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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » dance-music


The KLF reissue music for first time since 1992

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 4:12 pm

Singles compilation Solid State Logik 1 appears on streaming services and YouTube years after being deleted, with further reissues anticipated soon

Rave-pop iconoclasts the KLF have released their greatest hits on to streaming services and YouTube for the first time, and have hinted at further music to follow later this year.

An eight-track collection entitled Solid State Logik 1 has been released today, including 1988 No 1 novelty single Doctorin’ the Tardis, 1991 UK No 1 dance anthem 3am Eternal, and the Top 5 hits Last Train to Trancentral and America: What Time is Love? also released that year.

Related: Return of the KLF: ‘They were agents of chaos. Now the world they anticipated is here’

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For Those I Love: Ireland’s potent new poet of grief

Delivered... Aniefiok Ekpoudom | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 7:00 am

Recalling the delivery of the Streets and the music of James Blake, David Balfe’s project is a cathartic document in the wake his best friend’s death

When the Irish recession of 2008 shattered the country’s economy, communities from Dublin’s inner city neighbourhoods of Coolock and Donaghmede were struck hard. The frank lyrics of David Balfe, under the pseudonym For Those I Love, illuminate a generation who emerged from the wreckage.

“I’ve been with people whose families had lost their livelihoods because of the recession,” says the 29-year-old. “At that younger age you don’t have the vocabulary, but you see that displacement, and you think: ‘Why are we suffering? Why has this happened to us?’”

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For Those I Love: Ireland’s potent new poet of grief

Delivered... Aniefiok Ekpoudom | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 7:00 am

Recalling the delivery of the Streets and the music of James Blake, David Balfe’s project is a cathartic document in the wake his best friend’s death

When the Irish recession of 2008 shattered the country’s economy, communities from Dublin’s inner city neighbourhoods of Coolock and Donaghmede were struck hard. The frank lyrics of David Balfe, under the pseudonym For Those I Love, illuminate a generation who emerged from the wreckage.

“I’ve been with people whose families had lost their livelihoods because of the recession,” says the 29-year-old. “At that younger age you don’t have the vocabulary, but you see that displacement, and you think: ‘Why are we suffering? Why has this happened to us?’”

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Irish drill, jazz violin and supermarket musicals: 30 new artists for 2021

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 7:00 am

From the ferocious hardcore punk of Nicolas Cage Fighter to the ultra-meditative ambient of KMRU, discover new music from right across the pop spectrum

Which new artists are you excited for in 2021? Leave your recommendations in the comments below.

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Irish drill, jazz violin and supermarket musicals: 30 new artists for 2021

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 7:00 am

From the ferocious hardcore punk of Nicolas Cage Fighter to the ultra-meditative ambient of KMRU, discover new music from right across the pop spectrum

Which new artists are you excited for in 2021? Leave your recommendations in the comments below.

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Musician, heal thyself: how ambient music brought solace in 2020

Delivered... Kate Hutchinson | Scene | Tue 29 Dec 2020 3:00 pm

With no clubs or gigs to go to and pandemic anxiety to quell, ambient music chimed more strongly in a year when artists reconsidered their sense of purpose

“A balm to your soul” – so went the Observer review of Julianna Barwick’s album this July, which was inspired by the musician’s move from New York City to the wellbeing mecca of Los Angeles. Her one-woman choir of celestial vocals is as calming as the bit at the end of a yoga class where you get to shut your eyes and lie under a blanket, and the album, along with its title Healing Is a Miracle, had extra resonance in 2020. Music is so often a communal experience, but with those possibilities snatched away this year, many of us have looked to sounds like this to soothe us where human connection couldn’t. Another reviewer agreed, writing that Barwick’s new music was “a salve for the collective wound”.

Barwick wasn’t the only one. Earlier this year, I interviewed a collection of musicians, including the pop performer Robyn, about the music of Beverly Glenn-Copeland, a cult Canadian musician whose spirited, otherworldly incantations are only just reaching new audiences, decades after they were first released. A retrospective of Glenn-Copeland’s music, Transmissions, came out last month, and Robyn noted the particular reassuring quality of his songs, especially on his New Age lost treasure Keyboard Fantasies: “It’s the purpose of his music,” she had said. “We all need to release, feel and heal, and Glenn helps us to do that through his own experiences.”

