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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Music


Techno lovers, don’t miss James Ruskin’s new EP and updated Blueprint catalog

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 19 Jul 2019 3:17 pm

It’s the Detroit-Croydon connection. But for innovative electronic dance sounds, you really don’t want to miss James Ruskin – either his new EP or the refreshed Bandcamp page for Blueprint Records.

First, out today, you get a new James Ruskin EP – and it’s brilliant, worth the five year wait from the last one. This time, we’ll get a second solo Ruskin by the fall, plus something new on 12″ from the always-excellent Truncate, all on Ruskin’s stalwart Blueprint Records (founded back in the storied 1990s with (Richard) Poison.

I mean, blah blah, techno is dead, nothing new is happening, I can’t hear you over this track, just for example –

Yes, techno is perhaps overly driven by influencers and Instagram accounts, except I can’t really think of anything intelligent to say other than “go hear it.” Maybe I should work out my wardrobe and just tell you that from Instagram and adapt to the times.

You can have it today on vinyl – still in stock at Decks for a slim 9 bucks:

https://www.decks.de/track/james_ruskin-reality_broadcast_off/cf2-g0

But don’t stop there, as it appears the full Blueprint Bandcamp page has gotten a refresh, chock full of re-released back catalog. Also this week is this lovely collab with Mark Broom:

And then Blueprint just goes on and on from there, from Samuel Kerridge and Surgeon, whose St. Petersburg sets last weekend are part of the reason CDM news has been a bit slow on the road this week, to Lakker and O/V/R. Have at it then. It’s summer (for one hemisphere), and music is still endless joy (for everyone, I hope).

https://blueprintrecords.bandcamp.com/

James Ruskin will release his first solo EP in five years later this month.

Reality Broadcast Off, the influential UK techno artist’s first solo EP since 2014’s Nan Nife, has three tracks that find Ruskin in the sort of deep techno mode of Ostgut Ton peers like Marcel Dettmann, who played “Disaffection” on a recent mix for BBC Radio 1. The EP will come out on Ruskin’s long-running label, Blueprint Records, on July 19th.

Blueprint also has two more releases in the works. A second solo Ruskin EP is scheduled for this autumn, followed by a new Truncate 12-inch. More details will follow soon.

The post Techno lovers, don’t miss James Ruskin’s new EP and updated Blueprint catalog appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Pale, male and stale: does modern classical have a gender problem?

Delivered... Lanre Bakare | Scene | Thu 18 Jul 2019 7:00 am

Compilation album by Wayne McGregor criticised for only including two works by women

Modern classical and electronic music is still dominated by stars who are largely “pale, male and stale”, leading industry figures have warned, after learning of a major new compilation album featuring only two works composed by women.

Collaborations, which will be released by Mercury KX – a label that claims to cross “the borders between electronic, ambient, classical, alternative and modern music” – is compiled by choreographer Wayne McGregor and was billed as “a collection of music from the biggest names in modern classical and electronic music” in a tweet sent by the label. But the dearth of female artists was immediately picked up on – with footwork artist Jlin and Finnish contemporary composer Kaija Saariaho the only women represented over the 15 tracks.

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Lisbon Beat review – energetic musical odyssey to the city’s edge

Delivered... Peter Bradshaw | Scene | Wed 17 Jul 2019 12:00 pm

This brief but engaging documentary celebrates Lisbon’s vibrant African-Portuguese music scene

There is a short, sharp blast of energy in this brief music documentary by DJ Rita Maia and cinematographer Vasco Viana about the African-Portuguese music scene in Lisbon’s outer suburbs, the “corrugated villages” that appeared after the 1970s. It is not quite right to call this ghetto culture; the milieu is more nuanced and complicated than that in terms of nationality, race, generation and class, although it is certainly pretty male.

The music is an engaging mix of digital and analogue, new and old. A lot of it comes from DJs with Mac Book Pros and music-editing software and who play marathon-length parties. A lot more comes from traditional instruments such as a Ferro player, a percussive instrument lying over the shoulder like a length of steel that produces a weirdly hypnotic thrumming noise, and a kora, a 22-string instrument from west Africa that has been in use for hundreds of years.

