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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » News Feed


LiveCore is a free low-level, live patching for Reaktor

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 20 Sep 2019 1:31 pm

Reaktor lovers no longer have to be jealous of live coders – now they get a performance-ready, free, low-level tool of their own. Sonic mayhem awaits you.

Okay, first – “live coding” doesn’t necessarily have to mean typing. Text is just one way to represent software logic, that is – and tools like Reaktor (and Pd, and Max, and TouchDesigner) simply use a “dataflow” visual representation for that same logic.

Reaktor Blocks now gives you a high-level, Eurorack hardware-style way to patch. But there hasn’t been anything that can exploit the low-level, high power DSP capabilities of Reaktor in real-time.

Enter LiveCore. The goal: “inreasing liveness” when you work with Reaktor, so you can actually patch live. It’s the work of co-creators David Alexander (@freeeco) and Jack Armitage (@jarmitage), and it’s all free and open source on GitHub (provided you have a Reaktor license, of course). And it’s capable of some seriously awesome musical madness:

You actually don’t need to know that much about Core, Reaktor’s low-level DSP objects, to use LiveCore. It effectively makes Core more powerful for existing users, and gives an entry point to people who may have avoided it.

LiveCore gives you a set of modules, each insanely optimized (just a few bytes compiled, and efficient on your machine’s processor). In the first release you’ll find the following – and the developers say more are on the way:

  • Phase Driver
  • Sequencer (quantizes phase Driver Output to make patterns)
  • Splitter
  • Gate
  • Mixer
  • Limiter (not like a traditional audio studio limiter – it’s actually more like a simple two-stage envelope)
  • Waveshaper
  • Reader (intended for sample playback, from a table)

And, like, holy s*** this idea is cool. Everything is built around the Phase Driver – you make one-shot triggers or ramps with that, and then do all your signal mangling and such with the other modules to create interesting patterns for sounds.

It’s also refreshing to have a modular environment that isn’t tied up in a whole bunch of idiosyncratic hardware modules. If you look at the display, it’s very nerdy in appearance, sure. But the actual use of this is so simple that it seems open to exploration, even for people who don’t normally think about patterns in terms of signal flow.

And this looks like a really unique way to approach patterns. That Waveshaper, for instance, can be used to create irregularities and interest in patterns. (There’s also nothing stopping you from routing this to a patch built in Reaktor Blocks, if you really want to.)

This project is brand new, so please don’t immediately bug the developers with too many questions. Documentation is mostly still forthcoming, so you’re pretty much on your own. It seems like they’re progressing quickly, though, and I think you’ll agree – this was too cool not to immediately share.

https://github.com/freeeco/livecore

The post LiveCore is a free low-level, live patching for Reaktor appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Novation Launchkey Mini MK3 is yet another tiny keyboard – so how does it stack up?

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 19 Sep 2019 8:49 pm

Mobile keyboards continue to be fruitful and multiply. But Novation’s latest includes standalone mode, so it isn’t just a computer accessory – so let’s see how this category looks now.

Novation is the company that brought you the workhorse Launchpad grid, so anyone wanting a keyboard with colored grids on it would do well to take notice. But the MK3 adds some features its predecessors lacked – starting with the ability to work with gear minus the computer. New on the MK3:

  • Standalone mode and MIDI. There’s just a 3.5mm MIDI out jack, but combined with functionality that works without a host, you can now use this little keyboard with gear and not just a computer.
  • Fixed chord mode. Even for those of us with keyboard chops, this is useful on a small keyboard or in dance music contexts. New on the MK3.
  • Arpeggiator. New on the MK3, and puts the Novation in contention with offerings labeled Akai and Arturia.
  • Pitch/mod wheel. MK3 adds these as touch strips; the Launchkey 25/49/61 have pitch and mod, but it’s new on the Mini line.
  • RGB backlight. Yes, yes, more disco lights – but this also shows more information, matching colors to clips you’re launching and indicating status. Also new on MK3.

There’s also a Capture MIDI button, which lets you grab ideas even if you haven’t hit record. That’s now in Ableton Live, too, but it’s great that with the keyboard, this works everywhere.

