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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » dance-music


Natalie Portman criticises ‘creepy’ Moby over ‘disturbing’ account of friendship

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Wed 22 May 2019 10:16 am

Musician says in memoir the pair dated, but Portman disputes account, saying ‘my recollection is a much older man being creepy with me’

Natalie Portman has criticised Moby for a “very disturbing” account of their friendship in his new memoir Then It Fell Apart.

In the book, the musician, now 53, claims the pair dated when he was 33 and Portman was 20, after she met him backstage in Austin, Texas. He recounts going to parties in New York with her, and to see her at Harvard University, “kissing under the centuries-old oak trees. At midnight she brought me to her dorm room and we lay down next to each other on her small bed. After she fell asleep I carefully extracted myself from her arms and took a taxi back to my hotel.” He says that he then struggled with anxiety about their relationship: “It wanted one thing: for me to be alone … nothing triggered my panic attacks more than getting close to a woman I cared about.” Later, he writes: “For a few weeks I had tried to be Natalie’s boyfriend, but it hadn’t worked out,” writing that she called to tell him she had met someone else.

Related: Then It Fell Apart by Moby review – sex, drugs and self-loathing

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The month’s best mixes: steely funk, Lisbon tarraxo and hardcore psychedelia

Delivered... Lauren Martin | Scene | Tue 21 May 2019 1:00 pm

Our May selection features Job Sifre’s bitter electro, TSVI’s polyrhythms, and a trip down memory lane with Tama Sumo

Related: 'We're not beard-strokers!' Wigflex, Nottingham's 'rudeboy techno' night

Related: The month's best mixes: dancefloor stormers and experimental sidewinders

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Beats, rhymes and strife: how ravers raised the roof on mass protest

Delivered... Libby Brooks | Scene | Fri 17 May 2019 12:55 pm

A new film about Glasgow’s thumping 90s clubland traces a lineage of grassroots radicalism still thriving today

Beats is a gem of a film that has drawn attention not just for its exuberant depiction of early 1990s rave culture but the deeper questions it raises, 25 years on, about the legislation that criminalised the free party movement – and about how the UK pivoted from Reclaim the Streets, via Cool Britannia, to Brexit Britain.

Set in the summer of 1994, as the Criminal Justice Bill threatened to outlaw musical gatherings around “sounds wholly or predominantly characterised by the emission of a succession of repetitive beats”, the film charts the friendship – by turns madcap and tender – between teenagers Johnno and Spanner as they struggle to escape the restrictions of family and class on their West Lothian housing estate. With the help of a sisterly gang of older girls, the boys bounce into their local rave scene and soak up the ethic that “the only good system is a sound system, and if I can’t dance then it’s not my revolution”.

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‘We’re not beard-strokers!’ Wigflex, Nottingham’s ‘rudeboy techno’ night

Delivered... Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 3:47 pm

With its hotchpotch of electro, breakbeat and garage, Wigflex has become a beacon in Nottingham where ‘there’s not loads of things to do, so people come and forget their troubles’

When soulful singer-songwriter Yazmin Lacey first met Lukas Cole, AKA Lukas Wigflex, she told him his party didn’t sound appealing. “He’s like, ‘Yeah come down!’ And I told him I wasn’t really into that kind of music,” she says. “There’s not a lot of people I know running nights that would stand there at a house party and take that on the chin.”

Accepting a free ticket anyway, Lacey put her theory to the test, and lost. Still not always sold on techno, she’s now a Wigflex regular, lured on to the dancefloor by the open attitude and lack of black-clad affectation Nottingham’s most respected nocturnal session is known for.

Related: 10 of the best city music festivals in the UK for 2019

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‘We’re not beard-strokers!’ Wigflex, Nottingham’s ‘rudeboy techno’ night

Delivered... Martin Guttridge-Hewitt | Scene | Mon 13 May 2019 3:47 pm

With its hotchpotch of electro, breakbeat and garage, Wigflex has become a beacon in Nottingham where ‘there’s not loads of things to do, so people come and forget their troubles’

When soulful singer-songwriter Yazmin Lacey first met Lukas Cole, AKA Lukas Wigflex, she told him his party didn’t sound appealing. “He’s like, ‘Yeah come down!’ And I told him I wasn’t really into that kind of music,” she says. “There’s not a lot of people I know running nights that would stand there at a house party and take that on the chin.”

