Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » News Feed


VCV Rack modular is about to get gamepad support

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 4:14 pm

Computer or Eurorack, you still want to get those grubby hands on your sounds. So the latest update to the free and open modular platform Rack makes that cheap and easy, with gamepad support.

Developer Andrew Belt is clearly a busy man. His latest update maps from gamepads to virtual voltage inside the software modular environment. Watch via this — uh gentle ambient demo?

Anrew explains on Facebook:

Just added gamepad and computer keyboard support to VCV Rack, soon to be released in Rack 0.6.1.

Joysticks are mapped to voltages -10 to 10V for each axis using the MIDI-CC module from Core with the new “Gamepad” MIDI driver. Buttons can be converted to 10V gates using MIDI-Trig. Similarly to actual MIDI controllers, click the CC or note name display to learn/assign a gamepad joystick/button.

“But I don’t have a USB gamepad controller!”

They’re super cheap on eBay or Amazon by searching “usb gamepad” for around $10. Compare that with $300 MIDI controllers, and this is more fun per dollar if you’re on a budget (so you can save your money for the next upcoming VCV module!)

The “Computer Keyboard” driver supports the QWERTY US layout and spans two octaves with octave up/down buttons.

This update also adds the ability to use the same MIDI device on Windows with multiple virtual MIDI modules. Previously this was caused by the Windows MIDI API requiring exclusive access to each MIDI device, so having multiple instances would crash. I have written a MIDI “multiplexer” that solves this.

Good stuff. I can also imagine an ultra-portable sound rig with a compact PC and a gamepad and keyboard attached – running Linux, of course.

More:
http://vcvrack.com/

Speaking of Linux, until there’s native support in JACK at some point, hopefully, there’s already a hack for the best audio system on Linux (and the best way of piping sound between software):

https://gitlab.com/sonusdept/hijack

Oh yeah, and while VCV Rack is free (with inexpensive software add-ons for high-quality modules), there is this problem – it could make you buy hardware.

The post VCV Rack modular is about to get gamepad support appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Get a powerful spectral delay, free, in MSpectralDelay plug-in

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 3:29 pm

What makes a delay more interesting? A delay that’s combined with spectral controls. What makes that better? Getting it for free. MSpectralDelay is here – and looks like a must-download.

It’s been a while – I’m sure I’m not alone in missing Native Instruments’ Spektral Delay, discontinued some years back. MSpectralDelay is a different animal – NI’s offering had a whopping 160 bands, whereas this has just six – but you do get a powerful, musical interface that lets you treat delays in a different way.

The idea is this: divide up your sound by frequency, with one to six bands, then add the delay effect with tempo sync and apply modulation.

What the developers Melda have done that set their offering apart is to provide really precise parameter controls with clear visual feedback, MIDI control of everything, and clever features like automatic gain compensation and a “safety” limiter to prevent you from overdriving the results.

Also surprising: not only is there mid/side processing, but you can set up to eight channels of surround, offering some spatial applications.

Melda plugins also feature some nice standard features like modulators with time signatures, morphing and preset recall, different channel modes, and more.

Full feature list from the devs:

The most advanced user interface on the market – stylable, resizable, GPU accelerated
Dual user interface, easy screen for beginners, edit screen for professionals
Unique visualisation engine with classic meters and time graphs
1-6 fully configurable independent bands
Modulators
Adjustable oscillator shape technology
Multiparameters
M/S, single channel, up to 8 channels surround processing…
Smart randomization
Automatic gain compensation (AGC)
Safety limiter
Adjustable up-sampling 1x-16x
Synchronization to host tempo
MIDI controllers with MIDI learn
64-bit processing and an unlimited sampling rate
Extremely fast, optimized for newest AVX2 capable processors
Global preset management and online preset exchange
Supports VST, VST3, AU and AAX interfaces on Windows & Mac, both 32-bit and 64-bit
No dongle nor internet access is required for activation
Free-for-life updates

There’s also this kind of funny demo video, which first explains why you want a delay, and then – as is custom in our industry – tell you that, naturally, everyone from complete beginners who barely know how to switch on their computer to advanced professionals will be able to have exactly the same experience because presets parameters blah blah.

That said… well, you do need a delay. And this is awesome. And beginners and pros will probably have fun with it. And there are presets. So… fair points, all.

Go grab it:

http://www.meldaproduction.com/MSpectralDelay

via Sonic State

Free download requires registration; the offer ends June 3.

The post Get a powerful spectral delay, free, in MSpectralDelay plug-in appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

8 Tracks That Defined The Soviet Era’s Industrial Scene

Delivered... By Andrew Lee and Jenya Gorbunov | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 10:53 am

The post 8 Tracks That Defined The Soviet Era’s Industrial Scene appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Debate: Archive and Sampling

Delivered... norient | Scene | Wed 23 May 2018 6:00 am

Today the copying and sampling of not just sound but of all material from infinite sources challenges the «spectacular aura» of the pre-recorded original in order to claim autonomy. We asked musicians from the Norient network: How Does the Digital Availability of Sources Change Music? A virtual debate from the Norient exhibition Seismographic Sounds (see and order corresponding book here).

