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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Music tech


Did Apple just leak a new version of Logic with Ableton-style clip launching?

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Sun 29 Mar 2020 8:47 pm

Apple appears to have accidentally leaked an upcoming version of Logic Pro with the signature feature of Ableton Live – nonlinear pattern launching.

While spotted on Reddit, the source of this leak at the famously secretive company appears to be … Apple itself. As I write this, the screenshot is still live on a public education site:

https://www.apple.com/education/products/

If this is real – and not a mock-up that accidentally wound up on the page – it represents a landmark. That landmark might best be described as “what took you so long,” arguably, given that Apple Loops have been a feature of Logic Pro and GarageBand back to the reveal of GarageBand in January 2004. (Time flies!)

We can pretty easily analyze the screenshot. At the top, new icons appear to let you view a nonlinear Session View-style layout, the normal track arrangement, or both. (In this screen shot, the two are side-by-side.)

Navigation icons.

As with other copies of Live’s signature Session View, the horizontal and vertical axes are flipped. So whereas Live shows you tracks the way channel strips appear on a hardware mixer, vertically, Apple opt for a view more like a software DAW. Tracks are laid out horizontally, so that they match up with the arrangement.

The grid. Note the circular displays with waveforms – something seen in iPad apps, for instance – though essentially the opposite of Ableton’s embrace of minimalism.
Remix FX – here made to look very Ableton-esque. (These were in GarageBand; I can’t recall exact versions and the relation to Logic… anyone?)

Really, my issue with this is that you wind up with kind of a jumble of interface elements. That’s been the challenge in other DAWs trying to do the same. (An ill-fated effort in Cakewalk nee SONAR springs to mind; MOTU has tried the same in DP, but it’s a bit too soon to know yet how DP users are responding.)

Part of the appeal of Ableton Live is that the entire engine and software operation are structured around the idea, and the UI is clean and compact as a result. Here, part of the reason people may have responded that the image was fake was that it gives the user a lot to digest.

You’ll also see X/Y-pad effects at the bottom, including a filter and repeater – aping something that was in Ableton Live way back at the start.

I’m not sure how users will receive this. It could represent a blow to Ableton in the crucial education market, however, regardless – because it might allow education buyers to standardize on just Logic seats. But it represents a challenge independent software developers face, up against a company the size of Apple, when it comes to value.

On the other hand, I wouldn’t assume anything until there’s official word from Apple. Given this absolutely represents some kind of screw-up, it’s possible the screenshot itself is not representative of something Apple will actually ship.

And I wouldn’t worry too much about Ableton – the company has proven time and again that users are loyal to its workflow and simplicity, whatever the competition. Those of us sometimes swapping between Logic and Live might meanwhile just find this a welcome convenience. Time will tell.

Mainly I’m just sorry for whoever is working at home who may have, erm, just let this out.

The post Did Apple just leak a new version of Logic with Ableton-style clip launching? appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Arturia, Logic, Final Cut, Reaper, and more offer these free tools while you stay at home

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 27 Mar 2020 10:19 pm

Apple Logic Pro, Reaper, and other free and inexpensive tools mean there’s no reason to stare at the walls in self=isolation. Even if your budget is hurting, you can make some music. Here’s an overview.

Plus, bonus – because all these are free for the next 90s days, they’re perfect for collaborating with friends, since you can make sure you’re running the same software. And even if you don’t collaborate in real-time (yeah, I get nervous when people watch me stream messing around with knobs), this is a way for us to feel a little less like we’re on our own.

Play with Pigments, learn tools, get an iPad drum machine app free, thanks to Arturia.

Arturia have a complete stay-home guide: The Pigments software synth is free through July 3, iSpark drum machine is free on the iPad, plus just as importantly, you can catch a whole series devoted to learning tools, improving skills, checking out livestreams and Q&A, and even sharing your work. It looks like it makes loads of sense – Arturia’s folks are also stuck at home, so we all get to interact:

https://www.arturia.com/make-music#en

Even if you use another DAW, Logic might be worth playing with for its wonderful toys – and once you get tired of only live streaming, Final Cut lets you, like, also edit video.

Apple have made a full 90-day license for both Final Cut Pro X and Logic Pro X, so you can get to work editing video and making music. (Hey, you could probably spend 90 days just playing around with the Sculpture and Alchemy synths alone!)

https://www.apple.com/final-cut-pro/trial/

https://www.apple.com/logic-pro/

I recommend you adjust the viewing angle of your monitor. This is seriously not ergonomic. But REAPER is seriously awesome.

REAPER is a great low-cost DAW to begin with and allows free evaluation, but they’ve even created a temporary free license you can use through the 1st of July. Download Reaper if you don’t have it already, then install the license file by copy-pasting text. So they’re even more generous than normally, and their DAW runs on 32-bit and 64-bit macOS and Windows, plus macOS Catalina – just about any machine old or new works. (There’s even an experimental Linux build, or try running in WINE.)

Novation goodies: This actually a normal deal, not pandemic related, but Novation hardware owners can get a free plug-in emulating the rare Sound Master SR-88 analog drum machine, among other goodies. If you missed signing up/registering, and you own some Novation gear, head to – https://novationmusic.com/en/sound-collective

Tracktion Waveform Free is the always-free version of this DAW, which runs on Mac, Windows, Linux (tested on Ubuntu), and even Raspberry Pi . Even the free version has unlimited track count and a simple drum sampler and 4-oscillator subtractive synth. That makes it another ideal choice for collaboration – and you can always bounce down your particular set of plug-ins or output from other software, then use Waveform Free to work on the mix.

Cherry Audio are giving away their starter kit Voltage Nucleus so you can try out modular synthesis for free – with a very capable set of modules already. Get patching and take your mind off the news:

https://cherryaudio.com/free

Also, this is just free. It’s not like, free because of pandemic, it’s just part of the usual free goodies we always get because we’re blessed to be using music software, apparently! But Filterstep looks like a really cool sequenced filter effect for iOS, macOS, and Windows, with a gorgeous interface. Please go use it. I’m afraid to add another filtered effect to my own setup. I rely on you. Thanks to Synthtopia for catching this one.

https://audiomodern.com/shop/plugins/filterstep

Native Instruments came out with their free Analog Dreams instrument, which despite the vaporwave graphic actually covers the full range of analog synth sounds. They’re not new, but while you’re on NI’s site, check out the free Mikro Prism, superb Blocks Base modular synth. and other free stuff.