Accepting a free ticket anyway, Lacey put her theory to the test, and lost. Still not always sold on techno, she’s now a Wigflex regular, lured on to the dancefloor by the open attitude and lack of black-clad affectation Nottingham’s most respected nocturnal session is known for.

Related: 10 of the best city music festivals in the UK for 2019

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Holly Herndon: Proto review – dizzying beauty and bracing beats

Delivered... Emily Mackay | Scene | Sun 12 May 2019 8:00 am
(4AD)

Related: Holly Herndon: the musician who birthed an AI baby

It’s credit to Holly Herndon’s skill as a musical guide that her third album, though up to its elbows in complex ideas, feels so invigorating. Her boldest attempt yet to reconfigure modern dilemmas musical, technological and philosophical, it looks back, finding inspiration in the church choirs of her youth, and leaps forward, with a self-designed “AI baby” called Spawn – no android overlord, but just another member of her ensemble.

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50 great tracks for May from FKA twigs, Sunn O))), Stormzy and more

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 8 May 2019 6:00 am

From Bruce Springsteen’s return to Dorian Electra’s magnificent electropop – read about 10 of our favourite songs of the month and subscribe to our 50-track playlist of the best new music to start summer

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Automated techno: Eternal Flow generates dance music for you

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Mon 29 Apr 2019 4:52 pm

Techno, without all those pesky human producers? Petr Serkin’s Eternal Flow is a generative radio station – and even a portable device – able to make endless techno and deep house variations automatically.

You can run a simple version of Eternal Flow right in your browser:

https://eternal-flow.ru/

Recorded sessions are available on a SoundCloud account, as well:

But maybe the most interesting way to run this is in a self-contained portable device. It’s like a never-ending iPod of … well, kind of generic-sounding techno and deep house, depending on mode. Here’s a look at how it works; there’s no voiceover, but you can turn on subtitles for additional explanation:

There are real-world applications here: apart from interesting live performance scenarios, think workout dance music that follows you as you run, for example.

I talked to Moscow-based artist Petr about how this works. (And yeah, he has his own deep house-tinged record label, too.)

“I used to make deep and techno for a long period of time,” he tells us, “so I have some production patterns.” Basically, take those existing patterns, add some randomization, and instead of linear playback, you get material generated over a longer duration with additional variation.

There was more work involved, too. While the first version used one-shot snippets, “later I coded my own synth engine,” Petr tells us. That means the synthesized sounds save on sample space in the mobile version.

It’s important to note this isn’t machine learning – it’s good, old-fashioned generative music. And in fact this is something you could apply to your own work: instead of just keeping loads and loads of fixed patterns for a live set, you can use randomization and other rules to create more variation on the fly, freeing you up to play other parts live or make your recorded music less repetitive.

And this also points to a simple fact: machine learning doesn’t always generate the best results. We’ve had generative music algorithms for many years, which simply produce results based on simple rules. Laurie Spiegel’s ground-breaking Magic Mouse, considered by many to be the first-ever software synth, worked on this concept. So, too, did the Brian Eno – Peter Chilvers “Bloom,” which applied the same notion to ambient generative software and became the first major generative/never-ending iPhone music app.

By contrast, the death metal radio station I talked about last week works well partly because its results sound so raunchy and chaotic. But it doesn’t necessarily suit dance music as well. Just because neural network-based machine learning algorithms are in vogue right now doesn’t mean they will generate convincing musical results.

I suspect that generative music will freely mix these approaches, particularly as developers become more familiar with them.

But from the perspective of a human composer, this is an interesting exercise not necessarily because it puts yourself out of a job, but that it helps you to experiment with thinking about the structures and rules of your own musical ideas.

And, hey, if you’re tired of having to stay in the studio or DJ booth and not get to dance, this could solve that, too.

More:

http://eternal-flow.ru/

Now ‘AI’ takes on writing death metal, country music hits, more

Thanks to new media artist and researcher Helena Nikonole for the tip!

