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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » MIDI


Refraktions 2.2 brings you a lot more MIDI

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Thu 4 Jan 2018 2:02 am

It feels like there’s been a lot of generative stuff so far in 2018. Ok, it’s only two posts, but they’re both about generative apps. First Wotja, now Refraktions. If you don’t know what Refraktions is, it’s an 8-track generative MIDI sequencer with ‘artificial intelligence’ (whatever it is that that really means), that apparently processes input over time to create loops tailored to each individual user. I’ve not tried it, so I can’t comment personally on that front.

Anyway, in version 2.2 the developer has added quite a lot of new stuff, and a lot of it is centred around MIDI. Here’s all that’s new:

  • Audiobus 3.0.2 added. Refraktions is available as an Audio Source, MIDI Source, and MIDI Filter.
  • App can now receive note input from external MIDI controllers or other iOS apps (as destination “Refraktions”).
  • Play / pause functionality added by tapping center circle.
  • Added 8th synth, “Coastal Synth.”
  • Added ability to change root key in musical scales.
  • Added per-track customization of playback, composition, volume, and pitch.
  • Added global and per-track customization of MIDI sources and destinations.
  • Added shake detection, which rearranges the composition.
  • Improved note creation, including fixes to MIDI on / off for each tap.
  • Rebuilt internal metronome with average drift variance of < 0.7 ms.
  • Switch from UserDefaults to CoreData for data storage.

Refraktions is on the app store and costs $6.99:

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Sequle brings musical scales based sequencing to your iOS workflow

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sun 24 Dec 2017 11:20 pm

Sequle is musical scales based sequencing app. It uses musical scales theory to produce notes for MIDI-interface.

It has six tracks with note lengths, velocities and transpose. Tracks can have invidual pattern lengths and speeds. Song mode for more melodic performances. Minor and major scale and global transpose. It can be clocked either internally or from MIDI clock.

Using scales instead of specific notes makes everything sound good and it gives you more space to just play with the sounds get inspired easily.
Use note length and velocity to create rhytmical melodies. Vary pattern length to create polyrythmic sequences.

This app works with Camera Connection kit and most of the USB->MIDI converters.

The app is free to download but it has a limited playing time. You can purchase the full version with in-app purchase option and support the development.

Sequle is free on the app store, but the full version is an IAP away:

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Quick tip: how the Roland SH-01A and TR-08 trigger work

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 19 Dec 2017 4:25 am

A defining feature of the original SH-101 was its ability to take trigger ins as clock. Here’s what that means and how to use it on the new Roland SH-01A.

We often hear that cliché about how useful restrictions can be in music. But the key is to make those limitations interesting. So, here, instead of having an endlessly repeating step sequence that loops on every bar, we can quickly produce syncopations and polyrhythms. That’s a whole lot of fun when you’re jamming live onstage or in the studio, because it lets you quickly create something asymmetrical and add variety.

Normally how a step sequencer advances is from one step to the next. You can sync that to external clock, but each step advances at the same rate. The clever thing about the SH-101 and now the SH-01A is that you can trigger the move from one step to the next externally.

Any trigger signal will work, but here let’s use the trigger output on the TR-08. The TR-08 has a dedicated trigger part, so you can sequence any pattern you want. (Those of you with Eurorack setups and the like can get fancier from here, if you so choose.)

Let’s watch this in action:

Some tips:

  • Any monophonic minijack cable will work to connect the two pieces of gear.
  • Now that the SH-01A adds polyphony, you can also use this trick to create sequences of chords, not just monophonic melodies as here.
  • Remember that even with a signal routed to the external clock in jack on the SH-01A, you still have to press the play button on the 01A sequencer.

Roland SH-01A

Roland TR-08

Previously:
Video hands-on: jamming with the TR-08 and SH-01A is lots of fun

What you need to know about the Roland Boutique 101, 808 reboots

The post Quick tip: how the Roland SH-01A and TR-08 trigger work appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Elastic FX lets you route and morph 32 effects on iOS, for $7

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 14 Dec 2017 5:23 pm

It looks a bit like what would happen if an iPad, a KAOSS Pad, and a plug-in folder had a love child. It’s the new iOS app from the makers of Elastic Drums.