Abandoned School Archive (Photo © by publicdomainpictures/Lode Van de Velde, 2018)

Complete Debate: The Video

Quotes

«My sample library is full of glitchy sounds. I started to build it years ago and I’m continuously updating it. It works like this: I make recordings from prepared instruments or amplified objects, or I record jams with digital instruments. Then I work with these sounds, paying close attention to details. I can spend hours designing just one three hundred milliseconds glitch, or I can build a huge wall of sound out of intersecting layers. These layers create beautiful and dense textures that I’m gradually transforming in my software by changing many parameters at each moment. I edit my samples to the point that they gain a totally new identity — all associations are gone and in the end just their aesthetic qualities count. Success is when I can make thousands of variations from a single sample. These sounds define my library. I think that gives a certain stamp to all of my works.»

Svetlana Maraš, composer and sound artist (Serbia)

«I sample my own music. It helps to exaggerate my egomania. By recombining myself my self-referential cosmos grows day by day.»

Christoph Ogiermann, composer, singer, instrumentalist and conductor in the fields of of contemporary music and free improvisation (Germany)

«Everything is a remix.»

Joe Bennett, Popular Music Scholar (Great Britain)

«Art and music in an archive will function like words in our minds. In the near future we will reuse them at will, just like we create sentences.»

Eduardo Navas, Remix Studies Scholar (USA)

Video Debate Credits

Statements by
Eduardo Navas, Remix Studies Scholar (USA)
Joe Bennett, Popular Music Scholar (Great Britain)
Christoph Ogiermann, composer, singer, instrumentalist and conductor in the fields of of contemporary music and free improvisation (Germany)
Garo Gdanian, Metal Musician (Lebanon)
Svetlana Maraš, composer and sound artist (Serbia)

Video Cut: Stephan Hermann, Coupdoeil

Some quotes from this debate were published in the second Norient book Seismographic Sounds. Click on the image to know more.

Read More on Norient

> Eduardo Navas: «Regenerative Culture»
> Hannes Liechti: «Perspectives on Sampling»
> Thomas Burkhalter: «The Sample Shapes the Song»

Debates from Seismographic Sounds

> on Bedroom Producers
> on Power and Positions
> on Music and War

Patterning 2 is coming, and it’s going to be awesome

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 11:30 pm

First Oympia Noise Co brought us Patterning, and we loved it, now they bring us Patterning 2, the next generation of the circular drum machine. With the same intuitive interface that is both easy to use and deep with features for the experienced producer. Patterning 2 is a whole new app and not an update to the existing version. The new app is on pre-order right now for

Here’s what’s new in Patterning 2:

  • Recording Beats & Automation
  • Drum Kit Switching
  • Randomize (Almost) Everything
  • Next Generation Ratcheting
  • Coarse Tune Quantization
  • Quantized Pattern Launch
  • Sample Folders
  • Loop Rotate
  • Pattern Tempo Changes
  • Divide Mode Measure Length
  • New Automation Layers
  • Ableton Link Start/Stop
  • MIDI Learn Recording
  • MIDI Drum Triggering
  • MIDI Only Tracks
  • Custom MIDI CC Outputs
  • MIDI Gate Length Automation
  • Under the Hood Performance Improvements
  • Workflow Enhancements
  • And more…

Other Key Features:

  • Download hundreds of free factory and user-created drum kits.
  • Export directly to an Ableton Live Set or perfect audio loops.
  • Deep integration with MIDI for controlling and being controlled by hardware gear.
  • Sync with Ableton Live and other apps using Ableton Link.

SPECIFICATIONS :

iOS 10+, Recommended for iPad 3 and newer, Languages : English

PATTERNS

  • Unique circular sequencer with independent settings for each loop in each pattern. Create poly-metric and poly-rhythmic beats like never before.
  • Variable loop lengths from 1 to 64 steps.
  • Step durations from a thirty-second note up to a whole note, with dotted notes and triplets along the way.
  • NEW : Next generation ratcheting with unique “ratchet decay” setting for creating textural rolls and fast subdivisions of the beat.
  • NEW : Quantized pattern launching. Launch a pattern on the next down beat, nearest 32nd note, 16 measures in the future or anywhere in between.
  • Get wild with loop modes : Forwards, Reverse, Urn (random without repeating), and two Pendulum modes.
  • Auto-Rotate feature spins the loop after each rotation to create evolving rhythms.
  • NEW : Change a loop’s starting point with the new loop rotate feature. Nudge loops slightly off the grid or rotate by subdivisions of a step.
  • NEW : Updated Divide mode allows you to explore exotic polyrhythms like 7 against 11, 35 against 36, or even 3 against 4. New in version 2 is the ability to change the measure length of divide mode.
  • NEW : Attach tempo changes to patterns to change up the pace. Slide gradually to the new tempo or jump immediately to it.
  • 64 bits of sample velocity sensitivity. (That’s a lot of sensitivity!)
  • Draw and erase tools.
  • Special “Pen Echo” mode for quick entry of repeating patterns.