Soundscapes spoke to the claustrophobia and drift of isolation … ethereal singing suggested possibility in some untethered parallel universe

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You can make your holidays completely techno with Techno Club

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Thu 24 Dec 2020 8:54 pm

One of the best adaptations to this year's adverse conditions - of course - came from the Detroit scene. Techno Club responds to everything wrong with streaming, and if you've got some days off and want to bring quality club music home, here's your shot.

The post You can make your holidays completely techno with Techno Club appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

‘It speaks to an ancient history’: why South Africa has the world’s most exciting dance music

Delivered... Marcus Barnes | Scene | Mon 21 Dec 2020 1:00 pm

Styles like afrohouse, gqom and amapiano are thriving – but with ‘half-baked white kids getting a lot more airplay’, South Africa’s inequalities still hold the dance scene back

Many people got their first taste of South African dance music this year via six Angolans dancing in their backyard, dinner plates in hand. Their viral video, with casual but masterful moves set to Jerusalema by South African producer Master KG, created a global dance craze; the track ended up all over Radio 1 this autumn and topped streaming charts across Europe.

Jerusalema is just one track amid what has now become arguably the most vibrant and innovative dance music culture on the planet. In South Africa, dance music is pop music, from townships like Soweto and KwaDabeka to cities like Durban and Cape Town. The country has 11 official languages, each with their own cultural practices, and even the national anthem of the so-called Rainbow Nation is comprised of the country’s five most commonly spoken: Xhosa, Zulu, Sesotho, Afrikaans and English. Out of this rich cultural heritage, and in a country that has long had distinct dance styles like jaiva, marabi, kwela and mbaqanga, has come wave after wave of astonishing work.

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Guardian albums and tracks of 2020: how our writers voted

Delivered... Guardian music | Scene | Fri 18 Dec 2020 7:00 am

We’ve announced our favourite releases of the year – now the Guardian’s music critics reveal their individual top picks of 2020

Here’s how our writers voted: favourite choice first.

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Andrew Weatherall remembered by David Holmes

Delivered... David Holmes | Scene | Sat 12 Dec 2020 3:30 pm

6 April 1963 – 17 February 2020

The composer pays tribute to a brilliant polymath with singular musical vision, who was also a warm and wise friend

I’ll start by saying that DJing, remixing and producing were just something that Andrew did. I always looked at him as a much bigger presence. Spending a day with Andrew with a spliff and a cup of tea was an educational experience. I used to leave those meetings with fire in my belly, raring to go. He couldn’t wait to tell you about the new record he had just heard, or the new film he had just watched, or the new book he had just read, because he wanted you to taste what he had just experienced. He wasn’t precious or pretentious. He wanted to share the love.

In 1990, I saw him play at a club in London. He was already this mythical, brilliant DJ. I remember getting up the courage to say: “Hi, my name’s David. I live in Belfast. Will you come and play at my club Sugar Sweet?” He said: “I’d absolutely love to come to Belfast. I’ve read so many books about it.” He arrived with his corkscrew curly hair, motorbike boots, leather trousers and Breton top. He looked amazing. Back then, a lot of DJs wouldn’t come to Belfast, and rightly so! I get it. But Andrew was fascinated by it. He liked to go to the weird, off-kilter, dangerous places. He loved outsiders.

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The 50 best albums of 2020: 50-31

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 2 Dec 2020 7:06 am

The sounds in our countdown turn to horny pop, neo-soul fantasy, a trap masterclass and some robotic dance moves

This list is drawn from votes by Guardian music critics – each critic votes for their top 20 albums, with points allocated for each placing, and those points tallied to create this order. Check in every weekday to see our next picks, and please share your own favourite albums of 2020 in the comments below.