Elastic Drums already had won fans as the indie-developed drum synth / production app released by Mouse on Mars. And inside Elastic Drums, you had a powerful range of effects. So, at some point, lead developer Oliver Greschke had the idea of taking all those effects, and making a standalone multi-effects processor for the iPad.

The result you get, though, is a fully spec’ed-out sound processing powerhouse for iOS: Elastic FX. If you were already using Elastic Drums, you’ll like these effects, too – but now they’ve been reworked, and provide stereo processing (not just mono). You’ll find new effects, too, plus all-new routing options and feedback.

And if you haven’t used Elastic Drums before, Elastic FX promises straight out of the gate to be one of the leading options for processing effects on the iPad.

There are 32 available effects, including modulation, pitch, distortion, filter, delay, reverb, and more.

From those 32 effects, you can assign to one of four effect units.

It’s that four-effect unit that opens up more possibilities. Choose how to route between effects, add feedback, then adjust parameters all at once via X/Y pad (KAOSS-style). That X/Y pad also has phrase recording and automation, of 1-8 bars in length.

There’s additionally a master effects section (which adds 3-band EQ, compressor, and stutter).

From there, you’ve got a load of options to integrate this with your mobile studio:

  • Audiobus 3, Inter-App Audio for working with other apps’ audio (in/out)
  • A built-in audio player so you can quickly audition effects
  • Ableton Link support for jamming and sync, plus time-synced phrase playback and tempo-synced effects (like the delay)
  • Save, load, share user presets
  • MIDI, MIDI learn for parameter control
  • MIDI program change for changing presets

Intro price, iPad only: 7.99€ / US$6.99

http://mominstruments.com/efx/

Demo videos:

And check out this synced-up automation:

The post Elastic FX lets you route and morph 32 effects on iOS, for $7 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Design By Paul releases their first poly synth, called, PolySynth

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Thu 14 Dec 2017 12:59 am

DesignByPaul has brought us quite a few interesting apps since they first set up on the app store. Now they’ve introduced PolySynth, their first polyphonic synthesizer with only 3 note polyphony but apparently packed with vintage analog character.

PolySynth has Audiobus 3 support, IAA (Inter-App Audio) and MIDI-In so you can connect, play and record with other apps.

Main app features:

  • Microtonal tuning
  • 3 note polyphony
  • MIDI note in
  • 24db/Oct MS20 Lowpass filter and resonant highpass
  • Arpeggiator
  • AudioBus
  • Inter App Audio
  • 3x oscillators
  • 2x LFOs
  • 2x ADSR envelopes
  • Delay

PolySynth is an iPad only synth, and costs $4.99 on the app store now:

The post Design By Paul releases their first poly synth, called, PolySynth appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

AC Sabre adds Multi-dimensional Polyphonic Expression support and more in version 1.2

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Mon 4 Dec 2017 8:34 pm

AC Sabre has been around for a little while now. When it first arrived it changed how many people looked at an iOS device in terms of performance potential. One of the first times I came into contact with the AC Sabre was at a Heart n Soul SoundLab event where we invited the creator and developer of the AC Sabre to bring it along and show some of our artists just how it worked. That was back in July of last year and went really well (you can find out about it here). Since then the app has only been updated once with the introduction of AC Central back in May this year.

Now in release 1.2, AC Sabre takes a few more very interesting steps. In this release we get MPE (Multi-dimensional Polyphonic Expression) support, which only a few apps have take on so far, although you might be surprised by some that have. For instance:

All in all not a bad list. I also believe that Zeeon has added MPE support only recently, and of course today AC Sabre gets added to the list as well.

But there’s more in version 1.2 than just MPE support. It also has a new “Guitarist” panel set with POWER CHORDS, the vertical pluck axis fixed, and of course, no update would be complete without the obligatory bug fixes.

 

It’s definitely worth checking out AC Sabre if you haven’t already taken a look there’s one last thing to mention. It’s also on sale right now and down from its normal price of $9.99 to just $4.99.