Analog Dreams

Hainbach has taken his gorgeous aesthetics with tape and analog equipment and made a free sample pack dubbed Isolation Loops. I hear people are already making music with them, so one lovely side effect of this project is people sharing music and not being isolated.

Plus some deals!

Humble Bundle may be best known for gaming and other bundles, but they have a unique Music Producer bundle now. There’s some great Applied Acoustics Software (AAS) starting at just one $USD/EUR. But the really important story here is that they’re supporting Musicians On Call, an organization that sends live and recorded music to people in hospitals. And even if you don’t support this software, I recommend checking out that organization.

Humble Software Bundle: Music Producer

Air Music Tech Ignite is US$9.99 (normally 70 bucks) with a whole bunch of instruments and simple recording facility. There are tons of options here that make this ideal for keyboardists and songwriters, or beginners looking to get some ideas going. And you can use it as a sketchpad for other software – so even if this seems basic for you, it might be a place to start songs before you get lost in more advanced environments like Pro Tools.

Got Ableton Live and ready to finally learn how to use it? Well even with Ableton Loop canceled in Berlin next month, you can get a full 4-week course for free from Berklee on Live Fundamentals. It comes from Erin Barra and Loudon Stearns as instructors, so we’re talking some excellent fundamentals.

Take Your Free Ableton Live Fundamentals Course

Visualists, I’ve got more for you coming shortly.

I’m sure there’s more I’ve missed here; if you’ve got something to share, let us know. I expect we’ll have some great music at the end of all this.

I know you don’t need reminders to stay home and stay safe at this point. So let me remind you instead that your music matters, there’s never too much music, and whether it’s good enough or not is never the question to ask. We all need that reminder now and then. But it’s good to know that even if we’re having some solitary time with music, other people are out there working, too. Look forward to chatting and hearing what you’re making.

The post Arturia, Logic, Final Cut, Reaper, and more offer these free tools while you stay at home appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Add these Max for Live devices for inspiration in Ableton Live – or learn to make your own

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 25 Mar 2020 6:43 pm

A surprising number of Ableton Live users haven’t discovered the power of Max for Live inside. Here’s how to get started – but, oh, you’ve seen it all before? Okay, smarty-pants, learn how to make your own devices, too.

Beginners and those needing some fresh ideas…

Anxious times can be a big barrier to inspiration. And that’s why this guide is useful now. Max for Live add-ons can be particularly useful not just for solving problems, but pushing you in a different direction or getting you back in a state of play. That’s been useful even for me – I was feeling stuck, and wound up finding some new tools that got me going again, just while writing this.

As long as you’ve got a copy of Ableton Live Suite, Max for Live is waiting for you. If not, it’s also a pretty major reason to upgrade.

I’m thrilled to again partner with Riemann Kollection to make a complete guide:

Read up, get started.

Max for Live: the techno producers’ guide

It starts at the beginning; no previous knowledge – what Max for Live is, how to use it, and how to get started with a lot of useful devices in a host of different categories.

Max for Live has an impassioned following, but I suspect a lot of users of Live are afraid to go there. Here’s the thing: you really don’t need to know how to use Max. The fact that Ableton baked in one the most mature and most powerful toolkits for making music production and live visual inventions means you can use the tools everybody else is making.

As it happens, ELPHNT also produced a two-part list of their favorite devices on maxforlive.com. I purposely ignored this list, and still imagined we would overlap. Speaking to the depth of the M4L world, not one device is on both lists. (I even plugged ELPHNT on my list, but it’s not in the Ableton.com story!) Read: [ Part 1 | Part 2 ]

… and those ready to make your own stuff

Okay, maybe you are curious to dig into Max and Max for Live and try customizing devices or creating your own from scratch? And, uh, maybe for some reason you find you have a bit of time on your hands? Well, you’re in luck.

Ableton has an official page with resources. Pay particular note to this line – “Access the Max for Live built-in lessons by clicking on the Help menu–>Help View.” That’s really where you most likely want to begin.

Max for Live tutorials and learning resources [Ableton]

Probably the best comprehensive resource is this Kadenze course from the imimitable expert Matt Wright; it’s a full course equivalent to serious college instruction, and it’s free:

Programming Max: Structuring Interactive Software for Digital Arts

But for a single video intro, try this:

or this –

or this –

More recently, Cycling ’74 also shared best practices in making devices, which would be useful if, uh, you want to share with others. (I mean, for yourself, be as horrible as you like!)

Multichannel audio is what is really useful in the most recent major upgrade:

Finally, because of the current crisis, you can shadow a college course in Max here. I once taught this course for CUNY. I would not be able to do it now – Max has changed radically since I did it, and I have forgotten a bunch – so I’ll be checking it out! There are some sharp tips in there. (and if you know Max a bit, crank up the speed and pretend you’re Data from Star Trek as you go rapid-fire through the parts you know.)

Overwhelmed?

Well, this is about play. So as I said, it’s totally valid to just grab a fun device or two and … try something.

So I still recommend my guide – as a break from dev work, or if you realize your brain is more tired than you thought and you got over-ambitious (never happens to me – I’m lying):

https://riemannkollektion.com/blogs/techno-producer-knowledge-hub/max-for-live-the-techno-producers-guide

See the complete Riemann techno producer knowledge hub for lots of advice.

Images courtesy Ableton.

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Live coders from all over the world are playing music and visuals live online, right now

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 19 Mar 2020 9:37 pm

It’s just business as usual for the live coding scene and algorave movement. From every corner of the globe, freely-coded performance is happening for four days straight – now.

They come from Brasilia. They come from Detroit. They come from Indonesia and Antwerp, Ukraine and Mumbai, Rome and Miami and Japan. They’re running free software and browsers and DIY electronic and visuals. You can dance to what they’re doing. You can’t dance to what they’re doing. This is an experiment.

They’ve all come to Algorave.

youtube.com/eulerroom
twitch.tv/eulerroom
facebook.com/eulerroom

Something rather nice is on as I type this.

