Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » dance-music


Shanti Celeste: Tangerine review – club music with subtlety and depth

Delivered... Aimee Cliff | Scene | Fri 15 Nov 2019 11:00 am

(Peach Discs)
The Bristolian DJ and producer’s nuanced debut is an enveloping listen, folding softer textures into its 2am beats

The transition from DJ to album artist is a tricky one. While one art is about reading the room, the other is a more isolated and intimate experience. For Bristolian Shanti Celeste, on her debut full-length Tangerine, it’s an opportunity to show subtlety and depths that she doesn’t often have space to explore on the dancefloor.

Continue reading...

No fighting or ego biting! Homoelectric, Manchester’s queer clubbing utopia

Delivered... Gabriel Szatan | Scene | Thu 14 Nov 2019 11:19 am

Founded in 1997, Homoelectric railed against the tacky scene in Manchester’s Gay Village with acid, techno and Italo disco. It has now scaled up to a 10,000-person festival, complete with unicorn drag queens

‘For homos, heteros, lesbos and don’t knows.” Since 1997, these words have guided Manchester’s Homoelectric. Started as a retort to the entrenched etiquette and increasingly tacky music of the bars clustered around Canal Street in the city’s Gay Village, Homoelectric grew to become one of the UK’s best-loved institutions. Prioritising a musical policy of house, techno, space disco, Italo, acid and outsider pop that was uncommonly eclectic for the time, it has survived waves of changes to Manchester’s physical landscape, as well as shifts in the wider social ones. Upscaling an independent and nomadic gay night to a 10,000-capacity festival, though? A high-stakes manoeuvre.

It had been in Homoelectric co-founder Luke Unabomber’s mind for years, but repeated attempts to establish it as a summer knees-up on the outskirts of Manchester kept falling through. Suddenly, a dream spot was available. The cavernous space of The Depot, just a few hundred yards from Homoelectric’s first venue, Follies, and within earshot of Piccadilly station, had broken free from red tape. In 2018, Warehouse Project, the big beast of Manchester clubbing, acquired the rights to host shows there. They were keen to assist in making Homobloc a reality, but aware enough to let it be established on Homoelectric’s terms, so as best to encourage discerning Mancunian clubbers who prize independence and authenticity. From the announcement on 10 July, the hype was deafening.

Continue reading...

50 great tracks for November from Dua Lipa, Destroyer, Selena Gomez and more

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Mon 4 Nov 2019 11:00 am

From Victoria Monét’s sublime R&B to Lanark Artefax’s squirming electronics, check out 50 new tracks and read about our 10 favourites

Continue reading...

Underworld: Drift Series One: Sampler Edition review – a year’s worth of inspiration

Delivered... Phil Mongredien | Scene | Sun 3 Nov 2019 6:30 am
(Caroline)

In the last century, when buying music used to necessitate a physical product, John Peel favourites the Wedding Present once pulled off the seemingly incredible feat of releasing a single a month for a year. The advent of streaming and downloading has rather raised the ante: Underworld have been releasing a song a week for the past year, and these are now collated in a seven-CD box set, with this standalone disc acting as an overview of the project.

The endeavour has clearly proved liberating, and prompted a renewed sense of creativity: after all, if one week’s effort fails to hit the mark, there’s not long to wait for it to be rectified by the next instalment. While considerations of space dictate that the sampler doesn’t include some of the most expansive cuts(the wonderfully sprawling Appleshine Continuum, a 34-minute collaboration with experimental jazz trio the Necks, is particularly ambitious), there is still plenty of boundary-pushing going on, from the propulsive Border Country to the atmospheric ambience of Brilliant Yes That Would Be. The standout is the dazzling STAR (Rebel Tech), in which Karl Hyde reimagines Janet and Allan Ahlberg’s children’s classic Each Peach Pear Plum via a rapid-fire stream of consciousness that replaces Mother Goose, Bo Peep et al with political heroes and popular cultural mainstays including David Beckham, the Dalai Lama and Dr Dre.

Continue reading...

Thunderdome: the Dutch rave with the world’s fastest, hardest music

Delivered... Holly Dicker | Scene | Wed 30 Oct 2019 3:30 pm

Thunderdome launched with a giant octopus on an ice rink – and created the Netherlands’ biggest youth culture movement. Three decades on, it’s stronger and tougher than ever

Last weekend, Thunderdome made history: 50,000 ravers massed at a convention centre in Utrecht for the biggest indoor hardcore dance event ever staged, breaking its own record set two years ago when it pulled off the mother of all comebacks, and reclaimed its crown as the world’s greatest living hardcore rave.

The site is mapped out like a theme park, with six areas of music ranging from the slower early rave sound of the “Thundergods” to the 200+ beats per minute blasting from the Tunnel of Terror. Tonight we’re paying homage to the most significant youth culture movement in the Netherlands, gabber, which is why there’s also a gabber museum, displaying limited-edition Nikes and multicoloured Australian-brand jackets – the gabber uniform – plus a tattoo station inking diehards with Thunderdome’s iconic Wizard logo, and a gabber barber serving up undercuts.