The post Automated techno: Eternal Flow generates dance music for you appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The month’s best mixes: dancefloor stormers and experimental sidewinders

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Mon 29 Apr 2019 10:00 am

Our April selection features springtime sounds by TTB, Rimarimba and Lucinda Chua alongside a thrilling DJ Taye mix

PPGMIX048: GiGi FM

Related: Raves, robots and writhing bodies: how electronic music rewired the world

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The Chemical Brothers: ‘People were crying because they hated us so much’

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 18 Apr 2019 3:00 pm

Three decades after their inauspicious start, Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons think the spirit of 90s rave culture, as captured on their new album, can help heal Brexit wounds

In a west London pub on a Wednesday lunchtime, the Chemical Brothers are taking a break from preparing for the smallest DJ gig of their recent careers. Twenty-seven years since they began playing records together as students in Manchester, under the unfortunate and short-lived pseudonym the 237 Turbo Nutters, Tom Rowlands and Ed Simons’ forays into DJing usually take place on the grand scale of their spectacular festival headline sets. Such huge gigs have become useful circumstances for road-testing new material: the pair knew they were on to a winner with Eve of Destruction – the bizarrely effective blend of apocalyptic 2019 paranoia, early Chicago house and disco samples that opens their new album, No Geography – after playing an early version to a vast crowd in Europe. “We’re always searching,” as Rowlands puts it, “for that feeling of intensity and … waaaaah!”

But, in a few days’ time, they are returning to their roots: the days when, Simons says, “we would be crammed in a tiny booth with people everywhere, no barrier, so people would just wander in and start cheering and screaming at you”. They are DJing for a grand total of 250 people at the Social, the central London bar/venue run by the record label Heavenly. As part of the efforts to save the venue – then under threat from rising rents – they offered to play the same kind of set they played 25 years ago at the Sunday Social, the hugely influential club night also run by Heavenly, in the basement of the Albany pub on nearby Great Portland Street, where the pair were resident DJs. The preparations have brought their own challenges. “I’ve been going through the old record bags that we used at the time, pulling out a 12in, then going to digitise it so we can play it again and finding I can’t because the record’s literally got a boot print across it,” says Rowlands, frowning.

Related: The Chemical Brothers: No Geography review – revitalised back-to-skool anthems

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‘It’s an absurd profession’: the world’s most infamous bouncers tell all

Delivered... Maya-Roisin Slater | Scene | Tue 16 Apr 2019 9:00 am

They have a fearsome reputation for excluding eager clubbers – but as a documentary about Berlin’s doormen is released, three of them explain why their policies are ‘all about tolerance’

The door policies for Berlin’s nightclubs are some of the most talked about in the world. Online forums detail appropriate clothing, what to say and how to act in line in order to get in. In the German capital, bouncers don’t just play the role of security, but also curator, sussing out who can handle the extreme depths of hedonism and who might gawk or yuck at what they see.

Today, far removed from the sexual freedom, relentless techno and ample substance use that defines Berlin’s nightlife, I’m sitting in a plain white room with grey carpet and unforgiving lights. Across from me are three men who’ve become infamous for this curation, playing a key part in creating the renowned and secretive door policies. They’re the subject of a new documentary, Berlin Bouncer, by German film-maker David Dietl: a humanising look at people who have reached this bizarre level of celebrity.

Related: 'It's anarchy and hedonism': Janus, the club night that reinvented Berlin

Related: Berlin government pledges €1m to soundproof city's nightclubs

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Raves, robots and writhing bodies: how electronic music rewired the world

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Mon 15 Apr 2019 6:00 am

It started with white-coated boffins; now its figureheads wear masks and play Vegas. A new exhibition tells the story of electronic dance music, from old synths to a statue of Brian Eno

In the Philharmonie de Paris on an overcast Tuesday afternoon, Jean-Yves Leloup is pondering why what may be the most comprehensive exhibition ever assembled about the history of electronic music is taking place in France’s capital. “I don’t understand why the Germans or the British didn’t do it before,” he shrugs. “But we have a history of electronic music in France, from musique concrète to Jean-Michel Jarre to Cerrone and cosmic disco, the French touch with Daft Punk, now some EDM pop stars.

