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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » News Feed


Splice Studio is free backup, version control, and collaboration for your DAW

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 19 Apr 2021 8:11 pm

A lot of the solutions you'll see for "collaborating" involve live jamming - even though that's not always what you want. Splice Studio is a free way to keep a project backed up and synced, which is useful solo but absolutely indispensable when working with others.

The post Splice Studio is free backup, version control, and collaboration for your DAW appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Congressional Letter to FCC on CALM Act Violations Puts Focus on FCC Enforcement Issues

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 19 Apr 2021 3:51 pm

As we highlighted yesterday in our weekly summary of regulatory issues for broadcasters, last week saw a letter from Congresswoman Anna Eshoo to the FCC asking for the FCC to review the enforcement of the rules established by the CALM Act, which prohibits loud commercials on TV stations.  The letter cites news reports of thousands of complaints annually to the FCC since the rule’s adoption in 2012 without there ever having been an enforcement action against a station for any violation.  When the CALM Act was passed by Congress, there were many industry questions about how that law could be enforced, as there are many subjective judgments in assessing whether a commercial is louder than the program into which it is inserted (see our article here).  But, ultimately, the FCC adopted rules that were based on industry standards and most parties seemed to believe that they were workable (see our article here about the adoption of those rules).  Like many FCC rules, the CALM Act rules are complaint-driven, and even the article cited by Congresswoman Eshoo recognized the difficulty in assessing the merits of any complaint.

Nevertheless, with this letter and the publicity that it has received in the broadcast trade press, TV stations should carefully review their compliance with the CALM Act rules, as this publicity could signal that the FCC will turn its attention to this issue in the coming months.  In fact, with a Commission that is currently evenly divided between Democrats and Republicans until the vacant seat on the Commission is filled, enforcement of existing FCC rules may well be one place where the current Commission will turn its attention while more controversial (and potentially partisan) rule changes await FCC action.

We have obviously seen some more attention being paid to enforcement issues in recent months.  In addition to the consent decrees signed by hundreds of radio broadcasters for political file violations (see our articles here and here), there have been a recent spate of consent decrees entered into by broadcasters both noncommercial (see our article here) and commercial (see our mention here in one of our weekly updates) based on more general failures to maintain a complete and current online public inspection file.  We have also noted an uptick in questions about EEO performance raised in connection with license renewal application filings.  There have been enforcement inquiry letters sent by the FCC on other issues too, including EAS compliance.  We also noted the recent enforcement updates issued by the FCC reminding broadcasters of their obligations under FCC rules, including the one on sponsorship identification about which we wrote here.  Maybe it is just a perception, but enforcement issues seem to be a priority for the FCC.

Obviously, compliance with FCC rules should always be the highest of priorities among any participants in a heavily regulated industry like broadcasting.  But every now and then, the FCC seems to take steps to remind broadcasters of their obligations.  This seems to be one of those times – so broadcasters, take note.

This Week in Regulation for Broadcasters: April 10, 2021 to April 16, 2021

Delivered... David Oxenford and Adam Sandler | Scene | Sun 18 Apr 2021 1:22 pm

Here are some of the regulatory developments of significance to broadcasters from the last week, with links to where you can go to find more information as to how these actions may affect your operations.