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The 20 best songs of 2020

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Mon 30 Nov 2020 7:00 am

Our writers considered hundreds of contenders – and here are their picks of the year. Listen to all 390 tracks they voted for on our playlist

We kick off our end of 2020 music coverage with Guardian critics’ favourite songs, with our album of the year countdown starting tomorrow. As ever, each critic votes for top 20 songs and albums, with points allocated for each placing, and those points tallied to make these lists. There were 390 songs voted for in all – we’ve put (almost) all of them in a Spotify playlist. Please share your own favourite songs of the year in the comments below, and we’ll hopefully see you in a festival field in 2021 …

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The xx’s Romy: ‘I can now write about loving a woman and not feel afraid’

Delivered... Aimee Cliff | Scene | Fri 27 Nov 2020 7:00 am

Her forthcoming solo album is a love letter to formative years of queer clubbing and 00s Euro-dance, as the singer swaps black clothes and bleak moods for Technicolor euphoria

The problem with being an introvert writing dance music is that eventually you will have to dance in front of other people. “I’m definitely quite a shy dancer,” says Romy Madley Croft over a video call from the home she shares with her girlfriend, the photographer Vic Lentaigne, in north London. In lockdown, with no prospect of live shows, this wasn’t a problem, but now she’s starting to nervously ponder how she will perform her upbeat, house-indebted new music. “It’s taken a long time to get to the place where I really enjoy being on stage.”

Fifteen years, in fact. The familiar image of Madley Croft is as bassist and singer with the xx, the band she formed with London schoolfriends in 2005: dressed in black, shielded by her guitar, expression ranging between pensive and troubled. Even performing a sparkling dance track on stage, such as Loud Places by her fellow wallflower and bandmate Jamie xx (“I go to loud places to find someone to be quiet with,” she sings on the chorus), she stayed largely rooted to the spot. Yet on the cover of her debut solo single, Lifetime, in an acid-hued image captured – like the ones accompanying this article – by Lentaigne, she is caught in motion, arms raised high, hair swooshed.

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‘I’m an alchemist’: Nova, the unknown MC with the Scottish album of the year

Delivered... Katie Hawthorne | Scene | Mon 2 Nov 2020 1:44 pm

With an English accent in a scene dominated by white men, the 24-year-old rapper felt like an outcast at first – but a £20,000 award win is set to supercharge her career

At £20,000, the Scottish Album of the Year (SAY) award is one of the most lucrative in the UK. But for this year’s winner Shaheeda Sinckler – AKA Nova – it’s about more than money: the prize is a vindication of her total self-sufficiency.

The rapper is virtually unknown – she had only around 300 monthly listeners on Spotify prior to her win – but her coolly confident, lyrically deft debut album Re-Up is a deserving winner, spanning grime, trap, Afrobeats, dubstep and frosty electronica in collaboration with some of Scotland’s fastest-rising producers. It beat far more prominent nominees, including Lewis Capaldi and Anna Meredith, by capturing the spirit of the nation’s underground nightlife, but most importantly it cements Sinckler’s own identity as an artist.

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Shut Up and Dance: the Hackney rap duo who raved against racism

Delivered... Michael Lawson | Scene | Wed 28 Oct 2020 9:26 am

By accelerating hip-hop breakbeats, and pouring the pain of bigotry and authoritarian rule into music, Carl ‘Smiley’ Hyman and Philip ‘PJ’ Johnson blazed a trail that led to rave and jungle

In British dance music history, the likes of Shoom, Spectrum and the Haçienda are often held up as the defining clubs from the scene’s formative years in the late 1980s. But for Carl “Smiley” Hyman and Philip “PJ” Johnson, better known as pioneering duo Shut Up and Dance, the aforementioned clubs paled in comparison to Dungeons on Lea Bridge Road in east London.

“You’re never gonna find a spot like that again,” PJ insists. “There were all these tunnels, each with their own sound system, all linked together like some sewage system. By the end of the night there’d be sweat dripping from the ceiling.”

Related: Sign up for the Sleeve Notes email: music news, bold reviews and unexpected extras

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