AUDIO & ABLETON LIVE EXPORT

  • Easily export multitrack or stereo audio files from Patterning.
  • Export directly to an Ableton Live Set with individual tracks for audio and MIDI. Includes a free copy of Ableton Live Lite! Get the download link from the Export window.

DRUM KITS & SAMPLES

  • NEW : Dynamically swap drum kits, changing samples and settings when a Pattern changes.
  • NEW : Download 100s of free factory and user generated drum kits with Cloud Kits. New kits are being added all the time!
  • NEW : Organize samples into folders.
  • NEW : Create your own kits and export them to share with other Patterning users via Cloud Kits.
  • Easy import your own samples with Dropbox, Audioshare, Files, or iTunes File Sharing.

INSTRUMENTS

  • NEW : Randomization of instrument parameters.
  • NEW : Quantized Coarse Tuning for easy melodic compositions. Works with randomization for randomly generated melodies.
  • Sample start and end times.
  • Sample gain.
  • Attack, hold, decay envelope for shaping the amplitude of your sounds.
  • Coarse and fine tuning.
  • 2 choke groups.
  • Multimode filter with variable resonance and cutoff frequency.
  • Delay and reverb sends.
  • Panning
  • Mute / Solo
  • Track Volume
  • Amazing visualizer!

AUTOMATION

  • Automation layers for animating track parameters : coarse and fine tuning, effects sends, panning, filter frequency and resonance, probability, and envelope settings.
  • NEW : Automate Parameter Randomization Amount.
  • NEW : Ratchet Count and Ratchet Decay automation.
  • NEW : Automate MIDI CCs & MIDI Gate Length.
  • NEW : Automation Record toggles on when recording is enabled.
  • NEW : Record automation using MIDI controllers.

NEW : RECORDING & MIDI INPUT

  • NEW : Record Pads allow you for recording patterns.
  • NEW : Overdub while recording to add parts one at a time.
  • NEW : Assign a MIDI controller to pads to play Patterning with using an external controller or to record.
  • NEW : Metronome
  • NEW : Quickly clear patterns or loops.
  • Use MIDI Learn to control Patterning with external MIDI devices. Customizable MIDI mapping to parameter ranges.

SONG MODE

  • Fill the timeline with patterns to create songs.
  • Seamlessly toggle timeline on and off during playback.
  • Loop mode for endless pattern sequences.
  • Double tap to jump to a block in the timeline.
  • Time signature and snap settings for maximum flexibility.
  • Multiple selection in timeline for quick duplication and editing.

FX

  • Digital Delay with feedback filter.
  • Tempo sync & free delay time modes.
  • 3 band EQ.
  • Unique distortion unit.
  • Reverb.

MIDI

  • Instrument MIDI settings allows maximum flexibility for ports, channels, and pitch.
  • Coarse Tune > MIDI Note automation for melodic MIDI sequencing.
  • Fine Tune > Pitch Bend automation for automating MIDI pitch bend.
  • NEW : Create MIDI CC automation lanes.
  • NEW : MIDI Note Length automation. Lengths longer than 100% are tied to successive notes to make longer MIDI notes.
  • Rock solid MIDI clock sync receive and send.
  • NEW : Audio/MIDI/Both setting to configure instrument output.
  • NEW : MIDI Settings are now accessible on the main PATTERN screen.
  • Import MIDI settings for quick MIDI mapping templates.

INTER-APP AUDIO

  • Master or individual track outputs for processing in IAA host apps like AUM and Audiobus.
  • Inter-App Audio clock sync and transport via the main IAA port.

ABLETON LINK

  • Use Ableton Link to sync Patterning to other devices or apps wirelessly. It’s like magic!
  • NEW : Link Start/Stop Support
  • NEW : Link Quantum Setting for configuring start/stop timing.

Patterning is available for pre-order for $14.99 on the app store with an expected release date of 31 July.