  • According to press reports, broadcasters should pencil in August 11, 2021 on their calendars for the next national test of the Emergency Alert System (EAS). Following the test, broadcasters will need to report to the FCC how their EAS equipment functioned and what, if any, problems were encountered relaying the test message.  This information will be used by the FCC in a report on the readiness of EAS in the event of an activation.
  • The FCC posted an online tutorial for parties interested in participating in Auction 109, the upcoming auction of 136 FM construction permits and 4 AM construction permits which will allow winning bidders to construct new radio stations. The tutorial is available for on-demand viewing on the “Education” tab of the Auction 109 website at http://www.fcc.gov/auction/109.  The window to apply for a construction permit is from 12:00 p.m. Eastern on April 28 to 6:00 p.m. Eastern on May 11.  We wrote about the auction, here.
  • Congresswoman Anna Eshoo (D-CA) wrote to Acting FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel requesting that the agency look at the reported increase in complaints tied to the loudness of TV commercials and, if necessary, take enforcement action under the CALM Act. The letter cites press reports of thousands of consumer complaints to the FCC which never resulted in any enforcement action.  Eshoo sits on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over the FCC, so stations should review CALM Act compliance as this may be an area of FCC review in coming months.  (Eshoo Letter)
  • We reminded broadcasters that, even outside of political windows, they must upload appropriate information to the political files folder in their FCC-hosted online public inspection file reporting on ads that run on their stations addressing controversial issues of public importance. (Broadcast Law Blog article).

Looking ahead to next week, earth stations operating in the C-Band that have been reported as no longer operational or that have not responded to communications from the C-Band Relocation Coordinator must act by April 19 and file with the FCC confirming their continuing operational status or their authorizations will be deleted from the FCC’s database and no longer protected.  While this deadline has been the subject of many trade press reports and some widely distributed memos from law firms, it actually affects only a handful of broadcasters.  Earth station operators that have filed for lump sum reimbursement or have otherwise been in contact with the Relocation Coordinator should not appear on the lists and have no April 19 filing obligation.  We posted the lists and wrote more, here, about the deadline.

Also next week, the FCC will hold its required monthly Open Meeting.  Broadcasters will be watching two agenda items in particular: the vote to adopt new rules for identification of programming that is sponsored by a foreign governmental entity and the vote to adopt a ten-application limit in the upcoming noncommercial, reserved band FM construction permit filing window.  We wrote briefly about these items, here.

AI turns 2D photos into 3D models – and renders KITT from Knight Rider

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 16 Apr 2021 5:57 pm

If you hadn't already noticed that machine learning is hugely helpful for assisting 3D tasks, here's a Pontiac Trans Am and an NVIDIA Omniverse plug-in to drive the point home.

The post AI turns 2D photos into 3D models – and renders KITT from Knight Rider appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Reminder: Issue Ads Require Public File Disclosures Even Outside Political Windows

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Fri 16 Apr 2021 12:21 am

Back in January, we reminded broadcasters that state and local elections, even those held in “off-years” like 2021, still fall within the FCC’s political broadcasting rules.  Virtually all FCC rules, with the exception of reasonable access, apply to candidates for the local school board or town council just as they do for candidates for President – i.e., once you decide to accept an ad for a local candidate, then equal opportunities, lowest unit rates and online public file obligations all apply (see our article here for more information).  But in that article, we did not focus on political issue ads, which also raise their own FCC obligations, particularly with respect to the public file and sponsorship identification.

Unlike candidate ads, or ads dealing with federal issues, ads from non-candidate groups dealing with state and local elections and issues generally do not require price and schedule information to be uploaded to the online political file (unless those ads also mention a federal issue).  However, those ads do require that the public file contain an identification of the sponsor of the ad (address, phone number and contact person should be provided), plus a list of the ad sponsor’s executive officers or the members of its Board of Directors or similar governing board.  Under the FCC’s guidance from 2019 (see our article here), the FCC thinks that most of these organizations will have more than one governing board member, so if you are provided with the name of only one officer or board member, you are required to reach out to the sponsor or their representative and ask if there are others who should be listed.

State issue ads can come in all sorts of forms.  They can be taking positions on local issues (e.g., a zoning controversy or a school bond issue).  They can be dealing with a state-wide issue, like a ballot issue on gambling or cannabis matters, or a state legislative issue (e.g., write your representative in insert state capital here and tell them to vote against the bill to impose a tax on bottles or to vote for a funding proposal for the new sports stadium).  Or they can be supporting or opposing a state or local candidate who is not running for federal office (i.e., a candidate for any office other than President, the US Senate or the House of Representatives).  In any of these instances, the public file disclosure of the identity of the sponsor and the individuals who run it are required, even outside any political window.  They are required whenever these ads are run.