“Maybe we gravitate to electronic music because it’s not too rock’n’roll orientated, which is the property of Anglo-Saxons. The French have always been told that they can’t sing in English very well or that French doesn’t sound good with rock’n’roll, so I guess that’s the thing. It’s a bit of a mystery for me – I’m French, so it’s hard to have an outside perspective.”

Daft Punk say that Daft Punk is like a fiction, a movie that they’re directing every day

Electro: From Kraftwerk to Daft Punk is at the Philarmonie de Paris until 11 August.

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Cybotron review – a gloriously disreputable hi-tech rave

Delivered... Joe Muggs | Scene | Sun 14 Apr 2019 4:05 pm

Barbican, London
Detroit techno maverick Juan Atkins and his reshaped 1980s group turn the concert hall into the dancefloor in their first gig ever

Both of Orbital here, a couple of Rinse FM residents there, Trevor Jackson over there: the Barbican foyer is an absolute scrum of London’s dance music community, all in a state of excitement. For a certain demographic, Juan Atkins’s Cybotron are as fundamental and foundational as any act in music. The 1983 single Techno City gave its name to a genre that would take over the world and define Detroit as its spiritual home. But for all their influence, and for all that Atkins has continued making music in various guises – most notably as Model 500 – they’ve never before done a live show.

This is a new permutation of Cybotron. In place of original members Richard “3070” Davis and John Housely, Atkins is joined by his long-time collaborator the German techno aristocrat Laurens von Oswald, and by fellow Detroiter Tameko J Williams, AKA DJ Maaco. As the moody drone of Industrial Lies thrums, the three come on stage one by one, dressed in matching boiler suits and a sci-fi version of welding masks, as lasers trace out geometrical patterns on the vast projection screen behind. It is a nice summation of techno’s roots: inspiration from the production-line aesthetic of Motor City’s car plants, and afrofuturist dreams of motherships and technological emancipation.

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Robyn review – soars to new levels of dance-pop perfection

Delivered... Michael Cragg | Scene | Sun 14 Apr 2019 11:58 am

Alexandra Palace, London
The Swedish singer commands the 10,000-strong crowd with a perfectly pitched set ranging from club anthems to her latest heartbreaking classics

Pop thrives on the push and pull of delayed gratification, and the release, when it comes, is overwhelming. This intoxicating sensation runs through the 2018 album Honey, Robyn’s first in eight years. She reshaped the pop landscape with tear- and sweat-stained emo-bangers on her 2010 Body Talk series, influencing everyone from Katy Perry to a raft of fellow Swedes. With Honey, Robyn offered something more languid, the pop highs represented by undulating ripples rather than crashing waves.

Tonight, she makes the 10,000-strong heaving mass wait. In fact, for the first 90 seconds of the gently pulsating Send to Robin Immediately [sic], she isn’t even on stage. She appears only as the beat starts to throb, and even then she stands stock-still as gauzy, white fabric billows around a giant statue of caressing hands. The tension doesn’t snap until the third song, Indestructible, initiated by an expertly timed clap. From that moment on, the crowd are in the palm of her hands, as each song bleeds into the next like an immaculately crafted DJ set aimed at puncturing and then suturing the heart. The coiled frustration of Be Mine, during which Robyn yanks down a sheet that had acted as the final barrier between her and her sweaty disciples, rubs shoulders with the upbeat Ever Again, while the disco-tinged Because It’s in the Music (“and it makes me want to cry”) is healed by the groove-lead balm of Between the Lines.

Related: How Robyn transformed pop

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Avicii’s family announce posthumous album by Swedish DJ

Delivered... Laura Snapes | Scene | Fri 5 Apr 2019 4:28 pm

The EDM star’s final album will feature artists including Coldplay’s Chris Martin and Aloe Blacc

The family of Avicii have announced a posthumous album from the late Swedish DJ. At the time of his death from suicide in April 2018, at the age of 28, Tim Bergling was close to completing his third album. His family report he left behind “a collection of nearly finished songs, along with notes, email conversations and text messages about the music”.

Executives from Bergling’s label, Universal Music, asked his regular collaborators rather than invite superstar names to be part of the project, according to the New York Times. The highest-profile musician on the album, Chris Martin of Coldplay, had worked with Bergling and was invited to sing on a song named Heaven.

Related: 'It will kill me' – behind the devastating Avicii documentary

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