And existing standard features from the Launchkey mini are here too:

  • Scene/clip launch (for Ableton and Novation software – this is a Launchpad).
  • Velocity sensitive keys and pads. Also standard on the Launchkey line. Velocity is actually missing on the Launchpad mini, meaning if you want triggering and velocity, this is a better bet.
  • Bus power.

There’s additionally now a bunch of bundled stuff from AAS, Softube, Spitfire Audio, XLN Audio and Klevgrand, and Novation now does a free membership. No, that isn’t some elaborate “cloud/subscription” feature – they just send you stuff from partners “every couple of months,” which may be more what you want, anyway.

https://novationmusic.com/keys/launchkey-mini

This does make the Novation offering competitive, no doubt – not least because of Novation’s uniquely close relationship to Ableton Live, but likely just as useful with other DAWs (via Mackie HUI, which works with just about anything).

Here’s a hands-on review by loopop:

This also to me gives it a major edge over, say, Native Instruments’ keyboards, which work only when connected to a computer. That makes their Komplete Kontrol line desirable if you’re mainly interested in plug-in integration, but fairly useless if you want it to do double-duty with gear and not have to boot your laptop.

And that’s true of many other keyboards, too. Akai’s APC and MPK mini keyboards have some nice features and low prices, but they only work with a computer. (The MPK mini now has standalone sounds, but no MIDI out apart from USB.) And now Novation has added one of the features I like best on the MPK – the arpeggiator.

So this is really down to Arturia and Novation if you want something you can use on its own with your gear, as well as with a computer.

Arturia’s Keystep has a step sequencer and more dedicated arpeggiator functionality and controls. It lacks the pads and their accompanying trigger/DAW features.

So Novation gives you a still-usable arpeggiator but additional pad and trigger features.

Previously:

The post Novation Launchkey Mini MK3 is yet another tiny keyboard – so how does it stack up? appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Comment Dates Set on FCC Rulemaking to Review LPFM Rules and FM/TV Channel 6 Issues

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Thu 19 Sep 2019 3:53 pm

The FCC’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on LPFM and Channel 6 TV issues, which we wrote about here, was published in the Federal Register today. This sets the deadline for comments in this proceeding as October 21, 2019, with reply comments due by November 4. This proceeding looks at issues including whether to remove all restrictions on LPFM stations’ use of directional antennas as well as whether such stations can use on-channel boosters to fill in gaps in their service areas. The rulemaking will also seek to resolve whether limitations should be lifted on locating FM educational stations near to TV channel 6 stations when the FM station is operating in the reserved band at the low end of the FM dial. The protections of these channel 6 TV stations from reserved-band FMs are based on the performance of analog TV receivers – which have not been a real concern for almost a decade since the TV digital transition. The rulemaking also seeks comments on whether LPTV stations operating on channel 6 can continue, after their digital conversion, to broadcast an analog audio signal capable of being received on most FM receivers (allowing these stations, sometimes referred to as “Franken FMs,” to operate as FM stations). If you are interested in any of these topics, be prepared to submit your comments to the FCC by October 21.

10 Early-’00s Big Room House Tracks That Can Still Be Used To Pump Up Dance Floors Today

Delivered... Derek Opperman | Scene | Thu 19 Sep 2019 2:41 pm

The post 10 Early-’00s Big Room House Tracks That Can Still Be Used To Pump Up Dance Floors Today appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

NIGHTMARE FESTIVAL IS A NICHE HALLOWEEN FESTIVAL THAT BRINGS AN INTIMATE FESTIVAL EXPERIENCE

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 18 Sep 2019 6:20 pm
It's a smaller niche Halloween festival that brings a more intimate experience than the huge EDM festivals with huge crowds.