Check the full schedule:

http://equinox.eulerroom.com/schedule.html

This is not a new idea, either – TOPLAP live coding community is using this event to celebrate their sixteenth anniversary. So while everyone else is suddenly discovering the fragile nature of our world and the distances between us, these are tools with a significant head start. And the tools are not a gimmick, either – because they’re free and open source and run on low-end hardware, they’re uniquely global and agile.

They’re part of the fabric that makes electronic music now dynamic – and durable.

So algorave on! And hi to some friends playing, see you online soon!

Happy March equinox everyone – spring to the northern hemisphere, fall to the southern. Sonic festivities on the Eulerroom Equinox stretch through 1:30 Greenwich Mean Time 23 March.

(Wait, make that Stardate 97813.31 – 97824.25.)

Want some tools to try live coding now? Many are approachable even if you’re a non-coder – don’t be afraid to try stuff out and break things! Check out:

Gibber – great place to start in-browser

TidalCycles for music

Hydra for visuals in the browser (see our interview with Olivia, the creator)

Side note: I know a lot of these artists and developers will need support soon, in this health and economic crisis. I know a lot of them needed it long before things have gotten tougher. Let’s keep that conversation going here on CDM, too, and find out what solutions we can create together. Don’t hesitate to be in touch and let me or other members of this community know how you’re doing and what you need.

The post Live coders from all over the world are playing music and visuals live online, right now appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

MeeBlip jam festival: watch all the wild and wonderful creations of these synth lovers

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 19 Mar 2020 7:24 pm

The joy of synths – as long as you’ve got a box with knobs on it, you’re never alone. And it’s incredible what people can do with tiny, ultra-affordable gear – including ours.

So, we invited our community of MeeBlippers to share what they’ve been making.

And wow, those MeeBlippers are making some fantastic stuff. The whole reason engineer James and I have stuck with making synth hardware, and trying to make it as accessible as possible, comes down to this – you keep surprising us. It’s a different model of music, inventing something that people can use.

We’re in stock and shipping MeeBlip geode synths, plus cubit go interface and cubit splitter. geode remains the best culmination of all we’ve done, with analog filter, tons of hands-on control, and internal USB MIDI so you don’t need an interface. Delivery times may fluctuate as we deal with COVID-19, but we’re doing our best to keep operating, and we really appreciate your support – it’s what keeps our independent effort going and allows us to make new things even in uncertain times.

Here are a few of our favorites who sent stuff in. I declared MeeB-leap Day a special holiday, but keep them coming! We’ll send some MeeBlip thru5 MIDI kits to a few of you, too! Thanks for all the submissions – and do follow these fine musicians. Here we go:

TriWave: I’m in love with this project, new grimy, groovy techno of Jean-Claude Langensand from Zürich, Switzerland. He tells us he makes them all live with just three pre-programmed MIDI clips, combining MeeBlip with Roland’s TR-8 and SH-01A.

Um this (for two examples):

Joseph Rhodes: “Had a lot of fun tonight using the #meeblip for leads. I played a line in Ableton and had it arpeggiated, then freaked out the knobs. Such a cool box.”

Joseph also made a free sample pack for the OP-1. I actually look forward to loading this on the OP-1 and running the geode alongside for a sort of meta geode*geode jam. Doube double your refreshment! (The sample pack is on Google Drive.)

Mårten Nettelbladt: From Stockholm comes this track with MeeBlip geode drenched in reverb, sounding almost like some long-forgotten classic 70s electroacoustic studio recording. Need to learn more about “Peggy” the MIDI arpeggiator on the right! Check out the Peggy project on Instagram, also from Mårten.

Heat Impact posts some raw, rapid techno combining the geode with Elektron’s Digitone. Love this; it’s a jam, but already sounds like a track. “I am sequencing the Geode from the Digitone, which is a great combo as I can use the scale lock on the sequencer and use the full 64 steps. The Phaser and the Zoom really add something extra to the meatiness and fullness of the Geode, a perfect mono bass synth.” And apparently it was a Christmas gift. Take note! (Birthdays, too, naturally…)

Radio Coriolis: James Taylor writes, “Radio Coriolis volumes 25/26/27 feature heavily MeeBlip. The first synth I found that can equal the Moog Rogue of my accomplice.”

zhorli: More with less – just a Novation Circuit and MeeBlip triode are enough for zhorli to make a full jam session in a tiny amount of space (check his polyrhythm tutorial on the Circuit, too):

Dharma Club: Daniel Hengeveld writes, “I have used the triode and geode in a lot of stuff … but I wanted to share this – the ‘blips are in the rotation for my “liminal techno” project with a friend, Dharma Club, which is live techno-adjacent improvising incorporating samples recorded in the middle of the night when waking up from weird dreams.” Top sampling tip, yes!

Eine Kleine China: Jazzy, avant-garde, spaced-out MeeBlippery on this track combines MeeBlip geode (melody) with a vintage MeeBlip triode (on bass):

daionsavage: Studio jam, spread thick, with MeeBlips geode and anode, plus KORG volca kick and volca drum, and KORG minilogue and monologue, and even Waldorf Streichfett (which literally references covering something in buttery goodness). Heavy stuff, and proof the MeeBlips can cut through anything.

Crypto-oriental techno, indeed!

Ac- Tone: Blast from the past: a vintage orange-and-black MeeBlip SE paired with Eurorack rig, MeeBlip grit against luxurious Euro percussion and chimes:

valleyroadex: MeeBlip anode and triode power everything but drums on this hard-hitting clip:

Bonus round here from our friend Alexey in St. Petersburg, who’s back with a quartet of his own DIY hand-built MeeBlip copies (three of them made the original, open-source generation that started it all):

See you at MeeBlip.com. Keep blipping and for all you’ve given to us.

https://meeblip.com

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Ableton are ready to get you off the grid with the new FlexGroove device

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 19 Mar 2020 4:15 pm

You’ve got tons of devices that let you tweak sounds of synths and effects with knobs. So why not warp time, too?

That’s the idea of FlexGroove, the latest add-on for Ableton Live and Max for Live. Just as you use envelopes and breakpoints to control volume or effects parameters elsewhere in Live, this tool lets you go in and speed up time, slow down time, and transform groove and meter just as easily.