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Banks: III review – a break from dark R&B doesn’t quite pay off

Delivered... Aimee Cliff | Scene | Fri 12 Jul 2019 10:00 am

(Harvest Records)
Her third album is a less-than-convincing attempt to lighten the old experimentalism in favour of chart-friendly ballads

LA singer Banks was heralded as part of a wave of “alternative R&B” when she emerged in 2014. Her distorted vocals and experimental beats were categorised alongside Tinashe and FKA twigs – though the latter refuted the label, saying that her music was “punk”, and only tangentially related to R&B. Twigs was right, and with the benefit of hindsight, Banks’s murky trap-pop offerings sound little like the other artists she was grouped together with when she released her debut album, Goddess. After another album and a two-year break, Banks is back with III, an LP that kicks against this pigeonhole with streaming-friendly electronic soul ballads and post-Kanye West maximalist pop (colourful Glaswegian producer Hudson Mohawke had a large hand in the record).

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Mother Earth’s Plantasia: the cult album you should play to your plants

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Tue 9 Jul 2019 3:00 pm

It was made by an easy-listening songwriter and given away free with mattresses. Now thanks to YouTube’s algorithm, Mort Garson’s Plantasia has become an underground hit

In the early noughties, Caleb Braaten was working in a secondhand record shop in Denver, Colorado, when he came across an album that looked intriguing. The cover of Mother Earth’s Plantasia featured a cartoon of two people cuddling a houseplant, and came with a free horticultural booklet. Best of all, it claimed that its intended audience wasn’t human: you were supposed to play its “warm Earth music” to plants “to aid in their growing”.

“So I put it on and, man, I absolutely immediately fell in love with it,” says Braaten, who now runs Sacred Bones Records. “There’s something about it that is immediately nostalgic. It takes you to this warm place in the past. It’s tickling those same senses as something from your childhood. I think people who didn’t even grow up with that stuff also feel that same warm sensation of … I don’t know. It’s very interesting.”

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New Music Biennial review – from the novel to the

Delivered... Philip Clark | Scene | Sun 7 Jul 2019 4:16 pm

Southbank Centre, London
From a turntable artist’s orchestral remix to Gazelle Twin’s melodic revelry, composers reimagine classical

However deeply electronic composers and turntablists journey inside their own world of sound, the invitation to map their primary musical concerns on to a symphony orchestra usually proves impossible to resist. At the Southbank Centre’s New Music Biennial, some dealt with that crossover opportunity more resourcefully than others.

Dialogue by the British-Iranian turntable artist Shiva Feshareki failed to deliver on the promise of its premise: the material, which Feshareki composed for BBC Concert Orchestra and conductor André de Ridder, was pre-recorded, giving her the opportunity to transform it electronically before our ears. This throws up, she explained, the alluring prospect of hearing a transformation before the thing itself has been played orchestrally. In reality, though, the orchestral drones felt too broad and loosely argued to instigate a full-on dialogue between turntable and orchestra.

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New Music Biennial review – from the novel to the

Delivered... Philip Clark | Scene | Sun 7 Jul 2019 4:16 pm

Southbank Centre, London
From a turntable artist’s orchestral remix to Gazelle Twin’s melodic revelry, composers reimagine classical

However deeply electronic composers and turntablists journey inside their own world of sound, the invitation to map their primary musical concerns on to a symphony orchestra usually proves impossible to resist. At the Southbank Centre’s New Music Biennial, some dealt with that crossover opportunity more resourcefully than others.

Dialogue by the British-Iranian turntable artist Shiva Feshareki failed to deliver on the promise of its premise: the material, which Feshareki composed for BBC Concert Orchestra and conductor André de Ridder, was pre-recorded, giving her the opportunity to transform it electronically before our ears. This throws up, she explained, the alluring prospect of hearing a transformation before the thing itself has been played orchestrally. In reality, though, the orchestral drones felt too broad and loosely argued to instigate a full-on dialogue between turntable and orchestra.

Continue reading...

K Flay: Solutions review – reasons to be cheerful

Delivered... Emily Mackay | Scene | Sun 7 Jul 2019 8:01 am

(Night Street/Interscope)

Joining the many trying to find hard-won notes of positivity amid climate catastrophe and political car crashes, Illinois native Kristine Flaherty has dedicated her third album to mustering “green lights, brighter views… to pull me through”, as she puts it on Good News, which rubs dirty analogue synths up against a pure pop chorus.

There are both stronger songs and a wider range of styles here than on her previous records: Not in California brings a grungy, fuzzy languor to its environmental end-times singalong chorus, while the irresistible I Like Myself sits somewhere between the lo-fi pop of Cults and the rhythmic attack and playful cheerleading choruses of Sleigh Bells. The latter spring to mind again on the hard-faced and heavy Bad Vibes, in which she dismisses lazy doom-lovers: “You think it’s cooler to have dark thoughts, never eat ice-cream.” Sister is equally adorable, with a jubilant yell of a chorus over a barrage of those synths, while DNA closes with a widescreen hip-hop epic that sends you off heartened.

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The month’s best mixes: infectious singeli and full-throttle floorfillers

Delivered... Tayyab Amin | Scene | Wed 3 Jul 2019 12:34 pm

DJ Duke and MCZO take flight for 48 minutes of east African dance music, while Gabber Eleganza goes back to the early 90s

Related: The month's best mixes: steely funk, Lisbon tarraxo and hardcore psychedelia

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A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 1 Jul 2019 3:38 pm

Berlin, Frankfurt, Cologne … try Dresden. Rauschen im Tal, a documentary of the emergence of Dresden electronic music, struck a nerve and sold out theaters. And now it’s free to watch (in German, with English subtitles).

Here’s the original trailer for the film, though you get mainly disembodied male voices there:

From the producers’ description:

The noise of a city opens up only to those who are completely immersed. In the early 90s, a new sound appeared. It was an uncompromising electrical noise. Someone said, “This is techno!” At that time, a multitude of people – around this new sound – discovered a new cosmos. The city’s eclectic party life made Dresden a Techno stronghold in the East. Since then, an active music scene developed, an almost 30-year-old culture of electronic music in Saxony’s capital with more than 20 record labels and about two dozen dance clubs.

A new cosmos, indeed.

Also nice – the music takes long breaks to just play tracks, with track IDs – plus some nice interpretive dancing. It’s ideal chill-out watching, a documentary on music that has actual music in it. (The lineup is pretty boy heavy; I’m curious to get feedback from my German neighbors on that and other elements. But it’s still a great introduction.)

This quote: “The best parties I ever played, as far as Europe is concerned, is in Dresden – because I never had to … conform myself to a certain style.” -Melvin Oliphant III. Cough, Berlin, cough. Something to consider.

The full documentary makes a nice watch for exploring the darker corners of Germany’s electronic underground. And of course, as usual, the answer to where “techno” as we now know it came from – Germany or Detroit (or Latin America, or wherever you like) is – yes. All of that. Pairing that often wild and disconnected German identity with the far-off pioneers of America’s scene (and progenitors of ‘techno’ as genre) makes that experience richer. Now as many of those Detroit legends haunt the streets of Berlin, perhaps it’s the perfect time to understand the world of Germany’s own fringe culture, and the unprecedented big bang as a nation was put back together from two pieces, against the collapse of an entire political-economic regime and the global ripples it caused. It says something about Americans that the people pushed out of our own culture were able to find new opportunities and kindred spirits on the other side of the world.

And, actually, maybe the best way to escape techno as history museum is to actually learn the history.

The film, from creators Roman Schlaack, Denis Wrobel, and Thamash Kestawitz, runs just over an hour and a half.

Enjoy!

DE:

Das Rauschen einer Stadt erschließt sich nur demjenigen der ganz eintaucht. Anfang der 90er Jahre tauchte ein neues Geräusch auf. Es war ein kompromissloses elektrisches Geräusch. Irgendjemand sagte: „Das ist Techno!“ Damals eröffnete sich für eine Vielzahl von Menschen – um diesen neuen Klang herum – ein eigener Kosmos. Der vielseitige Partyalltag ließ Dresden zu einer Techno-Hochburg im Osten avancieren. Seitdem entwickelte sich eine aktive Musikszene, eine fast 30 Jahre existierende Kultur der elektronischen Musik in der Sächsischen Hauptstadt mit über 20 Plattenlabels und gut zwei dutzend Tanzklubs.

The post A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 1 Jul 2019 3:38 pm

Berlin, Frankfurt, Cologne … try Dresden. Rauschen im Tal, a documentary of the emergence of Dresden electronic music, struck a nerve and sold out theaters. And now it’s free to watch (in German, with English subtitles).

Here’s the original trailer for the film, though you get mainly disembodied male voices there:

From the producers’ description:

The noise of a city opens up only to those who are completely immersed. In the early 90s, a new sound appeared. It was an uncompromising electrical noise. Someone said, “This is techno!” At that time, a multitude of people – around this new sound – discovered a new cosmos. The city’s eclectic party life made Dresden a Techno stronghold in the East. Since then, an active music scene developed, an almost 30-year-old culture of electronic music in Saxony’s capital with more than 20 record labels and about two dozen dance clubs.

A new cosmos, indeed.

Also nice – the music takes long breaks to just play tracks, with track IDs – plus some nice interpretive dancing. It’s ideal chill-out watching, a documentary on music that has actual music in it. (The lineup is pretty boy heavy; I’m curious to get feedback from my German neighbors on that and other elements. But it’s still a great introduction.)

This quote: “The best parties I ever played, as far as Europe is concerned, is in Dresden – because I never had to … conform myself to a certain style.” -Melvin Oliphant III. Cough, Berlin, cough. Something to consider.

The full documentary makes a nice watch for exploring the darker corners of Germany’s electronic underground. And of course, as usual, the answer to where “techno” as we now know it came from – Germany or Detroit (or Latin America, or wherever you like) is – yes. All of that. Pairing that often wild and disconnected German identity with the far-off pioneers of America’s scene (and progenitors of ‘techno’ as genre) makes that experience richer. Now as many of those Detroit legends haunt the streets of Berlin, perhaps it’s the perfect time to understand the world of Germany’s own fringe culture, and the unprecedented big bang as a nation was put back together from two pieces, against the collapse of an entire political-economic regime and the global ripples it caused. It says something about Americans that the people pushed out of our own culture were able to find new opportunities and kindred spirits on the other side of the world.

And, actually, maybe the best way to escape techno as history museum is to actually learn the history.

The film, from creators Roman Schlaack, Denis Wrobel, and Thamash Kestawitz, runs just over an hour and a half.

Enjoy!

DE:

Das Rauschen einer Stadt erschließt sich nur demjenigen der ganz eintaucht. Anfang der 90er Jahre tauchte ein neues Geräusch auf. Es war ein kompromissloses elektrisches Geräusch. Irgendjemand sagte: „Das ist Techno!“ Damals eröffnete sich für eine Vielzahl von Menschen – um diesen neuen Klang herum – ein eigener Kosmos. Der vielseitige Partyalltag ließ Dresden zu einer Techno-Hochburg im Osten avancieren. Seitdem entwickelte sich eine aktive Musikszene, eine fast 30 Jahre existierende Kultur der elektronischen Musik in der Sächsischen Hauptstadt mit über 20 Plattenlabels und gut zwei dutzend Tanzklubs.

The post A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

‘Michael Eavis didn’t know what dance music is’: a history of rave at Glastonbury

Delivered... Joe Muggs | Scene | Sat 29 Jun 2019 9:00 am

At some point in the late 80s – though no one remembers exactly when – Glastonbury festival became a nexus of the traveller, free party and acid-house scenes, and the festival was never the same again

Giant rubber duckies; tunnels of flowers; bassbins disguised with gingham tablecloths; sitting in upturned burning cars as entertainment. As if it weren’t enough of a struggle trying to get people to untangle their first Glastonbury raving memories from three decades ago, the things they do remember feel pretty hallucinatory on their own.

Nobody can be quite sure when raving first started in Glastonbury. Obviously all-night dancing predates acid house, but through the 80s that meant dub reggae: Youth of Killing Joke and the Orb remembers Saxon and Jah Shaka soundsystems as “the only music you could go dance to all night long that wasn’t acoustic around a bonfire”. The Mutoid Waste Company’s dystopian wreckage sculptures hosted pagan-industrial metal-banging dances throughout the night. Dance music as such wasn’t unknown, though. Mark Darby of Exeter’s Mighty Force collective says: “The first traveller soundsystem playing dance music I personally heard was Crazy Dave’s Record Bus – an old green coach with huge speakers – going through a disco phase, one afternoon at Stonehenge 83!”

Glastonbury is banning single use plastics. The world’s largest greenfield festival wants to avoid scenes of the area in front of its legendary stages being strewn with plastic after the shows have ended. In 2017, visitors to the festival got through 1.3m plastic bottles. 

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Hidden gems on the 2019 Glastonbury lineup

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 26 Jun 2019 2:47 pm

Bewildered by the hundreds of acts at Glastonbury? The Guardian’s music editors pick the best names from lower down the bill

The must-see musical experience of the weekend is this brand-new stage from the Block9 crew, whose club spaces routinely provide the festival’s best after-hours moments. IICON will have artists playing from a giant sculpture of a head, and they’re a who’s who of cutting-edge electronics: galaxy-cartographer Larry Heard, dub geniuses Raime, thunderously angry poet Moor Mother, junglist poet Lee Gamble, South African pairing Okzharp and Manthe Ribane, and tons of forward-thinking techno: Bruce, Zenker Brothers, Karenn and more. Sleep all day, bring a carrier bag of falafels, and you could happily spend your entire weekend here.

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Euphoria here we come! Fatboy Slim on his ‘silent’ Ibiza film with Julien Temple

Delivered... Sam Wollaston | Scene | Tue 25 Jun 2019 12:53 pm

Norman Cook has spent three decades blowing the Ibiza party crowd away. The DJ reveals why he teamed up with the director to capture 2,000 years of the island’s wild, strange history

Superstar DJ Fatboy Slim was recently thinking about – and questioning – what it is he does. “I’m just a middle-aged man playing a lot of loud squelching noises to young people, waving his arms around in the air. What really is that?” he asked himself.

But then it does make them dance and smile, and he, Norman Cook, still enjoys doing it. “It’s not what I would have chosen to be doing at this age” – 55 – “but I’m loving it so much. It’s the best job in the world because I love music, and my love of music involves sharing it with people.”

Ibiza: The Silent Movie is out 5 July and screens at Glastonbury on 26 June.

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WARP take over NTS radio with 100 hours of Eno, FlyLo, Autechre…

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 21 Jun 2019 5:45 pm

What better way to celebrate the solstice and Make Music Day / Fête de la Musique than with 100 hours of all the all stars from Warp Records?

There is some serious stuff in this lineup:

  • Boards of Canada’s first public outing since 2013’s Tomorrow’s Harvest album with a mysterious two hour mix.
  • Aphex Twin presents his one off performance from London’s Barbican Hall in 2012.
  • Brian Eno collaborates with Extinction Rebellion for a powerful radio narrative.
  • Brand new live sessions from Mount Kimbie and Bibio.
  • Mixes of previously unheard music from Autechre, Kelela, Hudson Mohawke, Mark Pritchard, Bibio, Lorenzo Senni, Clark, Plaid, Darkstar and DJ Nigga Fox.
  • Exclusive full-length live sets from Oneohtrix Point Never and Kelly Moran.
  • New mixes from Flying Lotus, Nightmares on Wax, Danny Brown, John Stanier (Battles), Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear), !!!, kwes., GAIKA, LoneLady, Winston Hazel (Forgemasters) and Mira Calix.
  • Live radio shows from the flagship NTS studio in Gillett Square from Squarepusher, Leila and Evian Christ.

And then the guests:

  • An exclusive, extended piece from Death Grips.
  • Mixes from musical pioneers Ryuichi Sakamoto and Adrian Sherwood.
  • A very special mix from Hood By Air’s Shayne Oliver.
  • The Arcola label is represented by Rian Treanor, Bone Head and Primitive Art.
  • Some of Warp’s esteemed visual collaborators also figure prominently, including Weirdcore, Ezra Miller, Hassan Rahim and Tim Saccenti

Full schedule, London time:

Channel 1 – Full Schedule (all times GMT):

Friday 21st June
12.00 – Mark Pritchard
13.00 – Mount Kimbie
13.25 – Bibio
13.36 – Nightmares on Wax
16.00 – Broadcast
17.00 – kwes.
18.00 – Plaid
19.00 – Aphex Twin
19.30 – Death Grips
20.00 – Oneohtrix Point Never
21.40 – Shayne Oliver / HBA
22.00 – Danny Brown
23.00 – Autechre

Saturday 22nd June
00.00 – John Stanier (Battles)
01.00 – !!!
03.00 – Hassan Rahim
04.00 – Tim Saccenti
06.00 – Ezra Miller
07.00 – Broadcast
08.00 – Clark
09.00 – Paul White
10.00 – Lonelady
12.00 – Kelly Moran
13.00 – Bibio
14.00 – Special Request tribute to LFO
16.20 – Adrian Sherwood
17.00 – Leila
18.00 – Hudson Mohawke
19.00 – Bonehead
19.30 – Evian Christ
21.00 – Squarepusher
22.00 – Flying Lotus
23.00 – Ryuichi Sakamoto

Sunday 23rd June
00.00 – Ryuichi Sakamoto
00.30 – Mira Calix
02.30 – Plaid
03.30 – Rian Treanor
04.30 – DJ Nigga Fox
06.00 – Aphex Twin
08.00 – Kelly Moran
09.00 – Primitive Art
10.00 – Lorenzo Senni
11.35 – Weirdcore
12.35 – Bibio
13.00 – Gonjasufi
14.00 – Winston Hazel (Forgemasters)
15.00 – Gaika
16.00 – Extinction Rebellion x Brian Eno
17.00 – Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear / CANT)
18.45 – Darkstar
20.00 – Kelela
21.00 – Boards of Canada
23.00 – Autechre

Check it:

www.nts.live/WXAXRXP

The post WARP take over NTS radio with 100 hours of Eno, FlyLo, Autechre… appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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