AC Sabre is on the app store right now for just $4.99:

The post AC Sabre adds Multi-dimensional Polyphonic Expression support and more in version 1.2 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

StepPolyArp – Midi Arpeggiator 3 lands and brings a big batch of updates and tweaks

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sat 18 Nov 2017 6:44 pm

StepPolyArp – Midi Arpeggiator has been around for a while now. In fact it launched on the app store back in 2010. Now it’s moved up to version 3.0 which comes with a big set of updates and improvements.

If you don’t know here’s what it does in a nutshell:

StepPolyArp is a real-time Midi arpeggiator to control Midi instruments, sequencers like Logic, Cubase, Live, and all other Midi sequencers, or even other virtual instruments installed on the same iPad. The arpeggiator can automatically generate melodic patterns from notes or chords played in real time.

And here’s everything that’s new in version 3.0:

  • Polyrhythm lines
  • iOS 11 support
  • Resizable Keyboard
  • Keyboard is scrollable from the bottom area
  • Presets available from “Files” application
  • Full support of “Split View” and “Slide Over”
  • Graphics and user interface improvements
  • Option to retrig the position of a pattern when launching
  • The scale can be saved with pattern
  • Open presets created from version 1.x and 2.x
  • Added a drum kit in the internal sounds
  • Added new presets

StepPolyArp is on the app store and costs $14.99:

The post StepPolyArp – Midi Arpeggiator 3 lands and brings a big batch of updates and tweaks appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

apeFilter 2.3 brings a new AB MIDI port and more

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sat 18 Nov 2017 3:41 pm

apeFilter is an unusual app to say the least. It is a sophisticated Equaliser, with it’s DSP is based on the Biquad / Cascade filters. It’s a useful app for sculpting your sound and can be used via Audiobus or via Inter App Audio. apeFilter also works as an Audio Unit and has Ableton Link.

In version 2.3 here’s what’s new:

  • Audiobus 3 New MIDI Receiver Port
  • New Quick View for the Presets Manager, simplify the Presets navigation while playing the Keyboard
  • AUv3: App Presets sharing
  • AUv3: LFO Start/Stop bug fixed for multiple instances
  • New implementation for LFO which improve performance when you put app in background or switch app etc..
  • Midibus 1.39 SDK
  • Audiobus 3.0.3 SDK
  • Ableton LINK 2.1.2 SDK
  • Removed MIDI Clock Receiving
  • Disable Auto-Lock Screen
  • iPhone X compatibility

apeFilter is on the app store and costs $5.99:

The post apeFilter 2.3 brings a new AB MIDI port and more appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Two new ways to integrate MeeBlip triode synths with Ableton Live, free

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Nov 2017 7:15 pm

Software control means preset recall and easy automation, on top of all that tactile control. Here’s the latest combination of our MeeBlip and Max for Live.

I don’t know exactly what astrological event causes people to decide to want to create controller layouts in Max for Live for the MeeBlip triode. But whatever it is, two friends wrote me last night from two different hemispheres to say they’d decided that they needed to create a tool for using their MeeBlip monosynths. And, with no contact with one another, they both released their work within a few hours.

Here’s what that means for you.

MeeBlip triode is our affordable, red-colored hardware synth with a friendly, edgy voice and analog filter. And we’re down to the end of this run, but … there are a few left. Plus, nice timing (they really didn’t know this) – we’ve just started our Black Friday sale early, with all the free cables you need and free North American shipping.

Ableton Live, so long as you’ve got Live Suite (that is, Max for Live included), lets you include devices that control hardware synths. Since everything you see on the front panel of triode can be controlled by MIDI – plus a few things that aren’t even there – using these add-ons lets you automate and store and recall presets.

Why would you want to do that, given you’ve already got this box with knobs and switches? Well, you might want to store and recall presets with a particular Live project, so your ‘blip is sounding the same way when you load it up and get back to work, or to save a sound you really like. And you might want to use Live’s automation controls to sculpt your sound as part of a pattern, by drawing it in or using Push hardware.

And from there, you can add additional features, like randomization.

Both of these devices are free, so you can grab both and see which you like best. From South American virtuoso hypergeek Gustavo Bravetti, comes a cute, color-coordinated design. It looks nicest, and also includes full resend, a helper for drawing envelopes, and more:

Triode CTRL 1.0

Don’t miss Gustavo’s amazing performances and so on via his Facebook artist page.