Even as a big believer in words (words rock!), that is something that screams out for a demo. And once you hear this, you’ll get right away why you might want something that does this:

Speeding up (accelerando), slowing down (deccelerando), expressive give and take (rubato), and meter changes are essential building blocks of music in a wide variety of genres and cultures. So on some level, it’s weird that they tend to be hidden in machine music interfaces, in hardware and software – or at least relegated to working on just a master tempo track.

That said, putting them into a dedicated device like this means you can treat these elements in a focused, compositional mindset. And device creator Martin von Frantzius, a composer and musician himself teaching in Germany, has pulled out all the stops.

So you get six timing modes, each with its own presets:

  • Free time (drawn in with breakpoints)
  • Acceleration
  • Deceleration
  • Sine/half sine curves
  • Ratio – (which lets you do metric modulations)
  • Swing

And there’s a built-in pair of step sequencers, plus controls for humanization and velocity, plus probability.

Basically, you fire this up, then spit out clips. Some of the ideas here are really performative, so it’s a shame in a way that it doesn’t focus on playing these things like an instrument. On the other hand, I think for composers, someone adding excitement to a score bed, creating a dynamic break/drop in dance music, and otherwise spawning a ton of more interesting clips – it looks seriously addictive.

And it should also cure you of the dreary feeling of a bunch of on-the-grid monotonous and unmusical clips in your Session View. I just now got the NFR, but this looks worth 39EUR to me.

https://www.ableton.com/en/packs/flexgroove/

Got patches of your own, or favorites from maxforlive.com? Let us know! The more time-warping devices, the merrier, really!

And it’s great to see Ableton continue to use ableton.com as a kind of label for creative Max patchers.

Check out Martin’s page for tons of interesting teaching and engineering and violin and composition projects, like an online church-organ you can play, and — this, for more experimental time-bending with violin:

The post Ableton are ready to get you off the grid with the new FlexGroove device appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Nerdseq portable will put a sampling tracker in your hand

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 18 Mar 2020 10:02 pm

Sampling and modulation and sound generation all come together in the Nerdseq Portable – fully standalone, original tracker hardware for live performance and production.

Yes, there are two standalone tracker devices out this week. They’re both from independent makers. They’re both fully integrated hardware that run on their own. And if you want to go tracker mad, you can even use them together. Both are due later this year – virus-influenced production delays willing.

The Nerdseq Portable has its lineage from the Eurorack module of the same name. But as a handheld, this thing is a bit like a Game Boy on steroids – or a computer crammed into a paperback book-sized powerhouse.

It’s a sequencer. That’s the tracker bit, to be sure – this looks like 90s software on its 480×320 color IPS screen. It does have “nerd” in the title. Think fast editing, as quick as your thumb on a boss in Metroid. And it supports polyrhythms and probability and dividers and multipliers and more.

It’s a sampler. Capture and play polyphonic stereo samples (actually stereo, not mono as on the Polyend), with 150 seconds sample time and pitch support. That can be captured both from your sequence itself but also an external input. So actually – let’s linger on this a moment, in that this is a more powerful sampler than a lot of standalone hardware from major manufacturers not to be named here.

It works with MIDI stuff. You can actually use this as a MIDI sequencer if you want – there’s full-blown polyphonic sequencing and recording per track with support for everything (clock, NRPNs, aftertouch, CC, program changes…) So, again, this is more capable than a lot of more obvious stuff out there.

It does modulation. Part of the whole appeal of trackers is not just sequencing notes and rhythms, but everything else – wavetables, retriggering, LFOs, effects, and more. This thing is deep.

It connects to your Eurorack and other gear. Nerd-Sound-Adapter modules work here, too, so you can still integrate the handheld with a Eurorack modular – like a very powerful satellite to your modular rig – and work with CV/gate.

It has a nerd button. Of course it does.

So how is this different than the modular nerdseq? Well, basically this is as much a more powerful sequel as it is a handheld version of the original nerdseq. You finally lose some of the restrictions of the first model – more buttons, visual feedback, and crucially massively expanded sample memory.

Or to look at it another way, having talked to Thomas, this is the culmination of years of feedback from Nerdseq users. I think it looks friendlier and more capable – and the form factor means it can go anywhere. Or you can squeeze it next to any other gear you want to sequence.

Wait so with this and the Tracker, which should you get? Neither, dummy, they’re not shipping yet.

But these do represent a different approach. The form factor isn’t just aesthetic; it means different use cases and audiences. It’s not that nerdseq is for chip music people – it’s more that you’ll have controls under your thumb and it takes up less space. nerdseq also comes closer to the feeling of tools like LSDJ – or if you’ve never touched those before, again, it’s still about focusing on the tracker itself.

Polyend’s Tracker lacks stereo samples, but expands to more performance and editing features that make it feel like a cross-breed with what you’d expect from Maschine, MPC, or an Elektron box (for example).

Or put the two together. (Yo, dawg, I hear you like trackers, so I — wait, I’m being told by someone under age 35 that I should cease making references to the Xzibit Yo Dawg meme in 2020.)

Due this summer.

Official site: https://xor-electronics.com/nerdseq-portable/ [with more specs – and they’re impressive; this is no toy!]

No videos yet, but – for all of you who whine “I don’t know if I was impressed by the demo video,” I have a solution. You will definitely not be impressed by this video. (Creator Thomas hasn’t been able to go see his video demo person! You know – social distancing. So if you yell at him, really, you’re saying human lives don’t matter.)

Okay, actually I love it, because it keeps with the bossa nova theme that is subtly threaded through this week on CDM.

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Free sound and music code environment SuperCollider is adding Ableton Link support

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 17 Mar 2020 6:00 pm

The free, powerful tool SuperCollider is adding support for Ableton Link for getting jam sessions, gear, and software on the same groove, alongside other fixes.

SuperCollider, if you don’t know it already, is a massive tool for making your own synths, effects, and musical tools. It’s all created using an elegant language, tons of customization options, and a massive library of building blocks for just about the entire history of sound generation and processing and musical patterns. It takes some time to learn and master, but with a huge community and tons of examples, it can teach you the basics of synthesis and effects in the process.

3.11 is currently in beta. Ableton Link support is the headline here, but 3.11 is full of fixes and additions. A lot of that is thanks to contributions from the community – showing a really active, thriving open source project.

So if you’ve been waiting to play around with SuperCollider for the first time, or revisit it, you may have picked a good time. (Just think about 3.10.3 if you’re not a beta tester sort of person; it’s been really stable for me.)

