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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » mobile


Moog’s Model 15 modular now runs on macOS Big Sur, iPad, iPhone, and M1 Macs

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 20 Jan 2021 12:15 am

One Moog modular runs everywhere (nearly) on the current Apple ecosystem, so your patches go gracefully from Big Sur Mac (M1 or Intel) to iPad to iPhone.

The post Moog’s Model 15 modular now runs on macOS Big Sur, iPad, iPhone, and M1 Macs appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Roland Verselab MV-1 combines drum machine, looper, melody, vocals

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 11 Jan 2021 3:58 pm

Roland's latest outgrowth from their shared hardware platform is a groove machine, song arrangement tool, and looper - one that acknowledges some people want to do both beats and vocals.

The post Roland Verselab MV-1 combines drum machine, looper, melody, vocals appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

OP-Z VJ: app from Teenage Engineering adds video powers

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 21 Dec 2020 6:31 pm

The OP-Z's ultra-minimalist, candybar form factor hides some serious synthesis, sampling, and audiovisual powers - and now new live visual/VJ functions, too.

The post OP-Z VJ: app from Teenage Engineering adds video powers appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Review: Finding inspiration in a compact mixer again, with 1010music Bluebox

Delivered... Andreas Roman | Scene | Wed 9 Dec 2020 7:06 pm

Maybe it's not about being DAW-less or having particular software or gear. Maybe it's just having your hands touch a box from the future that gets you into that state of music play.

The post Review: Finding inspiration in a compact mixer again, with 1010music Bluebox appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Hainbach and Bram Bos made the ultimate tape loop-style field looper for iOS

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 13 Nov 2020 7:35 pm

Hot on the heels of bringing Soviet wire recording to plug-ins, artist and video personality Hainbach has another collaboration - this time, turning your iPhone and iPad into a tape-style field recorder.

The post Hainbach and Bram Bos made the ultimate tape loop-style field looper for iOS appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

How to use Ableton Live 11 and MPE on Sensel Morph, for a delicious, expressive combo

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 10 Nov 2020 6:44 pm

Chicken? Egg? You've got both. Ableton Live adds expression that's actually built for human hands and not just organ keyboards. All you need is hardware and know-how. Sensel have a pitch for both today on Live 11 announcement day - and a guide to a bunch of plug-ins.

The post How to use Ableton Live 11 and MPE on Sensel Morph, for a delicious, expressive combo appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

1010music Bluebox is a little studio hub – mixer, player/recorder, and FX

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Sat 10 Oct 2020 12:39 pm

Bluebox wants to be the compact hub of your studio or rig – it’s a mixer, a multitrack recorder, a player, and it throws in EQ, reverb, and time-synced delay effects for good measure. And it’s blue, obviously. This US$499 cutie is the latest from 1010music, who brought us the clever Blackbox sampler and a […]

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Dreadbox meets Sinevibes, in compact Typhon analog synth + sequencing + fx

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 26 Jun 2020 5:08 pm

Those gnarly Dreadbox analog oscillators and filters keep popping up in new places. This time, it's a collaboration with Sinevibes - and it makes for a compact, jam-friendly, portable synth for 349 EUR.

The post Dreadbox meets Sinevibes, in compact Typhon analog synth + sequencing + fx appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Metagrid 1.5 gives your iPad shortcuts for everything – DAW, notation, Ableton Live

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 14 May 2020 9:34 pm

Sure, theoretically you should memorize a bunch of keyboard shortcuts and painstakingly map macros for tools you use every day. Or you could use Metagrid instead.

The post Metagrid 1.5 gives your iPad shortcuts for everything – DAW, notation, Ableton Live appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Nerdseq portable will put a sampling tracker in your hand

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 18 Mar 2020 10:02 pm

Sampling and modulation and sound generation all come together in the Nerdseq Portable – fully standalone, original tracker hardware for live performance and production.

Yes, there are two standalone tracker devices out this week. They’re both from independent makers. They’re both fully integrated hardware that run on their own. And if you want to go tracker mad, you can even use them together. Both are due later this year – virus-influenced production delays willing.

The Nerdseq Portable has its lineage from the Eurorack module of the same name. But as a handheld, this thing is a bit like a Game Boy on steroids – or a computer crammed into a paperback book-sized powerhouse.

It’s a sequencer. That’s the tracker bit, to be sure – this looks like 90s software on its 480×320 color IPS screen. It does have “nerd” in the title. Think fast editing, as quick as your thumb on a boss in Metroid. And it supports polyrhythms and probability and dividers and multipliers and more.