The post Patterning 2 is coming, and it’s going to be awesome appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Copyright Royalty Board Announces Proposed New SoundExchange Royalties for Business Establishment Services

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 4:52 pm

While Copyright Royalty Board decisions on royalties for webcasters, Sirius XM and mechanical royalties get most of the attention, the CRB also sets rates paid by “business establishment services” for the “ephemeral copies” made in their music businesses. Business establishment services are the companies that provide music to businesses to play in retail stores, restaurants and other commercial establishments. These services have come a long way from the elevator music that once was so derided – and now set the mood in all sorts of businesses with formats as varied as the commercial businesses themselves.  While the rates paid by these services pay for music rights is a little off-topic for this blog, these rates are a bit unusual, so they are worth mentioning.  The Copyright Royalty Board just announced a proposed settlement between the services that were participating in the CRB case and SoundExchange which will raise the rates gradually from the current 12.5% of revenue to 13.5% over the next 5 years, with a minimum annual fee of $20,000, up from $10,000. These rates, which apply to any company that does not negotiate direct royalties with the sound recording copyright holders, go into effect in 2019 and will be in place through 2023. Comments on these proposed rates are due June 18, though CRB rules limit the consideration of comments from those who were not participants in the proceeding.

We have written about the rates paid by these services before (see for instance our articles here, here and here).  What makes them unusual is that the royalties are not paid to SoundExchange for the public performance of sound recordings, as are the royalties paid by other digital music services including webcasters (here and here) or Sirius XM.  That is because, in adopting Section 114 of the Copyright Act, Congress did not want to impose on businesses a new performance right, as there is no general public performance right in sound recordings in the United States.  Businesses and other services that do not digitally transmit performances of audio recordings have no obligation to pay copyright holders in the sound recordings (usually the record companies) or artists for the public performance of music.  Users do, however, pay fees for the public performance of the underlying composition through ASCAP, BMI and SESAC and GMR.  As we wrote here, the Register of Copyrights has suggested that a general public performance right in sound recordings be paid in the United States. But that would impose new fees on all businesses that use recorded music in the US, from stadiums playing “We Will Rock You” at the appropriate point in a big game, to DJs spinning their discs in nightclubs, to the trendy tunes playing in the hip clothing retail stores, to over-the-air radio. This proposal is therefore very controversial.  So, if they are not paying public performance fees, why do background music services have to pay SoundExchange?

Payments are made for the “ephemeral copies” made by these services, and paid under Section 112 of the Copyright Act.  Ephemeral copies are those copies made in the digital transmission process – everything from the server copies that the music services make in their music storage systems when they put the programming together to the copies made elsewhere on the Internet as these tunes make their way to the ultimate user.  If a retailer just wanted to play CDs in its stores, there would be no SoundExchange liability as there would be no ephemeral copies (though, in all but the smallest businesses, there would still be an obligation to pay ASCAP, BMI and SESAC and GMR to the extent that their songs are used.  But the digital transmission makes the difference.

The rates themselves are interesting, in that they are actually so high for business establishment services for copies that are essentially transitory.  As we have written before, there are debates as to whether these ephemeral copies really have any independent value at all.  In connection with royalties for other digital music services, they are in effect treated as part of the performance royalty, and are usually just a percentage (under 10%) of that royalty.  But, in connection with the Business Establishment Service, where they are the entire royalty, they are 12.5%-13.5% of the entire revenue of the business – presumably just a way of getting a performance royalty by a different name.

But business establishment services – those services creating music to be sold to commercial establishments to use in their businesses, need to be aware of the new royalties and the higher fees that kick in on January 1, 2019.

FL Studio 20 for Windows and now Mac, with Hell-freezing functionality

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 1:21 pm

FL Studio aka Fruity Loops has hit a version the developers are dubbing FL Studio 20. At age 20, the software still includes lifetime free updates – and a bunch of new features, including freezing of audio, and Hell freezing over.

The “Hell freezing over” bit you’ll see a lot around this release. It’s a reference to a claim developers Image-Line made that they’d add native Mac support “when Hell freezes over.” The comment at the time wasn’t so outrageous: FL Studio had been built a Windows-native development toolchain that made porting unthinkable. And while about ten years ago the company flirted with using emulation layer WINE to provide rudimentary support, that approach wasn’t terribly satisfying.

Now, Mac users can be first class FL Studio citizens if they so choose. FL Studio 20 is entirely Mac native – not running any kind of emulation. Of course, it may be hard to Image-Line to shake the Windows association, and some Mac users are coming the opposite direction, opting for the power-for-price ratio on Windows PCs. But the Mac still represents a huge portion of musicians, and this means choosing FL doesn’t require choosing a particular OS.

(I will say, though – a new Razer Blade is out. And even the old Razer Blade remains cheaper and better equipped than the Mac. Now you do have to disable some Windows 10 annoyances, like a CPU-hogging malware check and automatic updates on by default. Ahem.)

Hell isn’t the only thing FL Studio can freeze. You can now bounce selected audio and pattern clips to audio, render clips to audio, consolidate clips or tracks or takes by bouncing, and more. That’s a huge difference in the FL workflow.

There are plenty of other new features in version 20, too:

Time Signature support (both in playlists and patterns, independently – so, yes, polymetric support if you like – and you thought FL Studio was just for 4/4 trance.)