Ableton Link support means you can easily sync up time with other software (across mobile and desktop) and a handful of hardware, too. And I expect this will make waves in the live coding world, too – because even apart from people using SuperCollider directly in live coding performances, it’s also the basis of popular environments like Tidal Cycles. (See my write-up of version 1.0.)

Check out the beta notes if you’re ready to give this a try – and yeah, it’s another great choice while we’re isolated right now:

https://github.com/supercollider/supercollider/releases/tag/3.11-beta1

LinkClock is the class; I need to check it out myself. Stand by.

Your source for all SuperCollider stuff – and it’s full of great tutorials, too:

https://supercollider.github.io/

Completely free, Mac, Windows, Linux, Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone, whatever.

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Bored? Broke? Get Minimoog Model D on iOS, KORG KAOSSilator on iOS + Android for free

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 17 Mar 2020 11:14 am

Get some synth therapy for free from Moog and KORG on mobile. And do send us your music. Deals this week only.

KORG’s KAOSSilator and Moog’s Minimoog Model D are some of the most accessible, fun soundmakers on mobile – and they integrate well with other stuff – so you definitely owe it to yourself to pick these up while they’re free.

iOS users can grab both the Minimoog and iKAOSSilator. Android users get their own version of KAOSSilator which – literally I just started using on my Huawei handset as I write this. You’ll notice, because suddenly I’ll get distracted, and instead of writing words I whwwooooooooseeeeeeee whooopppp wadaddle weeeerrrrrrwwwww wherw wherw wherw wherwwww wherwww whoosh ! — uh, sorry. Okay, I see why some people communicate about synths on YouTube.

These are some steep discounts – the Android edition of KAOSSilator alone is normally US$17.99. (That’s why I didn’t buy it, since I own it on iOS already. But now – synth noises on my Android phone, too!)

Just please remember to disinfect your phone regularly with alcohol wipes or applying a bit of sanitizer to a lint-free cloth or paper.

KAOSSilator

KAOSSilator is a simple X/Y synth. Pick a sound, map a scale/tuning, make gestures with your finger, and record them with a phrase recorder.

It’s simple stuff, but that to me is the whole reason to grab it. And it’s one of the few apps that runs on both iOS and Android.

There is a weird phenomenon with free apps; they seem to garner more negative criticism than positive ones. My theory is, people who buy something are a self-selecting group. Some people seem to feel motivated to troll everyone, and free apps allow them to do that. So I do see a negative review on the Google Play Store. Let me disagree:

KAOSSilator, especially with its bass sounds, is genius for creating spontaneous little phrases you could use later to start a song. The constraints are a feature, not a bug.

I’m inclined to use it for sketching little phrases for later, but it also looks handy for jamming – and many people use it for that.

That said, KORG, I’m sure we would love to see a real KAOSS effect on mobile, too, if you’re up for it – especially routed into larger setups.

Also, major kudos on Android – this app is responsive and fun on my Android smartphone, which can be said of only a handful of apps. But between this and the stuff from warmplace.ru, plus the ability to actually navigate folders of media rather than fight with the iTunes prison, makes me a very happy Android smartphone owner.

Even on iOS with more choices, iKAOSSilator is a fantastic choice for your iPhone – handheld fun.

KORG iKAOSSilator on the App Store [iOS]

KORG KAOSSilator for Android [Google Play Store]

Minimoog Model D for iOS

The Minimoog Model D is simply a must-own. It’s one of the most beautifully crafted apps on iOS – and impressively competes with other hardware and software as one of the best ways to add a Minimoog to your rig, hands down. It does things the real thing can’t, like 4-note polyphony – and it adds an arpeggiator, loop recorder with overdub, stereo ping-pong delay with sync, and stereo modulation effect. But the core of it sounds and looks authentic.

And it supports everything. iOS developers should have a copy just as a reference.

• All 64-bit iOS devices
• AUv3 Audio Unit Extensions (Including GarageBand)
• Note-per-channel MIDI controllers (MPE)
• Ableton Link
• Inter-App Audio and Audiobus
• 7 and 14-Bit MIDI
• MIDI Program Changes
• Bluetooth LE MIDI controllers
• Share over AirDrop, Mail or other iOS applications

It also runs on both iPhone and iPad, though it really feels best as an iPad app.

Go deeper with modulation if you choose:

And yeah, someone compared it to the real thing:

Moog Music Minimoog Model D on the App Store

Also, it’s now cheaper to buy even a decent iPad and this app for less than the price of a certain hardware clone. If you’ve got the iPad already, it’s free. (And a lot of iPads support it; see the notes in the link above – so long as you’re on iOS 10.3 or later.)

Of course, given the likely duration of this quarantine period, what you really want is probably the Model 15 modular.

https://www.moogmusic.com/products/model-15-modular-synthesizer-app

Have fun, make some noises, send us some tunes!

The post Bored? Broke? Get Minimoog Model D on iOS, KORG KAOSSilator on iOS + Android for free appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Polyend teases Tracker: grid, tracker display, hardware

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 11 Mar 2020 11:20 pm

Polyend has been gradually releasing a set of teasers for Tracker – and today we get the first big picture, looking like a love child of a monome, 90s tracker software, Maschine, and Push.

I mean, just look at this thing:

It looks massively fast for programming elaborate patterns, whether you’re thinking classic genres or wild, new micro-obsessive inventions.

Okay, if you aren’t familiar with the 90s software, that’s not so important. These tools took a different, more non-linear approach to rhythm programming. It’s responsible for some recognizable styles of the time, with elaborate subdivided rhythmic phrases, but it remains appealing irrespective of genre as a different way of thinking about pattern – and, for many, a really fast way of working. It’s also appealing if you simply find that you keep getting stuck in a rut, repeating ideas, when inside the boundaries of a fixed step grid found on a lot of drum machines and simple hardware sequencers and the like.

Maybe the best way to think of this is, it’s a new direction in how to do standalone hardware for music-making away from the computer, on one hand, and the predictability of Roland-style drum and bassline sequencing and Akai MPC sampling on the other.

I mean, if Polyend pull this off, it will certainly appeal to lovers of this approach – but perhaps to newcomers, too.