FCC Delays Due Date for Biennial Ownership Reports – But Don’t Forget Other Important Dates for Reg Fees, EAS Test Forms, and New FM Application Forms Next Week

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Wed 18 Sep 2019 3:37 pm

The FCC yesterday announced that the due dates for Biennial Ownership Reports, which had been December 1 of this year, will now be January 31, 2020. The Order announcing that action is available here.  The FCC notice says that this additional time is needed to make updates to the ownership forms in the LMS database in which they are filed. The window for filing these reports will open on November 1.  The information to be reported in these biennial ownership reports needs to be accurate as of October 1, 2019, which is unchanged from the requirement before yesterday’s announcement.  The FCC is attempting to create a stable database of the ownership of stations, taken on October 1 every two years. While this is not the first time that the FCC has delayed the actual filing date for the Biennial Ownership Reports (see for instance the delay moving the last filing date from the originally scheduled 2017 into early 2018), they always want a snapshot of broadcast ownership as of October 1 of odd numbered years – even wanting reports from owners of stations on October 1 who sold those stations before the report filing deadline.

While the FCC has given broadcasters more time to file the Biennial Ownership Reports, broadcasters should not forget the three important dates next week that we have highlighted in recent days. These dates are:

  1. As we wrote yesterday, the FCC announced last week that FM radio (including translators and LPFM stations) will now use the LMS electronic filing systems for all applications for construction permits and license applications.  This is another step in the FCC’s transition from the CDBS database that broadcasters have used for years, to LMS.
  2. Broadcasters need to remember to file by Monday, September 23, their ETRS Form Three.  This form reports in detail on the station’s experiences in August’s Nationwide EAS Test.  For more details, see our article here.
  3. Finally, commercial broadcasters need to remember to submit their annual regulatory fees by next Tuesday, September 24.  For more information, see our articles here and here.

 

Extreme dub delay, in the new Ninja Tune-Erica Zen Delay

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 18 Sep 2019 1:39 pm

We can talk a lot about engineering. But at some point, you pack vacuum tubes and DSP and chips together, and you get a delay that’s extreme enough to have Ninja Tune and Coldcut printed on it.

Yes, meet the Zen Delay, a new unique stereo delay from Erica Synths, but carrying the Ninja Tune label on it. So, yeah, the record industry is now so bad, we’re making analog delays. Wait – that’s kind of awesome. Stereo delays are more fun to some of us than records, anyway.

Now, I’ve known about this thing for quite a while, so if it seems like I’m raving, I’m not getting that from the press release. Dr. Walker, the underground acid master from Germany, first clued me in to this project with Matt Black, Ninja and Coldcut co-founder. Ninja’s logo is on it, but it’s really both the baby of Ingmar and Matt – part Air Liquide, part Coldcut – with all the sound elements from Riga’s Erica.

The idea is pretty simple: make a stereo delay that you can dial from gentle stereo warmth and space all the way up to extreme dub and screaming overdrive.

Erica sent me a late-stage prototype to test, and I spent a lot of time with it. The trick here is really the combination of analog and digital ingredients:

Stereo delay. You get a precise, full-ranging stereo dub delay, with as little as 1ms all the way up to 5 seconds, and it’s syncable.

And thanks to being digital, you can choose what that delay is – tape, tape pingpong, “digital” (sounding more or less like your basic digital delay), or a special fifth mode. (On mine, that fifth mode was something called “crossover,” which wasn’t terribly useful. Now, it’s a vintage delay with some nice lo-fi touches, I’m told, but I haven’t yet gotten to test it, as it’s actively in development.

Multi-mode filter. There’s a 24dB filter with resonance, which you can use in lowpass, highpass, or bandpass modes.

Valves! Valve saturation and overdrive are what really complete the package – you’ll spot that lovely tube popping out of the top.

Tempo controls. There’s CV in, plus MIDI in, plus tap tempo, so you can use external time, free time in milliseonds, or tap in a tempo.

There’s also clock division, in “beat” mode (which wasn’t available yet on the firmware I first tested). Push and hold the TAP button, and the delay time knob becomes clock divider/multiplier – down to an eighth of the beat, and up to 8 times the beat. (This will actually increase the potential length of the delay up to 50 seconds, so I guess fast bathroom breaks are now possible onstage!)

High-quality digital engine. High-spec ADC and DAC combine with a 24-bit, 48k digital engine.

Stereo (1/4″) jack ins, stereo jack outs, MIDI in, CV in (on full-sized jack, not minijack), plus 12V power.