Playlist Arrangements. Here’s something I find I’m often missing in linear DAWs – you can now set up multiple alternate arrangements, including audio, automation, and pattern clips, all in one project. That could be massive for tasks from trying out alternative song ideas to specific game or live performance sound designs. (I could see a theater show design using this … or fitting a score to different versions of a film trailer … and so on.)

Plugin Delay Compensation, rebuilt. FL already had delay compensation, both automatic and plugin varieties, but it’s been rebuilt from the ground up, say the developers. And it sounds very useful: “Mixer send compensation, Wet/Dry mixer FX compensation, Audio input compensation, Metronome compensation, Plugin Wrapper custom values remembered per-plugin and improved PDC controls in the Mixer.”

Graph Editor is back! This should never really have left, but a “classic” FL feature has returned, letting you edit MIDI information from the Channel Rack – a very Fruity Loops workflow.

Better recording. There’s now a live display of recorded audio and automatic grouping of tracks as you record – both overdue but welcome.

There are loads of improvements to various plugins, of course, plus lots of other fixes and improvements. Details in the manual:

New Features in FL Studio 20

It’s also pretty remarkable that FL Studio has hit 20 years without ditching its lifetime free upgrade policy. FL users have a substantially different relationship with the software than do users of most typical DAWs, both because of its unique workflow and interface and that lifetime policy. But I’m personally intrigued to give it another go – bouncing and working delay compensation make a big dfference, and FL remains a peculiar, interesting toybox full of nice stuff. I think the fact that FL has perhaps not been taken as seriously as tools like Cubase or Ableton Live might itself be a badge of honor – if you can adapt to its often nonstandard ways of working, it offers some big rewards on a small budget.

Announcing FL STUDIO 20 [FL Studio News]

And… uff… Image-Line again launch with a video with truly terrible music. (Sorry, guys!) But… who cares? Go make whatever music you want in it. It’s a production tool!

How to watch the Image-Line launch video without clawing out your eadrums

Okay, so… I have a theory.

Maybe one reason people assume FL Studio is for people making terrible dance music is … because Image-Line (sorry, guys) insist on putting terrible dance music beds underneath the videos. Oh, sure, Ableton can throw a big posh party in Berlin and toss moody high-contrast artist photos beneath a stylish typeface they hired a London design consultancy to choose for them. FL Studio’s video is slightly more … uh … pedestrian.

So I’ve found a solution. First, cue up this delightful live performance of “Söngur heiftar” by classic Icelandic black metal band Misþyrming. It’s a little longer than the FL Studio 20 launch video, so don’t panic … you’ve got up to 60 seconds to then hit play on the FL Studio launch video, and hit the mute button in YouTube.

It’s the “Dark Side of the Moon” / Wizard of Oz approach to making music tech marketing videos more palatable. And it kind of fits. You’re welcome.

You’ll need the sound back on for this one, but here’s an extended tutorial video explaining what’s new:

The post FL Studio 20 for Windows and now Mac, with Hell-freezing functionality appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

We are going to play a different set at Imagica: Lost Stories – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... "Indian Electronic Music" - Google News | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 12:06 pm

RadioandMusic.com

We are going to play a different set at Imagica: Lost Stories
RadioandMusic.com
MUMBAI: Duo Prayag Mehta and Rishabh Joshi called by their stage name Lost Stories, have been a frontrunner of the electronic dance music in India for quite some time now. They are truly known for their songs which are official remixes for Alan Walker ...

IceGear Instruments release their latest synth – Kronecker the clockwork synthesizer

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Tue 22 May 2018 12:02 am

IceGear Instruments have brought us a range of excellent synths over the years, from their very first app Argon, right through to their latest series of iOS synths. Their latest creation is intriguing to say the least. Kronecker is described as a synthesizer that’s like a clockwork toy with a mechanism that is able to rhythmically trigger sounds like a rhythm machine each time you press a key on the keyboard.

In addition to synchronizing the trigger speed to the tempo, you can gradually increase the speed or slow it down after pressing the key. This makes it possible to produce synthesizer sounds similar to the sounds bounced by the bouncing ball. Which I’m sure is something we all have wanted to do at some point right?

The app has four emitters, which means that Kronecker emits particles of sound made from both FM tones and noise. At the emitter you can specify at what time the sound particles will be triggered. It is also possible to add changes such that the pitch of the particles gradually increases.

Particles of the sound emitted by the emitter can be processed with two resonators, and you can reproduce the sound of particles jumping over strings and pipes.

Kronecker works not only on the iPad but also on the iPhone. It also supports Audio Unit Extensions (AUv3), so you can plug in to AUv3 compatible host. For each screen size, different layouts are designed to be easy to use and intuitive. The app also supports Inter-App Audio, Audiobus and Ableton Link.