It’s a sampler. Capture and play polyphonic stereo samples (actually stereo, not mono as on the Polyend), with 150 seconds sample time and pitch support. That can be captured both from your sequence itself but also an external input. So actually – let’s linger on this a moment, in that this is a more powerful sampler than a lot of standalone hardware from major manufacturers not to be named here.

It works with MIDI stuff. You can actually use this as a MIDI sequencer if you want – there’s full-blown polyphonic sequencing and recording per track with support for everything (clock, NRPNs, aftertouch, CC, program changes…) So, again, this is more capable than a lot of more obvious stuff out there.

It does modulation. Part of the whole appeal of trackers is not just sequencing notes and rhythms, but everything else – wavetables, retriggering, LFOs, effects, and more. This thing is deep.

It connects to your Eurorack and other gear. Nerd-Sound-Adapter modules work here, too, so you can still integrate the handheld with a Eurorack modular – like a very powerful satellite to your modular rig – and work with CV/gate.

It has a nerd button. Of course it does.

So how is this different than the modular nerdseq? Well, basically this is as much a more powerful sequel as it is a handheld version of the original nerdseq. You finally lose some of the restrictions of the first model – more buttons, visual feedback, and crucially massively expanded sample memory.

Or to look at it another way, having talked to Thomas, this is the culmination of years of feedback from Nerdseq users. I think it looks friendlier and more capable – and the form factor means it can go anywhere. Or you can squeeze it next to any other gear you want to sequence.

Wait so with this and the Tracker, which should you get? Neither, dummy, they’re not shipping yet.

But these do represent a different approach. The form factor isn’t just aesthetic; it means different use cases and audiences. It’s not that nerdseq is for chip music people – it’s more that you’ll have controls under your thumb and it takes up less space. nerdseq also comes closer to the feeling of tools like LSDJ – or if you’ve never touched those before, again, it’s still about focusing on the tracker itself.

Polyend’s Tracker lacks stereo samples, but expands to more performance and editing features that make it feel like a cross-breed with what you’d expect from Maschine, MPC, or an Elektron box (for example).

Or put the two together. (Yo, dawg, I hear you like trackers, so I — wait, I’m being told by someone under age 35 that I should cease making references to the Xzibit Yo Dawg meme in 2020.)

Due this summer.

Official site: https://xor-electronics.com/nerdseq-portable/ [with more specs – and they’re impressive; this is no toy!]

No videos yet, but – for all of you who whine “I don’t know if I was impressed by the demo video,” I have a solution. You will definitely not be impressed by this video. (Creator Thomas hasn’t been able to go see his video demo person! You know – social distancing. So if you yell at him, really, you’re saying human lives don’t matter.)

Okay, actually I love it, because it keeps with the bossa nova theme that is subtly threaded through this week on CDM.

The post Nerdseq portable will put a sampling tracker in your hand appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Polyend teases Tracker: grid, tracker display, hardware

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 11 Mar 2020 11:20 pm

Polyend has been gradually releasing a set of teasers for Tracker – and today we get the first big picture, looking like a love child of a monome, 90s tracker software, Maschine, and Push.

I mean, just look at this thing:

It looks massively fast for programming elaborate patterns, whether you’re thinking classic genres or wild, new micro-obsessive inventions.

Okay, if you aren’t familiar with the 90s software, that’s not so important. These tools took a different, more non-linear approach to rhythm programming. It’s responsible for some recognizable styles of the time, with elaborate subdivided rhythmic phrases, but it remains appealing irrespective of genre as a different way of thinking about pattern – and, for many, a really fast way of working. It’s also appealing if you simply find that you keep getting stuck in a rut, repeating ideas, when inside the boundaries of a fixed step grid found on a lot of drum machines and simple hardware sequencers and the like.

Maybe the best way to think of this is, it’s a new direction in how to do standalone hardware for music-making away from the computer, on one hand, and the predictability of Roland-style drum and bassline sequencing and Akai MPC sampling on the other.

I mean, if Polyend pull this off, it will certainly appeal to lovers of this approach – but perhaps to newcomers, too.

That’s exactly what happened when different music editing tools found their way onto Nintendo gaming handhelds. People who had never heard of a tracker before, or even in some cases ever tried making music, often picked up these devices because they were self-contained and fun. (See LSDJ on the Game Boy, or, while it’s its own grid-based approach, Nanoloop.)