And in this corner:

Kent Williams aka Chaircrusher has made something that isn’t quite as pretty. But two nice things about it: one, you get a randomization feature. Two, as it’s based on previous, similar work, it might be a way to learn how to make these for yourself. Since the MeeBlip is nice and simple, it makes a great template.

Meeblip Triode Control 0.01

Kent’s also an awesome musician, so check out:
https://chaircrusher.bandcamp.com/

What? You don’t have a triode?

We can help.

Let’s start Black Friday early. Let’s start your holiday shopping season early – by making sure you (or a lucky person who’s getting a triode gift) gets all the cables the triode needs.

So now, triode includes our audio & MIDI cable bundle ($24.95 value) until November 30, or while supplies last. Free shipping in the USA. As always, our power adapter is included. And this on top of our new everyday US$119.95 price.

Have at it:

Get a MeeBlip triode synth

Previously:

Here’s how MeeBlip can get you started with hardware synths

Some of our favorite MeeBlip triode synth jams

The post Two new ways to integrate MeeBlip triode synths with Ableton Live, free appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Two sequenced Max for Live devices go off the usual grid

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 7 Nov 2017 12:03 am

Will a step sequencer be a tool just for expected repetition? Or can it take you somewhere different? A series called “Out Of Grid” aims for the latter.

There are certainly plenty of step sequencers and sequenced devices for Max for Live, let alone for music software in general. The angle in MOOR and Twistor is to help you produce more pattern variation and irregularity right from the get-go. The notion: 16 steps? Two bars? Why not change step length and randomize steps and set custom dividers and multipliers? And why not play all of that in real-time?

The two tools for Max for Live come from K-Devices and composer-founder Alessio Santini, who has already been busy making oddball music tools for Live and iOS.

You’ll probably want to crack the manual, unless you’re just going for straight-up IDM chaos. But once you do, you’ll discover that Cardassian-like user interface belies some clever tools for getting you out of the usual step-by-step monotony. There are two tools: MOOR is a mono step sequencer for creating patterns of notes, and Twistor outputs modulation to other bits of Ableton Live. That is, MOOR won’t make any sound until you hook it up to a soft synth, and Twistor only when you wire up parameters of some other device. But then, you’re given a wealth of options for mangling the patterns as you create them.

The center of Moor’s interface will look immediately familiar: it’s just the vanilla steps with note values. Where the irregularity comes in is, you can then opt for different time divisions, and a global multiplier for arbitrarily modulating the overall length. You can do that live, including with automation, making for some crazy possibilities. If a global multiplier and timing division weren’t enough, you can additionally modulate individual steps as a percentage of the whole.

Oh yeah, and the playhead doesn’t have to move steadily across the sequence, linear style – while it may never have occurred to you before to even try this, you can opt for exponential or logarithmic curves, too. There are per-step chance values and extensive randomization options.

Basically, even if you start mashing around the controls or load some of the many included presets, you can immediately start producing mangled, complex patterns.

When you’ve got a pattern you like, you can simply let it run from this Device, or drag and drop MIDI clips to your Session.

Moor spits out mono notes, but its sibling Twistor simply outputs modulation, which you can then use to target the parameter of another Ableton Live device of your choosing. Appropriate to that choice, Twistor also provides various choices for shaping interpolation of the signal between steps.

(Live 10 will bring more modulation routing options, so hopefully K-Devices will consider polyphonic models before that’s out.)

Both tools store snapshots, each of which can also be triggered via automation or MIDI.

So everything can be “played live. Where they’re really fun is once you add a controller then. The easiest way to do that, of course, is Ableton Push. In fact, to me it’s really with Push that this all starts making sense – the whole architecture of K-Devices’ work here is really built around real-time modulation, so getting your hands on the step programming and dialing in variations is perfect.

Whether you’ve something complex in mind or just want to scramble some patterns that have gotten dull, they’re both really compelling tools. Moor is US$34; Twistor is $22.

I’ve been playing with them a bit. If you always loved messing with step sequencer chance and length parameters, these are definitely for you.