Kronecker costs $7.99 on the app store

The post IceGear Instruments release their latest synth – Kronecker the clockwork synthesizer appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

RMLC Initiates Rate Court Proceeding with BMI to Set Radio Royalties – What Does It Mean?

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 21 May 2018 1:06 pm

Last week, the Radio Music License Committee (RMLC), the organization representing most commercial radio broadcasters in negotiating performance royalties for musical compositions, initiated a proceeding in US District Court in the Southern District of New York against BMI.  This action raises short-term issues as to what this particular lawsuit means for the radio industry, and it also highlights longer term issues that may arise through legislative and regulatory changes that may affect these cases like this one in the future.

As we have written many times (see e.g here and here), BMI is subject to antitrust consent decrees governing its activities – including the rates that it charges to companies wanting to use the music that it licenses.  When BMI and a user cannot agree on the terms of the license, either party can initiate a proceeding in court for the court to determine what reasonable rates are for the use proposed.  These actions are all brought in the Southern District of New York where a specific judge is assigned to hear BMI disputes.  This proceeding is referred to as a “rate court” proceeding where the parties will present evidence as to what each believes to be a reasonable rate – with the judge making the decision, subject to review by the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.  What issues brought BMI and RMLC to Court?

While we won’t know all the details until they are fully litigated, some of the issues are clear.  BMI’s prior license with broadcasters expired over a year ago.  While RMLC was able to agree to a new license with ASCAP (whose license expired at the same time), which kept ASCAP rates essentially stable from the prior 4-year term, it has not been able to reach agreement with BMI on the rates to govern the period from 2017-2021.  RMLC-represented stations have been paying BMI at an interim rate – the rate set for the prior period.  This interim rate is subject to a true-up based on the final decision.  RMLC has been contending that the BMI rates, which were essentially equivalent with those of ASCAP in the past, should decrease.  This is because, according to RMLC, BMI’s market share has dropped – at least partially due to defections to GMR and other licensing organizations.  BMI has disputed that contention (see its statement on the initiation of the rate court proceeding here).  As the parties could not agree on a rate, RMLC has asked the court to decide on the rate to be charged.  There could be a settlement while the case is litigated – if for no other reason than to avoid the costs of litigation which can be high given the costs of discovery between the parties and a trial where each party would present evidence, including economic experts as to what a fair new rate should be.  If there is no settlement, it may take quite some time until the final decision is rendered.

It is worth noting that this case takes place in the shadow of potential changes to the rate court process.  As we wrote in our article on the proposed Music Modernization Act, there are provisions in that bill which if enacted would change the way these proceedings are conducted.  No longer would there be a single judge assigned to hear all BMI cases.  Instead, these cases would rotate among all the judges on the District Court – so the judge hearing the case would not necessarily have the institutional knowledge of past decisions on rate issues that the current BMI judge has.  In addition, the bill would allow the rates paid by music services to SoundExchange for the public performance of sound recordings to be used as evidence in these rate court cases.  However, the bill specifically exempts broadcast cases from the use of such evidence, as broadcasters do not pay sound recording performance royalties for their over-the-air transmissions.  So, in this case brought by RMLC, even if the Music Modernization Act had already been enacted, evidence of the SoundExchange rates would be excluded.

Looking even further into the future, there are other issues on the horizon for broadcasters in connection with this kind of case.  First, while sound recording performance royalties would be excluded from consideration directly in broadcast royalty cases under the Music Modernization Act, these cases often look for evidence as to the proper rate to be paid at royalties paid by similar services.  As time goes on and digital competitors provide more and more radio-like services, and as radio moves more aggressively to confront digital competition, you could see a rate court judge looking at the royalties paid by these services – where the value of sound recordings will be considered – as establishing comparable rates that should be adopted for broadcasters.  Thus, the cost of the SoundExchange royalties could factor into future broadcast cases indirectly, as broadcast rates are compared to those of other services.

Even more fundamentally, the current Department of Justice Antitrust Division, which represents that public in connection with the consent decrees, has been making noises about wanting to review all outstanding consent decrees to see if they are worth retaining – including specifically those that govern ASCAP and BMI.  We will write more extensively about a world without ASCAP and BMI consent decrees soon, but it is worth noting now that a world without consent decrees would be a world without rate courts – unless some substitute is found before any action is taken to dismantle the consent decrees.  Again, while not a consideration for the current case, this is a factor to weigh in looking at broadcast royalties long-term.

We’ll follow this case and report on it further as it develops.

 

 

FAC Envolver brings envelope following to iOS AUv3 hosts

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 10:54 pm

Mr Corvest has become a somewhat prolific developer in the iOS world since he first appeared. His latest creation is FAC Envolver.

The app is an envelope follower, this implies that it tracks the contour of the input signal and builds a corresponding envelope. Think of the envelope as the outline of the graphical representation of a rectified version of your input signal. By its very essence, it’s exactly what you get. But the process does not stop there and gives you the ability to modify the shape according to a set of provided parameters.