I’m also impressed that this takes some of the best one-button access to editing functions from Native Instruments’ Maschine and Ableton’s Push. But at first glance, Polyend’s approach looks far simpler and more direct – it’s really elegant seeing that big jog wheel, and a minimal number of buttons. Whereas Push and Maschine are really interfaces to elaborate computer-style software, Tracker promises to be built around its own, standalone workflow. That is, it could be really fast to work with.

A leak suggested this will all be battery-powered, and even come with its own internal FM synth. See Synth Anatomy from earlier this month.

But you won’t have to wait much longer for the full details. Polyend promises to give us a complete run-down when this thing is ready.

So I hope you all keep yourself and loved ones healthy in these challenging times, and that we’re making some great music together later this year. Work on the joy of music continues, and it’s nice work if you can get it. Watch this space.

Past teasers:

(Oh and yeah – I wasn’t playing coy when I said I didn’t know what was coming when the first teaser came out. Polyend really didn’t tell me! I still know what you know, but – when this drops, full official information.)

Polyend

The post Polyend teases Tracker: grid, tracker display, hardware appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Here’s how to update KORG’s wireless nano controller, and use it with iOS 13 (and more)

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 24 Feb 2020 1:43 pm

In case you missed it, in November, KORG fixed issues with their portable Bluetooth MIDI controllers/keyboards and iOS 13. Wireless operation works with desktop OSes, too – and it’s really cool.

Firmware updates I know can be a bit scary, and it’s possible some owners of the KORG wireless devices didn’t even know that there was a fix (or that you can do this, for that matter)! So it’s worth sharing this video KORG posted at the end of last week.

iOS changes have kept developers scrambling lately, but at least this catches you up. And it’s tough to beat the iPad and a wireless nanoKEY as an ultra-portable rig on the road.

Wireless Bluetooth MIDI operation is a strong, low-latency solution on desktop OSes, too, though – useful if you have your computer handy and just need some input device to sketch in ideas or try our your latest virtual modular patch. (That’s me, anyway!)

KORG’s wireless controllers do support both Mac and Windows, too. (I’ll check if there’s a way to get this working on Linux; I suspect someone ported over Apple’s implementation. I also don’t see Android officially supported, but there’s some version there – or you can just use USB and an OTG cable, in a pinch.)

There are a few features that make the nanoKEY Studio easy to recommend, specifically. Everything is ultra-low-profile, so it’s more optimal for tossing in a backpack. There’s still velocity sensitivity on both the pads and keys, and back lighting for dark situations. But I think what’s especially winning is – not just knobs, but also an X/Y pad (KAOSS style), onboard arpeggiator, scale and chord mapping.

KORG push the notion that this helps when you’re not a skilled keyboardist but – obviously, even if you’ve got years of piano training, on a little controller like this you’re in a different mode.

https://www.korg.com/us/products/computergear/nanokey_studio/

Also quite useful on the go, nanoKONTROL Studio:

https://www.korg.com/us/products/computergear/nanokontrol_studio/index.php

In fact, I can imagine nanoKONTROL Studio with the new (wired) Novation Launchpad mini would be ideal. The Launchpad mini has input but not anything that works easily as a mixing layout – other than a somewhat crude mode that uses the pads for that, but doesn’t give you continuous control. Both would fit in a slim-line backpack with literally nothing else, for an easy iPad or notebook computer studio.

Or couple the Launchpad mini and nanoKONTROL Studio, because then you can lock individual controllers to particular instruments without swapping (useful!), or separate clip triggering and instrumental playing.

I just personally love being able to work when traveling and to fit live rigs into small spaces.

The post Here’s how to update KORG’s wireless nano controller, and use it with iOS 13 (and more) appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Samplr, the genius sampling app for iPad, is also getting a long-awaited update

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 4 Feb 2020 7:12 pm

Samplr, one of the best music-making apps on iOS, is getting its first update since 2014.

And how about that timing. If you asked someone to say “what’s the best live sound manipulation tool” for iOS, the two answers you’d like get first would be Borderlands Granular (for granular sounds) and Samplr (for loop manipulation). They’re both deeply intuitive, immediate apps ideal for live performance. But there was a long, bleak period where neither got updates – before this week, Borderlands Granular hadn’t seen an update since March 2015, and Samplr since December 2014.

Apparently Chris and Marcos ate at the same Waffle House and talked about the iOS SDK or something, because now we get a new Samplr release, too.

Samplr is just wonderful – a one-screen interface that lets you capture sounds, then freely loop, slice, and navigate them. It’s not a hardware looper stuck on a touchscreen, either – it’s rather really freshly designed around the touch paradigm.