CDM special: K-Devices wrote to offer up a special discount coupon for CDM readers. Through Monday, November 13, though, you get a special discount off the bundle. Add both products, then enter that code on checkout, and the two are discounted to 29€˘instead of 39€.

Code: koog17

More: www.k-devices.com

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If SysEx management via iOS is important then you need to check out Midi Quest

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sun 5 Nov 2017 8:50 pm

If you’re using hardware then you know what I’m talking about. SysEx management is something really useful, and being able to manage via iOS is extra handy too. MidiQuesti describes itself as “Unparalleled SysEx Management for MIDI Hardware”. Which is a very big claim indeed, but reading through the app’s description, and it might just have something.

According to the developer, Midi Quest supports over 630 of the most popular MIDI instruments and other devices from over 50 different manufacturers including Korg, Roland, Yamaha, Kurzweil, Alesis, Waldorf, Kawai, Akai, and E-mu, and is able to store, organize, and edit banks and the individual patches, combinations, multis, performances, drums settings, and other SysEx loaded from your MIDI hardware. Apparently Midi Quest is a true multi-instrument editor/librarian designed from the ground up to effectively support multiple MIDI ports, multiple manufacturers, and multiple MIDI devices. So if you have a lot of external hardware this could be exactly what you need. That is if you want to use iOS for SysEx management anyway.

Here’s the full app’s description so you can see if this is going to be an app you want to use:

Midi Quest “talks” to each MIDI device individually so it can simultaneously send SysEx to as many as 250 different instruments and still edit another instrument – all at the same time. Try doing that with any other editor/librarian…

Midi Quest is not a panel editor. Midi Quest is a professional, integrated system capable of fully managing, editing, and organizing the simplest to the most complex workstation class MIDI devices and hardware synthesizers such as Korg’s flagship workstation, the Kronos.

Midi Quest natively reads and writes industry standard .syx and .mid files so that you can easily take advantage of SysEx downloaded from the internet or received from a friend.

Midi Quest for iPad imports Set, Collection, individual Patch, and individual Bank files from Mac and Windows versions of Midi Quest so existing SysEx can easily be stored and edited on an iPad.

Midi Quest can store an entire studio configuration – in a single file.

First, what every editor/librarian should have (but may not)… Midi Quest will easily handle all of your bank editing tasks. Copy and Paste, Swap, or Insert single or multiple patches within the same bank or with other banks using menu commands or drag and drop. Along with a dozen other standard commands to rename, sort, shift patches, and so on. 1-tap audition automatically sends selected patches.

Midi Quest’s unique and powerful bank editing capabilities are highlighted in multi-timbral instruments with parent/child linked editing and display.

Just like its bank editors, Midi Quest’s parameter editors cover all of the basics with the features you expect – multiple ways to edit each parameter: grab and drag editing, extended popup editing, and true rotary knob editing. Unlike most panel editors, Midi Quest can retrieve and display all of the current values of all parameters. Of course, Midi Quest performs edits in real time so the instrument immediately reflects the changes made on screen. It also offers a range of both manual and automatic auditioning options.

Scale each editor to a customizable size (up to 3X) so editing is fast and easy.

Along with the editor’s many features, take advantage of the Block Copy/Swap options which allows for the selection of a logical group of parameters such as an envelope, oscillator, effect, or LFO and copy/swap them within the same patch, or a different patch.

Midi Quest is not just for the patch tweaker. Midi Quest has many users who have never created a new patch by editing individual parameters. Their secret is Midi Quest’s five different patch generators: Mix, Blend, Mix All, Morph, and Gen 4. Each takes existing sounds and combines them in different ways to create entire banks of new sounds in a matter of seconds. This type of experimentation, without Midi Quest, would require days but with Midi Quest there are results in seconds.

Looking for new inspiration? Looking for a sound but no time for programming? Midi Quest has the answer for you. Sound Quest’s latest patch collection contains over 180,000 unique patches and is now accessible to everyone with Midi Quest using the unique Patch Zone view. This context sensitive view tracks the instrument and type of SysEx and automatically lists the available patches.