That’s exactly what happened when different music editing tools found their way onto Nintendo gaming handhelds. People who had never heard of a tracker before, or even in some cases ever tried making music, often picked up these devices because they were self-contained and fun. (See LSDJ on the Game Boy, or, while it’s its own grid-based approach, Nanoloop.)

I’m also impressed that this takes some of the best one-button access to editing functions from Native Instruments’ Maschine and Ableton’s Push. But at first glance, Polyend’s approach looks far simpler and more direct – it’s really elegant seeing that big jog wheel, and a minimal number of buttons. Whereas Push and Maschine are really interfaces to elaborate computer-style software, Tracker promises to be built around its own, standalone workflow. That is, it could be really fast to work with.

A leak suggested this will all be battery-powered, and even come with its own internal FM synth. See Synth Anatomy from earlier this month.

But you won’t have to wait much longer for the full details. Polyend promises to give us a complete run-down when this thing is ready.

So I hope you all keep yourself and loved ones healthy in these challenging times, and that we’re making some great music together later this year. Work on the joy of music continues, and it’s nice work if you can get it. Watch this space.

Past teasers:

(Oh and yeah – I wasn’t playing coy when I said I didn’t know what was coming when the first teaser came out. Polyend really didn’t tell me! I still know what you know, but – when this drops, full official information.)

Polyend

The post Polyend teases Tracker: grid, tracker display, hardware appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

All about Mutable’s Marbles random sampler – and a clever, just-released update

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Sat 7 Mar 2020 12:04 am

Mutable Instruments’ modules seemed poised to live forever, in synth terms. A clever update this week is a good reminder of the coolness of the Marbles random sampler.

Okay, first – what’s Marbles? Well, the name should evoke dropping a cluster of marbles on a hardwood floor from waist height and listening to the cascade of tapping sounds.

And the hardware itself delivers something like that poetic image. The Marbles Eurorack module is a source of random gates (for rhythmic events), and clocked random voltages (for other patterns and random changes). The twist is – apart from copious controls and ins and outs – Marbles is also a random sampler. So you can reuse bits of material, for randomness that repeats a little, or a lot (depending on where you set the knob).

Here is exactly where this week’s update comes in – it “super locks” a chosen section with a long press, letting you subtly play with variation. It’s a small feature, but it expands the musicality of this module as an instrument. From creator pichenettes:

How does it work? A long press on the t or X DEJA VU buttons locks the random generation for this section – which will stop responding to the DEJA VU knob. When a section is in this “super locked” state, the illuminated push-button blinks rapidly. Press it to bring it back to normal.

What is the point? Allow subtle variations or permutations in the melody (by playing with the DEJA VU knob) while the rhythm remains constant… or vice-versa!

More on the details, with download, and discussion, on the Mutable forum:

Marbles “super lock” feature

There are detailed release notes for this revision, 1.2, plus the 1.1 version which added accessibility for people with red/green color blindness, and bug fixes.

https://mutable-instruments.net/modules/marbles/firmware/

This is a singular update for the maker in some time, as Mutable Instruments founder/developer Émilie Gillet moves on to some other career areas and leaves this project in “low power” mode. Full support for her in doing that – speaking as someone who has clung to projects, I can also appreciate why there are moments when you might want to let go and do something different. (Despite what you may have read elsewhere, there’s no indication that more is in store after this – but I think this is still a newsworthy and creative update.)

Speaking of open-source hardware, though, Mutable’s contribution to the scene has been both in producing some of the most compelling Eurorack modules and desktop synths of recent years, and in influencing others through open-source licenses. So for instance, on VCV Rack you can try a third-party recreation in software of the Mutable modules as “Audible Instruments” (since Emilie didn’t produce them, the name is changed). Marbles is just called “Random Sampler” there. I’ll be curious to see if this feature gets added.

I’m learning the module and what it can do there, and if I ever get around to making a small skiff, this is one of the modules I expect to drop into it. (Big advantage of VCV Rack, of course, is that you can try before you buy – and then invest carefully in hardware you really know how to play.)

Check the one and only original module:

https://mutable-instruments.net/modules/marbles/

Ready to learn how to use this? Let’s go:

And for you fellow Rack users:

Our friends over at Schneidersladen did a workshop on the full Mutable range back in 2018:

And yep, for proof that Marbles is open-source hardware, see here:

https://github.com/pichenettes/eurorack/tree/master/marbles

Seems only fitting to mention Emilie in this screwball week we’ve had here, as Mutable Instruments and our conversations about open source technology and change have also been part of the ride CDM and MeeBlip have had to get to where we’re at. And in the end, we’re all mutable instruments.

The post All about Mutable’s Marbles random sampler – and a clever, just-released update appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

In Russia, vintage MeeBlips have custom clones, thanks to open source hardware

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 6 Mar 2020 12:42 am

The original version of our MeeBlip synth project has found a quirky new iteration in St. Petersburg – and it’s making some terrific grooves.

Let’s start with this fantastic, primal alien-discotheque vibe of MeeBlip Quartet, featuring three MeeBlips SE and one MeeBlip triode (“Rare Russian Edition”), via two splitter boxes.

Perfect for setting the mood on your space station, really.

Open-source hardware in music can have a life past its normal conclusion. Our original MeeBlip synthesizer is now coming up on its ten-year anniversary. And because part of what we’ve improved is the ease of manufacturing our newest hardware, we don’t intend to go back to the original and “SE” model. The new stuff is better. But anyone curious about its circuitry and firmware – or digital filter code in Assembly language for the AVR microprocessor – can find all of that on our GitHub:

https://github.com/MeeBlip

James Grahame did nearly all of the engineering, but you’ll also find copious credits to other contributions. So you’ll see people like Jarek Ziembicki, who made the open-source AVRsynth that inspired us, or optimizations and new waveforms by Axel Werner, one of our early customers.

This also means people can make new MeeBlips of their own – for people who want those oddball earlier iterations, or in countries where it’s more accessible and affordable sourcing local parts than trying to import a complete synth from overseas.

And that’s what Alexey Evlampiev of St. Petersburg, Russia has been up to. He’s been making cool “Russian edition” versions of the original MeeBlip SE and triode, plus the superb open-source FM synth preenfm2, among other gear fascinations. (Speaking of preenfm2 – that project by Xavier Hosxe has built on musicdsp.org, which is an excellent clearinghouse for algorithms from synths to FX to filters, as well as pioneering work by Mutable Instruments, who has made perhaps the broadest variety of open-source synth hardware contributions.)