Here’s me playing live with it in 2017. A kalimba and the internal mic (and my voice) were enough to make a whole set. (I also used the WretchUp app I helped develop with Mouse on Mars.) And that’s really what you hope technology would do for you – give you a chance to just explore your ideas with some freedom, to really improvise.

New in this version:

Ableton Link support. This is probably the best and most awaited feature, because it means easily syncing and jamming with other apps, with other iPads and mobile devices, or with desktop software – not use Live, but tools like Reason or even Pure Data, too. (Oh yeah, wait, SuperCollider? Let’s check. Yes, of course.)

Higher resolution interface – ready for the latest iPads. The whole UI is now redrawn at higher res.

New MIDI sync. Marcos says he’s done a ground-up rewrite of the MIDI sync support, so it now works much more effectively.

Fixed audio recording under iOS 12.

File import improvements. Full updated support for Dropbox and Audioshare, so you can load your own samples from elsewhere.

New, updated, high-res UI.

Marcos says he’s already started work on the next update. No word yet on AUv3 – it’s support for this on both Samplr and Borderlands that will make them more future proof. Heck, both these developers should set up a tip jar; some of us are happy, loyal users.

For everyone else, if you haven’t spent the few bucks on Samplr yet and you own an iPad, go do it. Skip Disney+ or whatever. Samplr is all the entertainment you need.

Still relevant:

The post Samplr, the genius sampling app for iPad, is also getting a long-awaited update appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Arturia KeyStep Pro is the sequencer keyboard we were waiting for

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Jan 2020 8:35 pm

It’s like a BeatStep Pro, but with keys, but with KeyStep features, but with extras. And it’s still compact. Sounds like Arturia may have a hit on their hands.

Remember when we were all repeatedly saying that the KeyStep was cool, but it’d be nice if there were a KeyStep Pro? To their credit, Arturia did keep cramming functionality into their compact keyboard, and that means the latest firmware turned it into a little powerhouse – and one you still might want to consider:

But now the KeyStep Pro expands that. If you loved the BeatStep Pro but wish it had keys instead of pads, or if you loved the KeyStep but wish it had extra encoders and polyphonic features, well… mark your calendars for March the 20th. That’s the date this model launches.

Yep, it sequences all this stuff – MIDI (via minijack or minijack to DIN adapter), USB, analog, with computer or standalone.

And this is still a beat sequencer, so just because it’s a tricked out sequencer keyboard doesn’t mean you need to start making only tripped-out prog rock.

Basically, it’s an ideal performance hub for anyone who likes keyboards. You get loads of compositional flexibility:

  • 4 independent sequencers, which you can route to whatever synths or drum machines or modular or gear you want – just as on the BeatStep Pro
  • 4 tracks have 16 patterns each, and chain 16 patterns into a song
  • Scenes snapshot all the sequences within a pattern, for swapping between sets of patterns
  • Projects let you load up different scenes

And then there’s a nicely balanced complement of physical control.

  • 37 keys with velocity and channel aftertouch
  • LEDs above the keys give you added visual feedback for sequencing
  • Touch strips give you pitch + mod or other assignable controls
  • There’s an internal metronome, which you can listen to (to sync humans) or output as audio (to sync analog hardware)
  • Finally, five encoders with LED ring feedback – that’s an improvement on the BeatStep Pro, at least if you want to swap scenes without having to fiddle with the knobs to get them to pick up the right value
  • And of course step editing buttons, or this wouldn’t be an Arturia ‘step

It’s less portable than the original, but it’s still reasonable – 5.9 lbs or 2.7 kg, and slightly larger. They’re still slim keys, but that also makes this easier to drop into a backpack.

There’s also a crisp new OLED display – nice.

Price is US$449 / EUR 399 list, so it isn’t cheap – the BeatStep Pro is then a nice bargain buy if you like pads as well as you do keys. But for those of us who wanted exactly this as a hub, it looks like a good investment, rather than building a collection of keyboards that kinda sorta do what we want but not really.

More details and full specs:

https://www.arturia.com/products/hybrid-synths/keystep-pro/overview

And the video. Now is a good time to announce CDM’s exciting pivot to video features. Stand on one toe… good… oh, okay, stop groaning at me.

(Heh, I just noticed that Arturia’s own mailing list says this was the sequencer that we’ve “been waiting for.” Well, their product people knew that I was waiting and CDM readers were waiting, as I’d talked to them about it! Review coming soon, hopefully!)