MidiQuesti is free to download on the app store, but requires IAPs for devices, which comes as no surprise really.

The post If SysEx management via iOS is important then you need to check out Midi Quest appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

iOptigan brings you an iOS recreation of the optical organ from the 1970s

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Fri 3 Nov 2017 7:53 am

I have to admit to loving these kinds of recreations of novel and unusual instruments from the past. The more retro the better. iOptigan is a recreation of the Optigan, short for Optical Organ, which was apparently a chord organ from the early 1970’s. The Optigan (Optical Organ) is remembered today for its unique system of sound reproduction using optical discs. These LP-sized film discs were optically encoded with 57 concentric tracks, which contained loops of musical combos playing chord patterns in different styles.

Each disc contained a specific style of music (Bossa Nova, Big Band etc) which the user could control by pressing the chord buttons. Changing the discs was as simple as putting a new record on your turntable. Think of it as the 1971 version of GarageBand.

I had never heard of the Optigan to be honest, but it sounds awesome in a very retro and not entirely useful way. Apparently, despite the Optigan’s novel technology, it’s scratchy sound left a lot to be desired. According to the iOptigan’s developer, they’ve aimed to “truthfully recreates that lo-fi sound”. Also, 25 of the original 40 Optigan discs are included with the app itself, if you’re a real fan then you can get the remaining 15 discs, which can be purchased individually or all together in the Complete Pak.

Let’s take a look at the iOptigan’s features (which seem to have gone far in advance of what I’m guessing the original instrument could do):

  • Disc loading rigth-side-up or upside-down
  • Spring Reverb (virtual)
  • Optical Metronome
  • Audio Demo for each Disc
  • MIDI in/out
  • MIDI chord detection
  • MIDI File Import
  • Sequencer with Record and Playback
  • Sharing for songs as Audio and MIDI File
  • iTunes File Sharing
  • Inter-App Audio
  • Smart background audio
  • Help overlay
  • Headphone optimised stereo (optional)
  • Radio Mode for Chord Buttons or Keyboard
  • Comfortable speed control in semitones or BPM

iOptigan can be found on the app store priced at $4.99 (IAPs are on top of that):

The post iOptigan brings you an iOS recreation of the optical organ from the 1970s appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

iOptigan brings you an iOS recreation of the optical organ from the 1970s

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Fri 3 Nov 2017 7:53 am

I have to admit to loving these kinds of recreations of novel and unusual instruments from the past. The more retro the better. iOptigan is a recreation of the Optigan, short for Optical Organ, which was apparently a chord organ from the early 1970’s. The Optigan (Optical Organ) is remembered today for its unique system of sound reproduction using optical discs. These LP-sized film discs were optically encoded with 57 concentric tracks, which contained loops of musical combos playing chord patterns in different styles.

Each disc contained a specific style of music (Bossa Nova, Big Band etc) which the user could control by pressing the chord buttons. Changing the discs was as simple as putting a new record on your turntable. Think of it as the 1971 version of GarageBand.

I had never heard of the Optigan to be honest, but it sounds awesome in a very retro and not entirely useful way. Apparently, despite the Optigan’s novel technology, it’s scratchy sound left a lot to be desired. According to the iOptigan’s developer, they’ve aimed to “truthfully recreates that lo-fi sound”. Also, 25 of the original 40 Optigan discs are included with the app itself, if you’re a real fan then you can get the remaining 15 discs, which can be purchased individually or all together in the Complete Pak.

Let’s take a look at the iOptigan’s features (which seem to have gone far in advance of what I’m guessing the original instrument could do):

  • Disc loading rigth-side-up or upside-down
  • Spring Reverb (virtual)
  • Optical Metronome
  • Audio Demo for each Disc
  • MIDI in/out
  • MIDI chord detection
  • MIDI File Import
  • Sequencer with Record and Playback
  • Sharing for songs as Audio and MIDI File
  • iTunes File Sharing
  • Inter-App Audio
  • Smart background audio
  • Help overlay
  • Headphone optimised stereo (optional)
  • Radio Mode for Chord Buttons or Keyboard
  • Comfortable speed control in semitones or BPM

iOptigan can be found on the app store priced at $4.99 (IAPs are on top of that):

The post iOptigan brings you an iOS recreation of the optical organ from the 1970s appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Squarp have made a deep 8-track sequencer for your Eurorack

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 27 Oct 2017 10:57 pm

Squarp, makers of a high-end desktop sequencer, have now gone modular. The Hermod is a deep, patchable sequencer for your Eurorack – coming early 2018.