So it’s possible to define the rise and fall time as well as the depth of the envelope or also to invert it. Those parameters are the key to ensure the flexibility of the effect, and to meet the goal you are looking for.

The previous lines are more a general presentation of what an envelope follower does, but the particularity of FAC Envolver, which makes it an outstanding and versatile tool, is that it delivers the envelope via MIDI control change messages or commonly referred to as CC.

The key is to map the CC number parameter to the volume, cutoff, resonance control of your synthesizer or effect units. By doing so you will get instant additional hands to tweak your parameters automatically depending on what you are currently playing.

The internal signal path is built around two independant channels, having one envelope circuit detection per input signal. So the left input signal is wired to the envelope one, and the right input signal is wired to the envelope two.

FAC Envolver will breathe life into your sound, providing interesting natural modulation that will always be different by nature. Following the diagram below, the sound flows from the left to right or from the input to the output.

Input

  • Gain (up to 15db) Use it carefully
  • Audio output activated or mute
  • Monoize input signal for detection
  • [ON] Mono for each env
  • [OFF] Left for first env and Right for second env

Output envelope 1 (L) and 2 (R)

  • Mute – left buttons (|1/ or |2/) are toggleable (gray muted/yellow activated)
  • Rise – defines the time the envelope takes to rise. Set to minimum to catch the transient.
  • Fall – defines the time the envelope takes to fall. Set to maximum for more slew between peaks
  • Depth – provides attenuation or amplification of the envelope
  • Multi-waveform graph – envelope contour layered over input signal. Touch the graph to freeze the display temporarily.
  • Invert – invert the envelope
  • CC# – number of the control change messages where the envelope is sent (channel 1). Only one CC can be used at time per output.

FAC Envolver costs $6.99 on the app store now

The post FAC Envolver brings envelope following to iOS AUv3 hosts appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Bram Bos brings their latest iOS AUv3 FX, Perforator, for creating rhythmic patterns from pads, strings, and drones

Delivered... Ashley Elsdon | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 4:01 pm

Bram Bos brings out yet another innovative AUv3 effect to put into your host. Perforator lets you add rhythm to simple sustained sounds, which is something that I’ve been hoping would arrive on the iOS scene for a while now.

The app is a rhythmic gating audio effect that will creatively snip, cut, gap and filter incoming audio to create rhythmic patterns out of your pads, strings, drones or any other audio stream you decide to feed through it.

By tuning the slice envelopes you can create anything from classic staccato “trance gate” sounds to emulations of sloppy pumping sidechain compression.

Two gating mechanisms can be dialled in: an AMP EG gate (the traditional way of gating) and a 12dB/Oct lowpass filter which will rapidly carve away high frequencies from your sound to effectively silence them.

  • AUv3 Audio Effect, works in all AU compatible hosts
  • automatically syncs with your project’s tempo
  • edit Left an Right channel independently
  • built-in preset manager with a ton of factory presets
  • all AU Parameters exposed for host automation
  • Universal: works on iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch
  • Bonus Feature: AU MIDI output*

Perforator requires iOS10 (iPad 4, iPhone 5S, iPod 6G and higher) and an AU compatible host app. Perforator has standalone functionality with basic IAA and Audiobus 3 support for demonstration purposes only. Using the AUv3 plugin is recommended.

* AU MIDI: both envelopes (L+R) can send their values out as MIDI CC messages to mimic ‘parameter lock’ messages in other plugins/apps. Note: this feature requires iOS11+ and a host compatible with AU MIDI from effects.

Perforator costs just $3.99 on the app store now

The post Bram Bos brings their latest iOS AUv3 FX, Perforator, for creating rhythmic patterns from pads, strings, and drones appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Chvrches: ‘It only takes two seconds to say: I don’t agree with white supremacy’

Delivered... Kate Mossman | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 9:00 am

The Glaswegian synth-pop trio rose to fame on the back of relentless touring, even as frontwoman Lauren Mayberry fended off online abuse. Their new album finds them aiming for the top

Lauren Mayberry has two boiled eggs waiting for her at home. Chvrches are about to go on tour for a year and a half, and she wants the protein. When I first met the band, in a Thistle hotel in east London in 2012, Mayberry was strengthening her diaphragm for the demands of singing live. On the back of their debut album, they played 365 dates in two years and the diaphragm worked out fine.

Chvrches could not have known, sitting in that unremarkable hotel, what direction their rise to fame would take. Mayberry is a frontwoman developing in plain sight, through a well-publicised struggle with particularly vicious internet trolls to where she is now: living in New York and making records with wizard producer Greg Kurstin. There have been some impressive associations along the way: being interviewed by Corin Tucker of Sleater-Kinney; campaigning for girls’ empowerment with Amy Poehler; support slots for Depeche Mode. She is coming to terms with the fact that if you are famous, you will always be someone’s projection. “I definitely fall into one of two categories,” she says brightly, sucking an ice tea. “Diminutive, wet-blanket snowflake or angry feminist bitch.”