Here’s a duo of MeeBlips triode (Russian) and Elektron machinedrum (normal Swedish edition, that):

Also digging the retro-green panel on this anode:

Please do ask before you use the MeeBlip name, though – it avoids confusion about who made the synth. We’ve talked to Alexey in this case, and like his custom artwork, so – approved.

Since the Russian Editions are super-limited, we still suggest our official MeeBlip shop if you want to get your synth on, and the latest MeeBlip geode. (We also make low-cost thru boxes aka MIDI splitters, including the thru5 kit if you want to make one yourself.)

https://meeblip.com

It’s funny hearing our older synths, as the geode has definitely improved in sonic features – and we made it easier to build and ship. It’s in stock now:

But I have loved seeing the crazy custom builds people have made over the years by modding our finished synths, using our free and open-source (GPL-/CreativeCommons-licensed) designs, or working with our kits. It might just give James and me some new ideas for panels and knobs and colors and whatnot – suggestions also welcome.

Open source hardware isn’t the right choice for every project – our current synth uses a proprietary USB interface for reliability, for instance. But it’s nice to have it be part of the music gear ecosystem when it makes sense. It also shows that we can make inexpensive gear and exchange information while giving proper credit – real sharing, rather than simply plagiarism.

And I do hope to meet Alexey for a jam session next time I’m in St. Petersburg. Plus I’ve got to get James Grahame over to Russia and Berlin, as I’m sure he’ll love it.

Russian speakers can follow Alexey at his VKontakte site – https://vk.com/grooveboxmusic; everyone else, subscribe on YouTube.

See you at meeblip.com.

The post In Russia, vintage MeeBlips have custom clones, thanks to open source hardware appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

German music tech events encounter COVID-19; Musikmesse postponed

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 4 Mar 2020 10:54 pm

Novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, meet the musical instruments and music tech business. Events in Germany are threatened, and more could be in store worldwide.

It’s too tempting to use the virus image instead of Messe, since, well, while they’re deadly, viruses look amazing – thanks, science and nature, mostly.

This isn’t really about spreading fear about the disease itself. It makes sense to keep connected with health authorities and heed their advice to reduce our own exposure and help prevent infecting others.

But the other power of epidemics is to disrupt other activities – not just by making us sick, but by making us adapt as the world around us changes.

In Germany, documented cases are growing, and travel is being curtailed. It’s possible that simply the economics of trade fairs can break down – if there aren’t enough flights, or workers supporting the airport system, the travel infrastructure itself starts to devolve.

For now, Messe finds themselves in the part of Germany with more cases, and therefore more restrictions. And on top of it, not all exhibitors will be able to travel. In a press release from today:

The ongoing spread of Covid-19 in Europe called for a reassessment of the situation in close cooperation with the public-health authorities in Frankfurt who require that steps be taken to prevent event participants from high-risk regions coming to Frankfurt and visiting the fair when ill. Given that these participants could also be infected by Covid-19, it is necessary to conduct a health check to prevent the infection spreading even further. This is an important part of the infectiological risk assessment. Messe Frankfurt is not able to implement such measures. Additional factors behind the decision include the growing number of travel restrictions, which will make it difficult for many potential visitors and exhibitors to get to Frankfurt.

This should also make it clear why it’s not just “panic” closing events – at least, not in areas with greater infection. These sort of precautions at large scale events help prevent those gatherings from turning into hubs for spreading disease.

At least in the case of Messe, these are science-based precautions, made in consultation with people who study infectious disease.

Musikmesse runs 1-4 April. The organizers say they’re looking for other dates and tickets will remain valid.

Photo: Pietro Sutera, Musikmesse.

For now, part of the event remains on schedule – a local marketplace of instruments and gear and a festival of events across Frankfurt:

The ‘Musikmesse Plaza’ pop-up market (3 and 4 April) and the ‘Musikmesse Festival’ (31 March to 4 April 2020) can take place as planned. These events are aimed primarily at a regional audience from the greater Frankfurt area.

See: www.messefrankfurt.com

Musikmesse is one of three major music instrument/tech manufacturing events in April, all of them in Germany. Superbooth and Ableton’s Loop could also be impacted.

For now, both Ableton and Superbooth say they’re pressing on. Berlin currently has more limited cases than the western part of Germany, which might help, though travel restrictions elsewhere or the continued expansion of the disease in Germany could change that.

Synthtopia has some coverage of the news this week:

Ableton Loop Going Ahead As Planned

Coronavirus Not Stopping Superbooth 2020, Say Organizers

Superbooth’s statement:

With SUPERBOOTH20 starting in about 8 weeks from now, we prefer to rely on facts rather than speculations about the future. Please check Robert Koch Institute in Berlin for further information (German/English).

Without any carelessness about health or risks, we basically are very careful with the daily news spreading and panic producing sensational reports. We are observing the development, but can not say how the situation will change in the coming weeks. If we have the impression that we should act in any way, we will do so. By now we can only say, the situation in Berlin is safe and we do not want to be part of any speculations.

As long as there is no official ban by the authorities, we have decided to keep on working on the finalization of this year’s Superbooth.

Musikmesse is not alone. Leipzig Book Fair, ITB Berlin (a tourist fair), Berlin Tourism Festival, and the Hannover Messe tech fair have all postponed.

The good news for Germany is elsewhere; despite some closures, Germany for now is not resorting to quarantines or shutting its borders, at least for now. Trade fairs are an especially difficult case because of their complexity and dependence by nature on lots of travel.

The larger impact in music tech may come from the supply chain. Whether they’re Chinese-made or not, the vast majority of music hardware is dependent on China for a lot of their components. And manufacturing in China is off – way, way off. As the country has struggled to find workers and move goods, its capacity is dramatically reduced. (See the BBC on their just-released manufacturing numbers.)

It might sound callous to talk about economics when a potentially deadly virus is around, but the reality is, both could impact lives. Jobs in Asia and internationally in music gear face some new challenges. An overstressed health care system can put both lives and livelihoods at risk, too. That hits especially hard for people lacking access to good health care or absent health insurance and job security.