Continue reading...

Sudan Archives: Athena review – Afro futurism goes mainstream

Delivered... Kitty Empire | Scene | Sun 27 Oct 2019 5:30 am
(Stones Throw)

Although her name suggests a gem unearthed by the crate-digger label Awesome Tapes from Africa, Sudan Archives is an artist of now. Based in Los Angeles, the 24-year-old producer combines genre-defying sound with non-standard violin-playing and an Afro-futurist sensibility. Two previous EPs chart her journey from bedroom experiments with a loop station to fully realised, roots-inflected R&B tunes. So while Sudan Archives bears comparison to other queenly outliers like Solange or FKA Twigs, her sound has remained resolutely individual, informed by the electronic experiments of Cameroonian Francis Bebey.

On this debut album, Sudan’s sphere expands further. From the opening pizzicato plunk of Did You Know to the sultry distortions of Pelicans in the Summer, the variety of modes on offer has pixelated. Tracks like Confessions find western classical strings scything across a song about personal exile, while party grooves like Glorious boast a swirling north African motif on the fiddle. The album title takes its inspiration from Black Athena, a controversial scholastic work on the Egyptian influence on ancient Greece, though the songs often lean more towards the arty end of the mainstream, losing touch slightly with the startling radicalism of Sudan Archives’ early sound.

Continue reading...

The month’s best mixes: digital sludge, techno slammers and Kylie

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Wed 23 Oct 2019 3:21 pm

In our dispatches from the edges of dance culture, Florentino, Oli XL and Boomerang condense tracks into hyper-dense raves while Mx Silkman spreads out into dub

Oli XL — Lily Mix (on NTS)

Continue reading...

‘We’re an open wound’: São Paulo’s underground music scene

Delivered... Philip Bloomfield | Scene | Wed 23 Oct 2019 9:00 am

Brazil has long had countercultural music, but Jair Bolsonaro’s repressive presidency has made this community more determined than ever

‘When he got stabbed I just thought, we’re fucked. If he is alive, there is nothing we can do.” Brazilian journalist Amauri Gonzo is recalling the moment that he knew Jair Bolsonaro would be elected his country’s president. The stabbing of the far-right candidate seemed to confirm the picture of Brazil that Bolsonaro had been painting to voters: lawless, unsafe, and in need of a leader unafraid to meet violence with violence. Just two months later, in protest at five years dogged by economic crisis, corruption scandals and political turmoil, Brazil chose the openly racist, misogynistic, homophobic and anti-environmentalist former paratrooper as its leader. The underground musical community, which had come out in force against the extreme right candidate, was stunned. “It all went quiet,” says Gonzo, “like, ‘Oh, what do we do now?’”

Brazilian music might bring to mind the warm breeze of bossa nova, or a sound humid with the sweat of carnival, but a group of loosely connected São Paulo artists are making much harsher music to reflect, and resist, the Bolsonaro era, underlining values of community and artistic freedom.

Continue reading...

The month’s best mixes: downbeat digi-dub and intergalactic ambient

Delivered... Lauren Martin | Scene | Wed 2 Oct 2019 9:30 am

Israel Vines spotlights the sci-fi sounds of techno legend Jeff Mills, while Via App is on creepy, confrontational form

Deep Mind Music: Aos

Related: The month's best mixes: blood-pumping beats and meditative techno

Continue reading...

50 great tracks for October by Alicia Keys, DaBaby, Angel Olsen and more

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Tue 1 Oct 2019 10:00 am

An epic harp workout and an unearthed Japanese ambient gem sit alongside new rap from DaBaby and James Massiah in our playlist of the month’s best new music – read about our 10 favourites below

Continue reading...

Dance revolution: Has Boiler Room changed club culture forever?

Delivered... Nosheen Iqbal | Scene | Sat 28 Sep 2019 3:45 pm

After its online parties and DJ sets brought huge commercial success, the company is now preparing to launch its first ever festival next month

Six months ago Sherelle was ready to quit music for good, focus on the day job and give up the idea of being a professional DJ. Then her Boiler Room set happened. Fewer than 100 people were invited to see the 26-year-old play a studio in Hackney, but millions watched online; Sherelle went viral. The jungle and footwork music specialist is now one of the most talked about talents in club culture: two agents, her own record label, and a residency on BBC Radio 1 have followed.

“I amassed thousands of followers overnight,” she told the Observer. “Some of them were DJs and producers who I love and respected for years. My mind was blown.”

Boiler Room has always bridged the gap between championing the underground and making it accessible to see your favourite artists.

Continue reading...