I don’t want to sound negative here but I don’t know any lady that was surprised by #MeToo

Continue reading...

Supreme Court Strikes Down Law against Sports Betting – But Broadcasters Need to Proceed with Caution

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Sun 20 May 2018 4:44 am

On Monday, the US Supreme Court issued an opinion striking down a Federal law (the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act or “PASPA”) which prohibited state legislatures from taking any action to legalize betting on sports. PASPA also contained a restriction on advertising sports betting. The state of New Jersey challenged that law, arguing that it improperly limited the authority of state legislatures to act. The Supreme Court agreed, and invalidated the entire Act, including the restriction on advertising sports betting. Some trade press articles have suggested that this signals a boom for broadcasters and other ad-supported media companies as companies rush to start advertising legal sports betting now that the prohibition is gone. While in the long run that may be true, and there may be immediate benefits to stations in certain states, there are numerous caveats for broadcasters to consider before they recognize an advertising boom from sports betting companies.

The entire decision was not based on any analysis of whether or not betting on sports is a good thing, but instead it was a decision based exclusively on a question of state’s rights. The Supreme Court determined that Congress cannot tell state legislatures what they can and cannot do. While Congress may have the authority to ban or otherwise regulate sports betting, if they wanted to regulate it, they should have done so directly. Instead, as the law prohibited state legislatures from taking action to legalize sports betting and other actions predicated on that limitation on states rights, the Supreme Court determined that this was an exercise of authority that Congress does not have – Congress can’t tell state legislatures what to do. Based on the Court’s analysis that all parts of the act were premised on this ban on state legislative actions, the entire law was struck down. That means that there is no blanket federal ban on sports betting, and it leaves each state to regulate as it may wish. For companies ready to take bets on sporting events, and media companies who want to take advertising from sports betting companies, in most cases they need to wait for the states to make decisions on how to proceed.

As the Court noted, at the time of the passage of the legislation, three states (including Nevada) already had laws allowing betting on sports. Apparently, in addition to New Jersey, several other states have already passed laws allowing sports betting if the Supreme Court permitted it. And bills are pending to legalize sports betting in many other states. But there are many states in which there is no clear law permitting sports betting. As DraftKings and FanDuel found out in recent years as they attempted to establish their fantasy sports business, in many states local authorities were ready to challenge their authority to do so under state laws banning sports betting. While some of these laws were amended to allow for fantasy games, many still prohibit straight-on sports betting. Thus, as long as there are prohibitions in state law against sports betting, media companies in those states need to be restrained in their advertising for this activity.

Even in states where the concept of sports betting has been adopted, the state may still need to adopt regulations to implement the law, and licenses may need to be issued to companies who want to take advantage of the change in the law. And, in the days since the Supreme Court’s ruling, there have even been suggestions that Congress could step in and adopt some sort of legislation limiting sports betting, or that it could legislate some royalty to the sports leagues in connection with permissible betting. In short, broadcasters need to consult local counsel to carefully analyze the laws in their states in making decisions on whether or not they can take ads for sports betting.

Once permitted, there will also be questions of whether stations can take ads for legalized betting in other states. There was a Supreme Court case, Edge Broadcasting, upholding a federal law that restricts stations in a state that has no state lottery from advertising the state lottery in an adjacent state. See our post here about an FCC decision fining a station for violating this law by running an ad for an adjacent state’s lottery.   But there is also a Supreme Court ruling in the Greater New Orleans case that has been considered to permit truthful advertising for legal casino gambling. How sports betting will be treated remains to be seen.  Note, too, that there may well be further litigation to decide these issues.

Also, broadcasters should consider restrictions that may exist in various program contracts that can restrict specific types of advertising. As we wrote here, many sports leagues have restrictions in their contracts as to the type of ads that can be run when their games are being shown. Sports betting is likely to be included among the categories of impermissible advertising in many such contracts. Broadcasters should also consider the age of the audience for programs in which any advertising is being run to make sure that that audience is appropriate for receiving messages about legalized betting on sports.

All in all, the decision this week was a good one for media companies. But whether it will mean, in the short term, a big new source of advertising revenue for stations across the country remains to be seen.

 

Remix Nucleya’s track and win exciting prizes – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... "Indian Electronic Music" - Google News | Scene | Sat 19 May 2018 5:38 am

RadioandMusic.com

Remix Nucleya's track and win exciting prizes
RadioandMusic.com
MUMBAI: Bass Raja Nucleya has stirred many souls with his captivating music. Being a leader in the Indian electronic music producing remixes of popular film music in 2008 he's defined the sound that would become Desi Bass. Now the leader of the Desi ...

Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme