ Wigflex, Nottingham’s ‘rudeboy techno’ night

Delivered... Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 3:47 pm

With its hotchpotch of electro, breakbeat and garage, Wigflex has become a beacon in Nottingham where ‘there’s not loads of things to do, so people come and forget their troubles’

When soulful singer-songwriter Yazmin Lacey first met Lukas Cole, AKA Lukas Wigflex, she told him his party didn’t sound appealing. “He’s like, ‘Yeah come down!’ And I told him I wasn’t really into that kind of music,” she says. “There’s not a lot of people I know running nights that would stand there at a house party and take that on the chin.”

Accepting a free ticket anyway, Lacey put her theory to the test, and lost. Still not always sold on techno, she’s now a Wigflex regular, lured on to the dancefloor by the open attitude and lack of black-clad affectation Nottingham’s most respected nocturnal session is known for.

Related: 10 of the best city music festivals in the UK for 2019

Continue reading...

Holly Herndon: Proto review – dizzying beauty and bracing beats

Delivered... Emily Mackay | Scene | Sun 12 May 2019 8:00 am
(4AD)

Related: Holly Herndon: the musician who birthed an AI baby

It’s credit to Holly Herndon’s skill as a musical guide that her third album, though up to its elbows in complex ideas, feels so invigorating. Her boldest attempt yet to reconfigure modern dilemmas musical, technological and philosophical, it looks back, finding inspiration in the church choirs of her youth, and leaps forward, with a self-designed “AI baby” called Spawn – no android overlord, but just another member of her ensemble.

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