So in other words, you get the precision and precise timing of the digital delay, plus the ability to choose different delay models in a single unit. But the overall impact is very, very dirty, when you want it to be – thanks to that analog overdrive. So when you want warmth or grime or total insanity, you can dial that in.

“Complete package” and “dialing” are also essential, because Erica have really leaned in to the heavy, vintage, metal feeling of the box. It’s 870 grams of metal here (almost two pounds), with one-knob-per control, and each knob is a big, smooth-feeling dial.

This is a box for your hands, not your feet – something that you do want to reach out and grab and adjust. That makes it ideal for studio and live production. I can absolutely see wanting this live.

Erica have been in this territory before, with their screaming Acidbox (based on the Polivoks filter, and sounding just as angry and Soviet), and the Fusionbox. The Acidbox is terrific, but it’s like having a giant bottle of hot sauce at the ready – it’s just this mental USSR-style filter. The Fusionbox is the nearer comparison, and it might still be the one you want, since it has flanger and ensemble stereo in addition to delay.

But make no mistake – as a dubby delay, the Zen Delay is just about perfect. Easy access to the Drive setting, the useful dubby delay modes, and that magical distortion make it something truly special. And it’s only something Erica could do – it combines their custom DSP, their lovely Latvian-made chips, and this analog into one box.

To anyone who says no one is “innovating,” maybe it’s just a misunderstanding of what musical innovation is. Erica’s creation here is a kind of new vintage. The starting point is some traditions, but constructed into something that you haven’t had before – which is basically what instrument design has always been about.

Pricing: pre-order at €499 + VAT, with the first 300 units with a limited edition Zen Delay t-shirt at a discounted €454 + VAT, from the Ninja Tune and Erica Synth websites.

Ships in December.

https://www.ericasynths.lv/shop/standalone-instruments-1/zen-delay/

Now, you may or may not have half a grand to spend on a delay that you won’t get until Christmas. But, if you do, this is clearly a nice way to go about it.

I’m editing some sounds and will post at the end of the day. But this short video with The Bug sums it up beautifully:

The press release claims this is the first effects unit to be produced by an electronic label, though I’m not entirely certain that’s correct. (Some CDM reader probably has a tiny label that ran off a few pedals, I’m guessing, before I jump out on a limb and go along with the claim!)

The post Extreme dub delay, in the new Ninja Tune-Erica Zen Delay appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

LIGHTNING IN A BOTTLE HAS MUSIC, ART, WORKSHOPS AND MORE

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 17 Sep 2019 7:00 pm
Lightning In a Bottle is created by The Do Lab as both a music festival and a sustainability festival. Get all the details!

FM Radio Construction Permit and License FCC Applications Moving to New Database Next Week

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 17 Sep 2019 5:09 pm

If you have a commercial or noncommercial FM radio station, an LPFM or an FM translator, and are looking to file an FCC application to seek a construction permit to authorize technical changes to your station, or to file a license to cover changes that were previously authorized (or which need no prior authorization), starting next Wednesday, September 25, you’ll need to file in the FCC’s LMS database, not in CDBS which has traditionally been used for broadcast applications. The FCC made this announcement in a Public Notice released last week. The Commission is gradually transitioning all of its broadcast applications to this database (TV broadcasters have already transitioned, except for assignment and transfer of control applications, and radio stations have already been required to use it for ownership reports and license renewal applications).

Starting on September 25, the following forms will be filed in LMS – and CDBS will no longer be used:

Application Type CDBS Form to be Decommissioned Sept. 25, 2019 LMS Schedule to be Used Commencing Sept. 25, 2019
Application for Construction Permit for Commercial FM Broadcast Station Form 301 Schedule 301
Application for FM Broadcast Station License Form 302 Schedule 302
Application for Construction Permit for a Low Power FM Broadcast Station Form 318 Schedule 318
Application for a Low Power FM Broadcast Station License Form 319 Schedule 319
Application for Construction Permit for Reserved Channel Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Station Form 340 Schedule 340
Application for Authority to Construct or Make Changes in a FM Translator or FM Booster Station Form 349 Schedule 349
Application for an FM Translator or FM Booster Station License Form 350 Schedule 350

Note that AM construction permit and license applications, many of which are still filed on paper because of the complexity of the engineering exhibits, are not yet transitioning to the new system. Assignments and transfers also are not covered by this notice, but you can expect those applications to make the change in the not-too-distant future. So remember to use the new system for any CP or license applications to be filed starting on September 25, 2019.