And artists face hardships, too, as travel is diminished, economies weaken, and large-scale events like festivals and clubs cancel.

Of course, the one place we can go is online. I have real belief in the resiliency of the music, immersive visual, and musical instrument communities and industries. I wish everyone strong health and easy travel and – even if we’re stuck in one place, hope we keep talking about ideas so we keep exchanging music and supporting ourselves. Watch this space. (I, uh, just hope I’m not quarantined or down with a virus with extra time as a result!)

Image:

NIAID Rocky Mountain Laboratories (RML), U.S. NIH – https://www.niaid.nih.gov/news-events/novel-coronavirus-sarscov2-images

This scanning electron microscope image shows SARS-CoV-2 (yellow)—also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus that causes COVID-19—isolated from a patient in the U.S., emerging from the surface of cells (blue/pink) cultured in the lab.

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Here are ten hours of infinite fractals and falling Shepard’s Tones

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 3 Mar 2020 5:52 pm

Yesterday was one of the stranger 24 hours in the 15+ year history of producing this site, as you may have heard. So here is a palette cleanser, then, in case you have a … wine hangover.

Please be careful if you’re prone to epilepsy.

Oh, and welcome, new CDM readers! If you’re confused and wonder if it’s always like this here, I am confused, too, and … yes. It pretty much is. There’s a mailing list, if you want this to continue.

If ten hours isn’t enough of this sound for some reason, there’s also an online generator with binaural output so you can really trip out (wear headphones).

There are some terrific background notes already on the video, which can lead you into a nice research audiovisual linkhole to match your synesthesia trip:

Video: Used with permission from the animated fractal’s creator, Vladimir Bulatov. Check out his YouTube page here: http://bit.ly/13jdZ7e , and his DeviantArt page here: http://bit.ly/Yx2S78 .

The video is a fractal version of M.C. Escher’s “Circle Limit III” (http://bit.ly/bbJ9P) created by Bulatov.

Audio: Shepard’s Tone (Shepard’s Scale) consisting of rising tones set octaves apart, similar to how to barber’s pole always seems to be rising: http://bit.ly/tlSj Interestingly, the Batman’s BatPod in “The Dark Knight” uses a Shepard Tone effect to make the motorcycle to seem to have an infinitely rising tone: http://bit.ly/Wfa8WS In classical music, the Shepard’s Scale is used in pieces like Bach’s “Canon Per Tonos” (endlessly rising canon), to have the piece seem to end an octave higher than it began while ending on the same note: http://bit.ly/YTWtzC Many have said that they experience a falling sensation or a feeling of imbalance when they watch this combination for a long time. It was reported by Reddit user “Berkel” that by playing The Shepard tone near a sleeping friend, the friend had a visceral falling dream and woke up very scared. http://bit.ly/XVwfi8 .

We would not recommend trying this! We take no responsibility for visceral dreams, dizziness, fatigue, sweaty palms, seizures, lack of friends, or any other side effects from watching this video.

And yeah, that’s a Shepard Tone, not to be confused with a Shepherd’s Tone, which is presumably what happens when you attempt to tend to your sheep while also catching up on your anthology of French experimental electronic music.

Here’s some more reading on that:

If you want to really be a snob CDM style, despite what you may have heard from our ‘haters’, clearly you need to nitpick the difference between a Shepard Tone and a Shepard-Risset glissando. (Hey, where’d everyone go?! Fine. More wine for me.)

But these kinds of risers and sounds are actually easy to produce – even for free – and can be used in a wide variety of contexts to produce extra suspense and a feeling of constant falling or rising.

Here you go!

It works really well in the free software SuperCollider, which you can run on almost any computer and any OS – no massive CEO-style budget required:

And there are lots of other ways to go about this, too – including some tutorials new to me (and you can even sample sound sources):

And yeah, it’s in sound design, too:

Risset rhythms are even crazier. I’m still waiting for someone to invent a new music genre based on this. (Chicago, I’d ask you, though by now you really have given us enough.)

If you do create a new Risset rhythm-based musical style, let us know about it. My shoes are laced up and ready to dance to it.

The post Here are ten hours of infinite fractals and falling Shepard’s Tones appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Celebrate MeeB-leap Day weekend with these great synth vids – or make your own

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 28 Feb 2020 11:34 pm

One extra day in the calendar is clearly a reason to spend one extra day playing with synths and making and sharing music. So we’ve decided to get MeeBlip in on that.

We’ve got synths and accessories in stock in our MeeBlip store now. But we also wanted to reach out to all of you who have one of the instruments we’ve made and hear (and see, if you want) what you’re making.

Part of why I know this will be fun is because I’m always surprised by videos like this one by YouTuber lifeisfortytwo – whoever you are. This is honestly to me the whole pleasure of making independent instruments and independent music, making connections to people.

(Oh, if you’re in this post, you can still message us, by the way!)

We’ll give out some thru5 MIDI splitter kits to reward our favorites, and hopefully give some extra fame to as many as we can.

Here’s how our MeeB-leap Day celebration works:

1. Find a jam or live set or track or whatever you made with your MeeBlip – or record a new one.

2. Upload audio only if you prefer (somewhere like SoundCloud), or video if you’re showing off your synth-tweaking fingers or other graphics (somewhere like YouTube or Facebook).

Send the link to us. Just put “B-Leap Day” in the subject header, and we’ll have a look. Send to:

meeblip@reflexaudio.com

We’ll point people to your Facebook page or YouTube or SoundCloud or Instagram channels so you can get some extra followers! (Well, unless you really prefer we put them on ours, in which case just say so!) If you recorded some stuff in “Jam-uary,” that counts, too! And we’ll be in touch if we can throw you a thru5 kit.

For more MeeBlip action, here’s the excellent Sensel Morph as a command center for our geode alongside out friends KORG volca beats and Roland SH-01A:

There’s even this clever video showing our MeeBlip cubit go MIDI interface as a smart accessory for the Teenage Engineering OP-Z! (I actually just found this by typing in a search. Thanks!)

And for added inspiration, one more flashback to that time and went and visited Sir HAINBACH:

You can also reach us by messaging our MeeBlip social accounts:

https://www.facebook.com/meeblip/

Or come visit the site:

https://meeblip.com/

See you on the Internet.

The post Celebrate MeeB-leap Day weekend with these great synth vids – or make your own appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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