It’s likely the first of more of this sort of thing we’re going to see soon: pack a module with a powerful brain (ARM, the same processor architecture powering phones and tablets and so on).

The Hermod has patch connections to spare, whether MIDI, USB host, or analog voltage. And there’s a friendly-looking sequencer, with some computer-like functions – including real-time pattern effects.

Of course, the catch is you could take the $450 / 380€ it costs and, right now, pick up an audio interface that lets you interface a computer with the same. But then, all those connections could be handy – and it does look nice. Full specs are out now:

Core player

● Number of tracks: 8
● Number of sequences: 8
● Number of projects: unlimited
● Number of events (notes, automation) per project: ~40000
● Track length: 1/4 bar to 16 bars
● Recording resolution: 24ppqn
● Tempo: 40 to 250 BPM

Tracks

● Maximum number of notes per step (polyphony): 8
● Maximum number of effects per track: 8
● Note pitch: C0 to B9
● Note velocity: 0 to 127
● Note width: 1/24th to 16 bars
● Zoom: x1 (1 step = 1 quarter notes) to x8 (1 step = 1/32th note)

Inputs

● MIDI (to control Hermod with a MIDI controller)
● USB host (to control Hermod with a computer)
● USB device (to control Hermod with an USB controller)
● 4x CV in [-5V to +5V] (to control Hermod with CV/GATE notes, CV modulation, clock)

Outputs

● MIDI (up to 8 channels)
● USB host
● USB device
● 8x CV out [-5V to +5V]
● 8x GATE out [0V to +5V]

User interface

● 16 backlit silicon button pads
● Menu clickable encoder
● White backlit high contrast LCD screen
● 8x RGB LEDS to display the CV/GATE voltages
● MicroSD card slot to save your projects and upgrade the OS (SD card included)

Other

● CPU: 216MHz ARM Cortex-M7
● DAC resolution: 16-bit
● ADC resolution: 12-bit
● Width: 24HP (up to 30mm in depth)
● Requires a ±12V eurorack supply (consume 310mA from the +12V rail and 30mA from the -12V rail)

Hermod is engineered in Paris and assembled in France.

http://squarp.net/hermod

The post Squarp have made a deep 8-track sequencer for your Eurorack appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

sequencism is a new sketchbook for creating short and simple tracks

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 17 Oct 2017 11:18 pm

It’s always good to welcome a new app to the mobile music community, especially one that claims to be exactly for making ‘short and simple’ pieces of music. sequencism calls itself a music sketchbook tool, which is nice idea. According to its creator, the app is designed to provide a traditional user interface of track and piano roll editors, while taking advantage of the touch-screen capabilities of the iPad. It also includes other helper tools, such as chord helper tracks, which is a nice feature.

It’s also worth noting that apparently the main goal of this app is to work as a sketchbook, it is not recommended to use sequencism to produce complex songs or to play songs live on stage. Which is a fair warning I guess.

sequencism features:

• Simple track mixer and visual mixer (volume, pan)
• Multitrack editor: MIDI instrument tracks, chord helper tracks
• Support for SF2* and AUv3 instruments (*lightweight SF2 files only)
• AUv3 Effects
• Piano roll editor: add, move, copy notes within blocks
• MIDI keyboard, supports multiple scales, including user-defined scales
• Support for diatonic and chromatic chords
• Automatic transposing when changing chords or scales
• Supports Audiobus 3 and Ableton Link
• Support for MIDI keyboards, including Bluetooth keyboards
• Export to MIDI

Planned features for the future

• Undo, Redo
• Automation
• Import MIDI files (improve existing support)

———
AUv3 instruments requires iPad Mini 2, iPad 4 or newer.

sequencism is free on the app store:

The post sequencism is a new sketchbook for creating short and simple tracks appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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