Sturgill Simpson: Sound & Fury review – country’s outlaw catches fire

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 26 Sep 2019 12:00 pm

(Elektra Records)
Another big shift in direction for Simpson, with anime visuals, glam rock, disco and grunge ornamenting never-more-country lyrics: it’s extraordinary

It seems almost beside the point to note that Sturgill Simpson’s fourth album sounds nothing like its predecessors, as his previous three albums didn’t sound much like each other either. His self-funded 2013 debut, High Top Mountain, suggested the arrival of an arch-traditionalist, a former serviceman and railroad worker, whose vision of country music was rooted in that of artists who balked at Nashville’s tendency to slather everything in a coat of gloss: a defiantly retro reanimation of the late 70s “outlaw country” of Waylon Jennings or Hank Williams Jr. But its successor, Metamodern Sounds in Country Music, was a kind of psychedelic opus, sprinkled with paeans to LSD and DMT – “woke up this morning and decided to kill my ego … gonna break on through and blast off to the Bardo,” opened Just Let Go – frequently set to music that matched: Mellotron and wah-wah guitars, vocals drenched in spaced-out echo.

Continue reading...

Can a disco-house haven bring queer culture to Ibiza?

Delivered... Owen Myers | Scene | Mon 16 Sep 2019 9:00 am

Despite dance music’s roots in gay subculture, the island’s superclubs are overwhelmingly straight. Enter Glitterbox: a riot of bare buttocks, trans go-go dancers and, yes, glitter

When it comes to sparkle application, the women crewing up Glitterbox’s “glitter stations” are used to outlandish requests. “We’ve heard it all!” explains the scouse woman who is currently smearing specks of blue on my face. As a season-long employee of Ibiza’s most dazzling party of the decade, she has learned to set some ground rules. Long beards are a no-no, they use up too much product. And she recoils in mock horror at the thought of getting stuck into a hairy chest. “But girl’s chests are fine” she says.

Anything goes at Glitterbox, within reason. Birthed in Ibiza in 2014 and currently held at the superclub , the weekly house and disco night aims to distil the ephemeral hedonism of classic disco nights, such as New York’s Paradise Garage, with a little of Mudd Club’s scuffed-up edge, diverse bookings and a rotating phalanx of resplendent LGBTQ+ dancers. That’s a bold approach in Ibiza, the global epicentre for commercial dance that’s still dominated by older male DJs such as Carl Cox, Martin Garrix and, sadly, David Guetta, with his excruciatingly titled party Fuck Me I’m Famous. But the ethos is working for Glitterbox: punters pack out Hï’s 5,500 capacity every Sunday in the summer, and the night also hosts one-off events at London’s Ministry of Sound and New York’s House of Yes.

Continue reading...

Aphex Twin review – wild lights, jungle buzzsaw and a boo for Boris

Delivered... Lauren Martin | Scene | Sun 15 Sep 2019 1:45 pm

Printworks, London
The electronic music legend melted genres at breakneck speed in this peerless ambient-to-hardcore festival outing – to the delight of a young crowd

When Printworks opened to much hurrah two years ago, it did so during a run of venue closures in London. It’s aesthetically impressive and has quickly become one of the best venues for large-scale electronic events, and so is ripe for an Aphex Twin brain-tickle – even if free earplugs, sadly, aren’t on offer tonight. Although the musician has never relied on album cycles to draw in new audiences, it is striking how young the audience winding through Printworks is.

As well as releasing around a dozen EPs in the past decade on his own label, Rephlex, and Warp, there was mass excitement about Richard David James’s “return” as an album artist in 2014, with the Grammy award-winning Syro – and the memorable flight of a neon-green blimp bearing the Aphex Twin logo over London. Along with the weight of his back catalogue and mythical status, what makes shows such as these sell out in minutes is Aphex Twin’s love of spectacle and keen support for new electronic artists. The former is a perfect fit for this, the Red Bull music festival’s high concept (and budget). In terms of the latter, he’s viewed as a switched-on father figure to younger artists and fans, his hybrid set blending new club tracks with live modular jams, his own music, and ripe selections of 90s UK hardcore.

The lasers are, bluntly, crazy, an impressive sensory assault. It’s unabashedly fun, strangers craning their necks and grinning at each other

Related: Aphex Twin's best songs – ranked!

Continue reading...

Objekt: the pioneering producer uniting chinstrokers and ravers

Delivered... Kit Macdonald | Scene | Wed 11 Sep 2019 1:45 pm

TJ Hertz grew up without a clue electronic music existed. Now he’s the genre’s most cutting-edge star – but the studio still gives him the jitters

It is 4am on a balmy June night in Barcelona, and on a beachside stage at Primavera Sound festival, one of the finest talents in electronic music is leaping into the unknown. TJ Hertz, AKA Objekt, is one of the most beloved DJs and producers around. His tracks and albums routinely top end-of-year lists in the dance music press; their density and technique pleases the chinstrokers at the back, while their goofiness and fun gets hands in the air down the front.

And yet this is his first ever live set, a show he brings to the UK this week. Hertz stands behind a bank of equipment playing crystalline, deconstructed club music and singing through a vocoder while Ezra Miller, a young American visual artist, stands opposite triggering mesmeric visuals in time with the staccato beats and broken melodies.

Objekt and Ezra Miller play at the Islington Assembly Hall in London on 12 September.

Continue reading...
Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme