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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Music


Explode your face with Detroit Underground’s AR mask, melt it with these releases

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 29 May 2020 7:24 pm

Being a label - hell, being a human - can feel pretty virtual these days. So let's lean into that, huh? Face exploded - filter, check. Face melted - music, yes.

The post Explode your face with Detroit Underground’s AR mask, melt it with these releases appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Lady Gaga: Chromatica review – Gaga rediscovers the riot on her most personal album

Delivered... Michael Cragg | Scene | Fri 29 May 2020 1:11 pm

Returning to the sound of her maximalist electro-pop heyday, Gaga explores buried trauma, mental illness and the complexities of fame on this return to form

A criticism often levelled at Lady Gaga is that the fantastical imagery she constructs around her albums eclipses the music itself. But it’s a sliding scale – and one that certainly mattered less when she was knocking out undeniable dance-pop party starters like Poker Face and Just Dance, or cementing her status as pop’s freaky outlier on the twisted Bad Romance. That she appeared in alien-like form in that song’s video made perfect sense: here was a chameleonic pop superstar in the vein of Bowie, Prince and Madonna opening a portal to an escapist dimension. Later, it made sense that she would lean into the imagery of hair metal on 2011’s gloriously OTT, Springsteen-referencing Born This Way. Yet on 2013’s bloated Artpop – billed as an exploration of the “reverse Warholian” phenomenon in pop culture, whatever that may be, and featuring at least one performance in which she employed a “vomit artist” to puke green paint on her chest – the aesthetic felt more like desperate distraction tactics.

Related: Lady Gaga's 30 greatest songs – ranked!

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The 100 greatest UK No 1s: No 8, The Prodigy – Firestarter

Delivered... Chal Ravens | Scene | Wed 27 May 2020 9:00 am

A surreal and terrifying mix of big-beat pyrotechnics, lyrical vitriol and tabloid outrage. ‘Ban This Sick Fire Record,’ squawked the Mail on Sunday – but it was much too late

It starts with a riff: not a distorted guitar but a contorted squeal from a twisted fairground. It’s a riff nonetheless, the instantly sticky sign of an unstoppable hit single. Firestarter was one of the biggest pop-cultural events of 1996 and by the end of the year the Prodigy were one of the world’s biggest bands. The Essex four-piece’s first No 1 was a flashpoint of teen angst, TV infamy, moral panic and tabloid outrage, carried aloft by big-beat pyrotechnics and a lethal barrage of lyrical vitriol. “Ban This Sick Fire Record,” squawked the Mail on Sunday – but it was much too late.

The Prodigy were already a dominant force in pop. All but one of their singles since 1991 had made the Top 15, including 1991’s Charly, the cartoon-sampling hit that famously “killed rave”, according to clubbers’ bible Mixmag. Liam Howlett, the band’s musical engine, was bored with cranking out rave hits to a formula and started experimenting with elements of hip-hop and rock on their second album, Music for the Jilted Generation. Now the Prodigy were ready to reintroduce themselves as stadium-sized heroes with The Fat of the Land, taking dance music deep into the moshpit while promoting dancer-cum-hypeman Keith Flint to songwriter and vocalist. As an opening salvo, Firestarter was flamboyant, surreal, terrifying – and, like all the best pop songs, totally novel.

Related: Keith Flint: the neon demon who started a fire under British pop

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In Slovakia, the rave goes on: social distancing with a taped-off grid for dancers

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 26 May 2020 5:37 pm

How do you party without putting people at risk – but without killing the reason for partying in the first place? Here’s Slovakia with a novel concept. It’s not that we haven’t had ideas for nightlife in the era of social distancing. It’s that a lot of those take something crucial away. Here in Berlin, […]

The post In Slovakia, the rave goes on: social distancing with a taped-off grid for dancers appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Lockdown playlists for every mood, part three: chosen by Bat for Lashes, Neil Tennant, Jason Williamson and Mike Skinner

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sun 24 May 2020 1:00 pm

Music stars pick soundtracks to get you through the next phase - for moments of melancholy, optimism, escapism and contemplation

At her home of three years in Los Angeles, Natasha Khan and her boyfriend are having a particularly unusual lockdown, because she is six-and-half-months pregnant. “Going through all this on our own is a bit sad,” she says. “But weirdly, it’s a bit of nesting time, anyway. It’s been good to bed down.” She’s also been loving the “incredible colours” of spring blooming all around: the jasmine, tropical plants and orange poppies on the mountains.

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Lockdown playlists for every mood, part two: chosen by Norah Jones, Joe Talbot and Flohio

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sun 24 May 2020 11:00 am

Music stars pick soundtracks to get you through the next phase - for when you’re feeling peaceful, spiritual - or full of energy

In lockdown in New York, Norah Jones and her husband, Pete, have started a new musical tradition: playing Christmas songs every Sunday. Their children – a six-year-old and a four-year-old whose names Jones has always kept anonymous – aren’t impressed. “We’re basically doing it to cheer up the grownups in the house. The kids also don’t like the fact they don’t get any presents! ”

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Lockdown playlists for every mood, part one: chosen by Jarvis Cocker, Haim and Lianne La Havas

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sun 24 May 2020 8:00 am

Music stars pick soundtracks to get you through the next phase, for when you’re feeling angry, in need of a boost - or ready for a dance

Cocker and his partner, Kim, have been keeping their spirits up during lockdown by doing domestic discos on Instagram Live. “You’ve got to go for the uplifting music, haven’t you?”, Cocker says from his home outside Sheffield. “The world’s on pause, after all. It’s time to remind yourself you’re lucky to be here.”

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Fall into the dislocated, glitching rituals of Microhm, latest project of Mexico’s Leslie Garcia

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Thu 21 May 2020 4:43 pm

Life post-apocalypse is mysterious, but somehow comforting – a digitally generated, AI-assisted woven blanket of sounds. There is calm in uncertainty – once you adapt. At least that’s the feeling I get personally, listening to the glitching electro-acoustic ambiance of Microohm, Infinita Incertidumbre. There are yawning caverns, gently shuffling rhythms, persistent electronic rattles and beeps […]

The post Fall into the dislocated, glitching rituals of Microhm, latest project of Mexico’s Leslie Garcia appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Feed yourself with a free cookbook from Korg and the electronic music and synth community

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 21 May 2020 12:13 pm

Here's a different sort of compilation and synth collaboration - KORG Germany in Berlin invited the likes of Joan La Barbara, Suzanne Ciani, Alva Noto, Dave Smith, and a lot of us relative newcomers, too, to make a cookbook. And it's free to download.

The post Feed yourself with a free cookbook from Korg and the electronic music and synth community appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Scene flashback – a who’s who of Detroit techno, circa 1997

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 20 May 2020 12:16 pm

Simon Angel from MTV Party Zone did an extended set of interviews with the Detroiters in 1997. And it’s honestly about as many people from this scene as you can cram into one place. If I had posted this this time last year, it might have felt like nostalgia. But now 1997 feels roughly the […]

The post Scene flashback – a who’s who of Detroit techno, circa 1997 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Moby: All Visible Objects review – misjudged and out of touch

Delivered... Rachel Aroesti | Scene | Fri 15 May 2020 9:00 am

(Mute Records/Little Idiot)
Seeming to prefer penning candid memoirs to exploring new musical material, Moby’s 17th album has vitality but no novelty

Moby’s heydays bookended the 1990s. In 1991, the New York native smooshed together post-punk, 80s disco and the Twin Peaks score into Go, a quintessential rave track that reached No 10 in the UK charts, something he celebrated with spasmodic dancing on Top of the Pops. In 1999, his album Play, which combined American roots and club beats into the kind of dinner party-friendly dance music middle England could really get behind, went six times platinum in the UK. Capturing the zeitgeist at both ends of a decade is no mean feat, and at 54, Moby seems more intent on reflecting on his success than repeating it – nowadays he makes headlines for cringeworthily candid memoirs about his unlikely superstardom rather than any new material.

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Living-room disco: five of the best dance music mixes

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas | Scene | Fri 15 May 2020 9:00 am

Laser-cut minimal techno, chirruping speed garage – here is how you can make the most of our dancefloor-free moment

Hosted by the independent radio station NTS as part of its recent Remote Utopias festival, the Northern Irish dance duo take the BPM down to zero for this Blade Runner-sampling tour through vast columns of arpeggiating synth and clouds of haze, plus spots of bright guitar, piano and mallet percussion. nts.live

Related: The Guide: Staying In – sign up for our home entertainment tips

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From Mexico and around the world, music mixes as salve to anxiety and loneliness

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 11 May 2020 7:24 pm

Dimension Series is broadcasting mixes again from its Mexico City home base, in a tour around the world of every groove and ambiance. It's mood elevation through music - for "Each Other."

The post From Mexico and around the world, music mixes as salve to anxiety and loneliness appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Stay home, patch stuff – watch Eden Grey walk through lovely, layered modular sounds

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 11 May 2020 4:51 pm

Musician and community organizer Eden Grey is sharing some of the sounds she's patching together, and talking about how they're made.

The post Stay home, patch stuff – watch Eden Grey walk through lovely, layered modular sounds appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Florian Schneider obituary

Delivered... Adam Sweeting | Scene | Thu 7 May 2020 4:24 pm

Co-founder of the pioneering German electronic band Kraftwerk

As one of the chief architects of the electronic music pioneers Kraftwerk, Florian Schneider, who has died of cancer aged 73, helped revolutionise popular music. Where guitars, bass and drums had long been considered its essential building blocks, Kraftwerk paved the way for synth-pop, techno, hip-hop and electronica, in the process proving that microchips and machines could have not only soul, but a sense of humour too. The list of artists whose work is indebted to Kraftwerk, even if they did not always know it, is endless, but includes David Bowie, Depeche Mode, Simple Minds, New Order, The Orb, Madonna, Neil Young, Jay-Z, Afrika Bambaataa, Coldplay and Daft Punk. In 1997 the New York Times described Kraftwerk as “the Beatles of electronic dance music”.

With Schneider and Ralf Hütter proving the main creative impetus, Kraftwerk (German for “power station”) reached their pivotal moment with the release of their fourth album, Autobahn (1974), whose 23-minute title track – a euphoric electronic ode to the joys of driving on Germany’s high-speed motorways, delivered with a light and whimsical touch – became emblematic of the group’s sound and approach. The album reached No 4 in Britain, while the single version of Autobahn reached the the UK Top 20 and the German Top 10. This revolution in synthetic music earned Kraftwerk a spot on BBC television’s science programme Tomorrow’s World in 1975. They subsequently scored a UK chart-topping single, The Model, released with Computer Love (1981), but Kraftwerk’s influence was much further-reaching than mere chart positions would suggest.

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