The post Arturia KeyStep Pro is the sequencer keyboard we were waiting for appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Now your smartphone can livestream with proper audio and more, using this new Roland gadget

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 9 Jan 2020 5:26 am

The GO:LIVECAST promises to transform your smartphone from a craptacular lo-fi hassle into an all-in-one multitasking studio.

Webcasting, livestreaming, livecasting, broadcasting, recording, podcasting … let’s drop all the buzzwords and put this into one category. You know the drill: if you’re a one-person show, or you’re on the go, there’s a lot to juggle. And going mobile means doing exactly that – juggling.

The smartphone should be a great solution, until you realize it isn’t. Sound is the main issue, in that it’s a chore to get past the internal mic – even worse if you need to mix, say, voiceover and an instrument. And then the other tasks you have to solve tend to multiply from there.

The funny thing is, these problems now span a big group of people and use cases, blurring together “casual” and pro. Let’s not ever use the word prosumer again – this is really about mobility and autonomy. Smartphones have given us the promise of recording and broadcasting in all places. And people are doing it, regardless. The question now is, will we get tools so that the creation process isn’t frustrating and the results don’t look like crap.

Roland is one of the companies most aggressively vying to fill that use case, and crossing traditional audio production with new consumer uses. (See also: Zoom/Samson.)

GO:LIVECAST does aim to solve a lot of your problems, and it looks like it might pull it off.

Roland’s GO:MIXER is already a solid solution for mobile audio mixing, and if it’s just audio you’re dealing with in your smartphone recording, it might already be enough. But GO:LIVECAST also lets you easily integrate multiple audio feeds with your stream, and has an ambitious list of other functionality:

Add in audio inputs. No more relying on the internal mic on your phone. You get multiple ways of merging your phone’s high-quality imagery with (finally) higher-quality sound:

  • Built-in mic. (Roland claims this captures “high-quality” sound, so we’ll have to compare their hardware with popular phones to find out.)
  • External XLR input so you can use a proper microphone.
  • Stereo line input (for your synth or instrument or an external mixer, etc.)

Plus, there are actual knobs for adjusting levels, not to mention a reverb option for if you want to sing.

Monitor what you’re doing. GO:LIVECAST has the headphone jack that your phone now probably doesn’t, and the ability to monitor the other audio inputs, too.

Trigger titles and media. Radio has long had “soundboards” for triggering audio buttons or sound effects or IDs. This is that for not just sound, but also titles, photos, and videos, since you need this capability for AV generally. It appears the push-buttons on the device integrate with Roland’s app.

There’s some pre-built content (ewww) or you can make your own libraries (oooh).

Multi-camera support, with phones! You can use wifi to add a second camera, not only with the app, but even – didn’t expect this part – with the hardware.

Photo: Roland.

An app to solve all those problems logging in, starting, and monitoring. Anyone who’s tried to do a live stream knows this agony, especially as one person. There’s dealing with logins for streaming services. Then you have people commenting and want to respond. It’s a major pain bouncing between different interfaces.

Roland says they solve all of this with their app. The app logs you into popular services. (That’s YouTube, Facebook Live, and Twitch plus other “major” options – have to find out which.) And it lets you handle the camera and other features alongside checking comments in-app.

There’s in-camera mirroring so you can see yourself, and automatic switching between portrait and landscape modes (another major pain). There’s even a skin filter (took me a second to work out what they mean – I think as in the skin on your face, though some of these features are controversial elsewhere, so we need to see how they implement that.)

I/O: Runs on USB power, connects to Android and iOS devices, stereo minijack line in, XLR and 1/4″ TRS phone input with phantom power.

I’m a little concerned about those buttons and having them locked into Roland’s app. And it’s annoying that Roland is still on microUSB and not USB-C (though they have an adapter cable in the box). But the functionality looks useful, especially if paired with the existing GO:MIXER.

It all looks great – will it deliver? Roland definitely has the right idea. I’m keen to test this to see if it delivers on its promises.

And actually, far from being experienced pros, I think as musicians we’re even more desperately in need of help. Music making doesn’t necessarily prepare you for video production tasks. It makes you more demanding of sound quality, but you also have to deal with, you know, trying to play music and be inspired at the same time, leaving little bandwidth for streaming headaches.

Roland’s GO:MIXER was great, which gives me hope. And the basic features here really do look useful. Plus Roland in general – via their Edirol brand – have been on top of these kinds of production needs at the mid- and high-end, too.

I’m sure there are other streaming tools around CES this week, too. Stay tuned.

Check Roland’s product page, meanwhile:

https://www.roland.com/us/products/golivecast/

The post Now your smartphone can livestream with proper audio and more, using this new Roland gadget appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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