This difference in the way that candidate and issue ads are treated may make for some interesting results in state and local elections.  Third-party groups buying ads to support or oppose a state or local candidate do not have the detailed public file obligations that similar groups would have if supporting or opposing a candidate for the US House of Representatives or the US Senate.  For groups buying in state elections, as long as they do not bring up any federal issues, price information and details of the ad schedule do not appear to be required to be in the public file.  In contrast, a purchase by the candidates themselves (or by an authorized committee or organization) do require that the details as to price, class of time and schedule be posted to the online public file.

But note (as we mentioned in our article linked to above), non-candidate ads on state issues or elections can end up requiring all the price and schedule information, as well as a list of all the issues and candidates mentioned in the ad, where those ads mention any federal issues.  So if a non-candidate group attacks a candidate running for governor, and bases that attack on the candidate’s failure to support the Mexican border wall, or his or her votes for or against some policy while they were in Congress, this may well turn the state issue ad into a federal one – requiring all the detailed information required for a federal issue ad.

This obviously is a complicated issue, so be sure to talk to your own counsel and advisors, especially when ads contain claims that could be related to federal issues.  With the FCC’s review of online public files being such a priority this year, caution is always advised.

Stop what you’re doing to listen game music going very wrong and very polytonal

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 15 Apr 2021 11:04 pm

2021 needs an anthem, and clearly, it's bitonal Nintendo Switch paused game racing music in chaotic dissonance. "Nothing's gonna stop me now."

The post Stop what you’re doing to listen game music going very wrong and very polytonal appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THERE’S A FORBIDDEN KINGDOWM LIVESTRAM HAPPENING THIS WEEKEND!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Thu 15 Apr 2021 8:00 pm
There's a Forbidden Kingdom Fest livestream happening this weekend (Saturday, April 19 at 9:00 PM EST) with Barely Alive, Jessica Audifred, Midnightasaurus, Stellar, OG Nixin, and Virtual Riot.

Acid, further out: check Florian with MeeBlip, 303, and Zen Delay

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 14 Apr 2021 7:27 pm

There's some magic and alchemy in coaxing evocative music out of stuff with knobs, and Florian Meindl's Riemann Kollektion keeps showing up how.

The post Acid, further out: check Florian with MeeBlip, 303, and Zen Delay appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL 2021 DAY LINEUPS ARE OUT! REGISTER FOR TICKETS.

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 14 Apr 2021 7:00 pm
Tame Impala headlines Friday with Megan Thee Stallion and Glass Animals also taking on prime slots, Grenn Day headlines Saturday with Haim and Illenium, and Sunday goes big with Billie Eilish, A$AP Rocky and Young Thug. You have to pre-register to get single-day tickets, it's the only way you'll be able to buy them Ticket registration needs to happen before this Friday, April 16 at 6:00 PM PST. Hit the "Day Tickets" button below to register.

ID700 for iPad reboots the 1987 Buchla 700 – FM, waveshaping, and polyphony (Hands on)

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 13 Apr 2021 1:04 pm

It was the once and future Buchla. But back in 1987, the Buchla 700 was so painfully ahead of its time that ... well, its ideal moment is probably really now, right now, on your iPad. And so you're in luck.

The post ID700 for iPad reboots the 1987 Buchla 700 – FM, waveshaping, and polyphony (Hands on) appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Notch just added killer NVIDIA Broadcast support with cool features like body tracking

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 12 Apr 2021 10:28 pm

So, speaking of NVIDIA goodies and why they're powerful for artists - Notch just added support for all those NVIDIA Broadcaster features covered here in the fall. It's like a motion capture studio and green screen rig, without the studio or screen.

The post Notch just added killer NVIDIA Broadcast support with cool features like body tracking appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE III POINTS LINEUP IS COMPLETE! TICKETS ON THURSDAY.

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 12 Apr 2021 7:00 pm
Eric Prydz, Jamie xx, Black Coffee, Peggy Gou, Slowthai, Maceo Plex, Virgil Abloh, Channel Tres and more. Tickets Thur, April 15 at 11:11AM ET. Find out more.

Surprise – NVIDIA’s AI and graphics news today for big industry is relevant to artists, too

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 12 Apr 2021 6:46 pm

Even as NVIDIA has a keynote with simulated robots making the rounds of a BMW factory, some of the GPU giant's latest brings industry- and enterprise-grade tools to artists, too. That also could prove relevant as the pandemic has folks looking for work.

The post Surprise – NVIDIA’s AI and graphics news today for big industry is relevant to artists, too appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The month’s best albums

Delivered... Electronic music | The Guardian | Scene | Mon 12 Apr 2021 11:30 am

Discover all our four- and five-star album reviews from the last month, from pop to folk and classical

Continue reading...

This Week in Regulation for Broadcasters: April 3, 2021 to April 9, 2021

Delivered... David Oxenford and Adam Sandler | Scene | Sun 11 Apr 2021 2:26 pm

Here are some of the regulatory developments from the last week of significance to broadcasters, with links to where you can go to find more information as to how these actions may affect your operations.

  • The National Association of Broadcasters this week announced that its CEO, Gordon Smith, will be stepping down at the end of the year to be replaced by COO, and former head of Government Relations at the NAB, Curtis LeGeyt. We wrote here about some of the many legal and policy issues likely to be facing the NAB in the coming years.
  • The FCC continues to scrutinize public file compliance in connection with the filing of a license renewal application. After several noncommercial stations entered into consent decrees over non-compliance, commercial stations have started to receive consent decrees, as well.  In the latest example, a Tennessee station had not filed an ownership report since 2012 and had not uploaded any quarterly issues/programs lists to its public file.  The consent decree comes with the requirements to name a compliance officer, adopt a written plan that includes a compliance manual and mandatory training for employees, quickly report future public file violations to the FCC when they are discovered, and file periodic compliance reports with the Commission. (Consent Decree)  As all full-power stations, commercial and noncommercial, should have uploaded Quarterly Issues Programs Lists to their online public file by April 10, this reminder that the FCC is watching stations’ public files is very timely.
  • The FCC reminded full-power TV stations, Class A TV stations, LPTV and TV translator stations, FM radio stations, and multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) that filing deadlines begin in six months for the submission of all remaining invoices for reimbursement for the costs they incurred from the repacking of the TV band following the Incentive Auction. Full-power TV and Class A TV stations that were assigned to repack phases 1-5 have a final invoice submission deadline of October 8, 2021.  Full-power TV and Class A stations assigned to repack phases 6-10 have a deadline of March 22, 2022.  Low power TV stations, TV translators, FM radio stations, and MVPDs have a filing deadline of September 5, 2022.  See the Public Notice for more details on the close-out procedures.  We wrote more about this, here.
  • The FCC issued a Public Notice asking interested parties for comment on whether updates are necessary for the rules that are required to implement the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA). The CVAA is responsible for such agency rules as audio description, accessible emergency information, and closed captioning of video delivered over Internet Protocol.  Comments are due by May 24 and reply comments are due by June 21.  (Public Notice)

Looking ahead to next week, the FCC by Wednesday, April 14 will post an online tutorial to help parties interested in participating in Auction 109, the upcoming auction of 136 FM construction permits and 4 AM construction permits that we wrote about here.  The tutorial will provide information about all aspects of the upcoming auction for the opportunity to construct new radio stations. There will also be a way to ask FCC staff questions about the auction.  Once posted, the tutorial will be accessible on the “Education” tab of the Auction 109 website at http://www.fcc.gov/auction/109 for on-demand viewing.

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