How focusing on one tool cured writers block, and made one sharp, chilly, ‘stoic’ EP

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 17 Sep 2019 5:04 pm

Tools and technology are often described as obstacles. But sometimes focusing on a tool can refine musical process and composition – as main(void) reveals.

And yes, the goal here is, as always, to cure writers’ block and finish something that you feel really happy with. Let’s first hear the finished item, as it’s got the kind of deliciously calculated, precise electronics that first drew me to Europe. It feels chilly, but still sensual – foreplay for cyborgs, you know, putting the tech in techno:

Working musicians all have to balance different gigs. An emerging role for us is working out how to take day jobs in designing tools and sound design, and use that experience to help us make our creative musical experience better.

In the case of main(void), aka Jan Ola Korte, it meant parlaying his work in 2018 designing sounds for Native Instruments’ TRK-01 into honing his music making process. He writes:

When I was working on the sound design for Native Instruments TRK-01 in 2018, I saved a few presets to use in my own music. These sounds and patterns ended up becoming the foundation of Stoicism, my first solo EP that was released Aug 21 on Spatial Cues. I had a little bit of a writer’s block situation, so I tried to resolve it by working within very restrictive parameters. All five original tracks on Stoicism use TRK-01 as the only sound source, processed through a number of effect plug-ins. Limiting myself in this way created a nicely coherent sound palette. Since I only used TRK-01’s internal sequencers, I arranged the tracks via automation in Ableton Live, which switched up my routine in an inspiring way. In the end, this workflow not only resolved the writer’s block but led to my most comprehensive release so far.

The basic idea of TRK-01 is to do just that – it puts some focused modules dedicated to dance production in a single place. There’s a kick module, bass, sequencer, and effects – but it’s not preset territory, as each module has a number of different engines. That is, the clever twist here is removing cognitive overhead (by simplifying and integrating the interface), without limiting your creative choices (since there is still a full spectrum of very different sounds you can get out of each module).

Even with that being said, you still might not be certain how to turn this into a completed track. Now, each person will find a different pathway there, but seeing how Jan works – a bit like working with a studio mate – can often give you that “ah ha, I could actually learn from this” feeling.

Jan asked if he should do a full narrated look at his working method. Answer: aber ja.

By the way, of course this also means that by keeping this focused, adapting the release to a live gig is far easier. You’ll be able to catch main(void) live at Griessmuhle, alongside some very special DJ friends like DJ Pete, Alinka, and Qzen, plus some great names, in late October in Berlin.

More music:

Site: http://www.spatialcues.com/

Oh and yeah, go grab the music on Bandcamp! This is the them problem with promo pools, I see some huge names are playing these tracks out but they got the music for free.

The post How focusing on one tool cured writers block, and made one sharp, chilly, ‘stoic’ EP appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Full Program For The 2019 Edition Of Telekom Electronic Beats’ Festival In Budapest

Delivered... Derek Opperman | Scene | Tue 17 Sep 2019 3:21 pm

The post The Full Program For The 2019 Edition Of Telekom Electronic Beats’ Festival In Budapest appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Here’s the editor-plugin the underrated Elektron Model:Samples is missing

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 17 Sep 2019 3:12 pm

We’ve been following Momo Müller’s software add-ons for a while. But this latest addition for Elektron’s Model:Samples is special, because it unlocks some of the power of this budget box.

Part of what’s great about the Model:Samples is that it does surface a whole bunch of stuff on the main panel for hands-on control. But that doesn’t mean everything is there. Momo’s newest editor and plug-ins gets you at the rest:

  • Full parameter access across all six tracks
  • Easier access to those hidden LFO and FX settings
  • Direct selection of patterns
  • Solo for all six tracks
  • X/Y pads – which Momo suggests you might want to assign to faders for track levels/crossfading

And all of this is integrated with the DAW, which combines nicely with the Elektron’s audio interface functionality.

You get standalone and VST versions for the Mac and Windows, plus Mac AU. There are even 32-bit versions if you have an older system.

https://elektron-model-samples-editor.jimdofree.com

I bring this up because if it’s really a sampler you want, the Elektron may have an edge on the Roland MC-101 (finishing that review this week). It’s a unique box, and I think uniquely playable addition to rigs without blowing the bank. Check out our full review:

Plus the feature that might put it over the top for you:

Andreas Roman has another review for us this week – I’m finishing editing now – on the 1010 Blackbox. So you have three very different compact sample-based boxes to consider now, from Roland, 1010, and Elektron. Watch for our full round-up.

The post Here’s the editor-plugin the underrated Elektron Model:Samples is missing appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Erica’s Pico System III is a tiny, 450 EUR West Coast modular rig

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 16 Sep 2019 6:08 pm

The newest Erica system is an exercise in minimalism – analog, fit in a single unit. The price and size are absolutely as low as you can go – but with some deep sound capabilities.

Here’s divkid talking to our friend Girts about this one:

Erica Synths had been telling me this was what they were working on, integrating their analog circuitry and custom design onto a single PCB. That allows the cost savings that squeeze all this power into a 450EUR box, even with case (400 without the case; tax extra for us Europeans as per usual law).

But wow, even knowing this was coming, it’s better than I expected. You get West Coast-style experimentalism, complete with the snappy, percussive sound of LPG (Low Pass Gates) with resonance, and a unique waveshaper and signature Erica Bucket Brigade Delay. I can see why West Coast sounds are catching on – they’re distinctive, and can produce expressive rhythms and timbres both for experimental and dance contexts. And they’re fun – in a way that makes sense in a modular interface, specifically.

Plus all of this is somehow squeezed into something that still has enough mixing and modulation to work well for live performance. It’s no accident that Erica is populated by musicians and runs their own festival – they clearly love making instruments that work live.

All of this does require some insane miniaturization, so if you like spacious layouts for your stubby fingers and clear differentiation of what does what, this is very much the opposite of what you want.

For those of us who like creative systems, tiny things, and staying on a poor experimental artist’s budget, though, it could be a revelation.

Great writeup in German on sequencer.de (for DE speakers):

The post Erica’s Pico System III is a tiny, 450 EUR West Coast modular rig appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

TOMORROWLAND WINTER TICKETS ARE ON SALE!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 16 Sep 2019 6:00 pm
Tomorrowland Winter tickets are now on sale! Get all the details!

Gorgeous new music from Hainbach, like dreams above radio antennas

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Mon 16 Sep 2019 5:55 pm

Hainbach may be known to most as the YouTuber with a bespectacled gaze, talking to you about weird old sound gear. But his ambient music is absolutely beguiling.

Gestures, his new LP this month, is a gauzy, sensitive reverie, as ghosts of piano loops slip between washes of delicate oscillator tones. Nothing is overthought or precious; there’s a gentle openness to each sound.

From the description:

Gestures is an album of disappearing and acceptance. The sense of loss is lifted by interweaving piano phrases, harmonized by fragile oscillators. Gentle movements above radio antennas guided the recording process, adding an incorporeal, dreamlike feel.

Cassettes are sold out, but vinyl is still available.

Digital is through today only name what you want, because the artist says he just wants it to be widely heard.

But maybe there’s the resonance between Hainbach’s art and his YouTube channel – he’s someone who is simply glad to welcome you into his home and share what he’s doing. So that transparency is there in his labor-of-love discussions of his tools, but also there in the easy intimacy of his mixes and compositions, too.

Here’s a new music jam from him, as well:

In art it is possible to create a sense of clarity that is difficult to attain in everyday life. That is a huge attraction to me. Here I am playing the Bellinger eKalimba and OP1 into the Ciat-Lonbarde Plumbutter, with Thyme generating lovely rhythms.

And in case you missed it, our last stop by Hainbach with our new MeeBlip geode:

https://seilrecords.bandcamp.com/album/gestures

The post Gorgeous new music from Hainbach, like dreams above radio antennas appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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