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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » News Feed


Lisbon Beat review – energetic musical odyssey to the city’s edge

Delivered... Peter Bradshaw | Scene | Wed 17 Jul 2019 12:00 pm

This brief but engaging documentary celebrates Lisbon’s vibrant African-Portuguese music scene

There is a short, sharp blast of energy in this brief music documentary by DJ Rita Maia and cinematographer Vasco Viana about the African-Portuguese music scene in Lisbon’s outer suburbs, the “corrugated villages” that appeared after the 1970s. It is not quite right to call this ghetto culture; the milieu is more nuanced and complicated than that in terms of nationality, race, generation and class, although it is certainly pretty male.

The music is an engaging mix of digital and analogue, new and old. A lot of it comes from DJs with Mac Book Pros and music-editing software and who play marathon-length parties. A lot more comes from traditional instruments such as a Ferro player, a percussive instrument lying over the shoulder like a length of steel that produces a weirdly hypnotic thrumming noise, and a kora, a 22-string instrument from west Africa that has been in use for hundreds of years.

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How Nation Of Gondwana Became One Of Germany’s Most Cherished Techno Festivals

Delivered... svt303 | Scene | Wed 17 Jul 2019 11:02 am

The post How Nation Of Gondwana Became One Of Germany’s Most Cherished Techno Festivals appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Court Overturns Requirement that Prescription Drug Advertisers Include Price Information in TV Ads

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 16 Jul 2019 10:08 pm

Last week, a federal District Court ruled that the US Department of Health and Human Services did not have the authority to require that drug manufacturers include pricing information on their television commercialsWe wrote about that requirement, here – a requirement that was supposed to go into effect this summer.  However, the District Court judge found that there was no statutory authority on which HHS could rely for the adoption of this rule.  HHS argued that its authority to adopt rules to administer the Social Security program was sufficient to adopt the advertising requirement as that requirement would lead to lower prices for drugs purchased by those using Social Security.  But, the Court found, Congress did not include any specific language giving HHS authority to regulate advertising on prescription drugs, nor did the Court believe that the required disclosure of pricing information was necessary to “administer” the Social Security program, even if it did have the effect of lowering prices as HHS hoped.  Given this decision, the rules will not go into effect.  Barring an appeal by HHS, it would appear that Congress will have to take action before these rules could be adopted.  So, for now, TV broadcasters will not be seeing mandatory disclosures of drug prices on the ads that they run.

Movers and shakers – Focusrite just bought ADAM [Analysis]

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 16 Jul 2019 4:57 pm

Focusrite went public in 2014, but this week brings its first major acquisition – and it’s a big deal. Monitor maker ADAM from Berlin joins the UK’s Focusrite / Novation / Ampify.

Publicly traded companies and fast growing business empires have a bit of a challenge in the music tech business – music creation is still specialized and places a high standard on quality. So ADAM is at least encouraging as a choice; the boutique maker is highly respected and many studio swear by their monitors.

The ongoing question here is really growth, but of course revenue growth isn’t necessarily limited to downmarket tools with thin margins. ADAM’s strength is building an upmarket, boutique product for music makers. And while the studio in the traditional sense has been in decline, “studio” as in independent producers has potential. Just as Eurorack and boutique synths have proven in the electronic arena, that growing population does have a portion of the market who will pay a premium for perceived quality – just as every market has luxury.

That may seem obvious, but I’ve been surprised that so many conversations about growth in our industry are focused at the low end or beginners. The problem with that commodity end is that competition gets fierce. I find it especially strange, because by contrast, you wouldn’t expect the automotive industry to focus exclusively on cheap cars and first-time buyers. Auto is perfectly comfortable describing engines as things only engineers understand, and marketing that specialization. And they make products for specific, high-end customers (think Formula One racing). And that in turn drives interest across the market, because it strengthens the brand (think Mercedes-Benz Group). But I digress.

Maybe the greater ambition in this acquisition is the talk of the two companies working together. I think it’s fair to be skeptical any time there’s talk of that in acquisitions – the reality is often far tougher. It’s unclear for now what Focusrite Group imagine that collaboration to look like, on what products, or if they’ll be able to deliver. But here’s Focusrite’s CEO Tim Carroll on that topic:

“ADAM Audio is undeniably a leader in the field of electroacoustics. The A7Xs and S3s have become standards in recording spaces across the globe. Even so, I know the team have no interest in resting on their laurels. We need to ensure they receive all the support they require to continue raising the sonic bar. That our two companies are so aligned from a cultural perspective reassures me that, as we increasingly work together, great things will happen. With so much expertise between us in acoustics, sound reproduction, DSP, and control, the opportunities are abundant to refine recording and production workflows together.”

For the time being, ADAM Audio stay in Berlin and keep Christian Hellinger in charge. The 20 year-old company are known for their A7X and S3, and now cover a range of potential markets with the T, AX, and S Series.

I’d actually love to see the kind of collaboration described above – and I’m sure the Focusrite Group engineers would love a trip to Berlin. (Come visit, please!) But while it’s not emphasized in the press release, I imagine the immediate benefit to ADAM will be Focusrite’s international marketing operation, which looks increasingly global with LA and Hong Kong alongside the UK. ADAM Audio already spans the Asian manufacturing world (Dongguan), Berlin’s ongoing dominance in engineering, and then the ever-lucrative US market – Nashville.

And oh yeah – Focusrite is traded on the AIM market, London Stock Exchange. So I imagine some reader of this site just had your stock go up. (No disclosure needed here for me; I would make that statement if I did.)

https://www.adam-audio.com/en/

The post Movers and shakers – Focusrite just bought ADAM [Analysis] appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Learn how to arrange your modular tracks with VCV Rack, Ableton Live

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 16 Jul 2019 1:53 pm

It’s one of the first challenges with any modular – you get a wild banging groove, but then… you’re stuck with it. One new video tutorial suggests a way to arrange your modular with Ableton Live and free VCV Rack software.

Live’s real-time arrangement and triggering features have always been part of its appeal – something exploited by everyone from live electronic musicians to those triggering sounds for radio and theater. Here, it’s a great way to take your cabled modular concoctions and actually turn them into a song structure or live performance. But it may not be immediately obvious to beginners how to go about it.

The inspiring VCV Rack ideas comes to the rescue here. It’s been updated for the just-release VCV Rack 1.0.

Now the audio advice here is actually soon to become outdated – Bridge will go away later this year, and you’ll be able to run Rack as a plug-in. But you can actually skip that part if you want to go another route, and just let Rack control your audio interface and send MIDI from Ableton Live.

(You could also apply this on Linux easily, with Bitwig Studio in place of Live – think I’ll try that myself, in fact.)

But the basic idea here is, run MIDI from Live to Rack, and use clips and scenes to trigger changes. There are some clever ideas about how to map control via CV and MIDI, and then the really important step is adding a physical controller, so you can get your hands on the live performance and improvise.

Note that while this example uses VCV Rack, you could apply the same ideas to any modular with MIDI input – or even mix in a partial or complete hardware set with the same rig. And watching this I also imagine some other ideas for where to go; this is by definition an open-ended process. Have a look:

Have you got another way of working? We’d love to hear about it in comments.

By the way, if you’re at SONAR this week, I’ll be giving a workshop with VCV Rack on Friday. (You need a delegate pass / pre-registration. But of course I’ll share some of how it goes here on CDM soon.)

https://sonarplusd.com/en/programs/barcelona-2019/areas/workshops/the-no-money-modular-synth-for-beginners-with-peter-kirn

Previously:

The post Learn how to arrange your modular tracks with VCV Rack, Ableton Live appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Actions Taken at July Meeting – FCC Adopts Changes to Children’s Television Rules and to TV MVPD Carriage Election Notices Procedures

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 15 Jul 2019 8:44 am

The FCC at its open meeting last week took two actions important to TV broadcasters – modifying its children’s television rules and changing the process by which TV stations give notice to MVPDs of their must carry or retransmission consent elections.  On the children’s television rules, the FCC largely adopted the proposals in their draft order, which we summarized here.  The major additions to the final version of the Order (here) were the individual statements of the Commissioners, where the Republicans supported the decision as a common-sense reaction to changing market conditions (including an increase in the number of over-the-air stations since the rules were initially adopted, as well as all sorts of new media competition), while the Democrats worried that moving some long-form educational and informational programming addressed to children off the broadcaster’s primary program streams, and the replacement of some of that programming with short-form programming, would have an adverse impact on children – particularly children in lower-income households with less access to digital alternatives.  The new rules will become effective after their publication in the Federal Register.  Comment dates on the Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to consider whether TV broadcasters can be relieved of some children’s television obligations by supporting the development of educational and informational programming on other TV stations will also be determined after Federal Register publication.

Also adopted at the meeting was a Report and Order setting out new rules allowing TV broadcasters to give notice of their next set of must-carry or retransmission consent notifications electronically rather than by certified mail, as is currently required.  The Order sets out a process where, before the next election deadline in October 2020, broadcasters need to include in their online public files a statement as to whether they have elected must-carry or retransmission consent on MVPDs in their market (and, if the station has elected one carriage option for all systems, the notice can be as simple as “Station WXYZ has elected must-carry on all cable systems in the Anytown DMA”).  If the station decides to change that election for any MVPD, they notify the MVPD of the change by email.  MVPDs must register a contact person for the receipt of such notices in their public files and in the FCC’s COALS database, so that broadcasters know who to contact if they are planning to change their election.  The broadcaster emails its notice of a changed election to the cable system (with a copy to a new FCC email address) and puts a copy of the election in its online public file.  The cable system is supposed to electronically acknowledge the receipt of the notice (if it does not, the broadcaster is supposed to call the COALS-registered person at the registered phone number to make sure that the notice has been received – but if there is no response, the FCC and public file notices will suffice.  Of course, not having this information in a TV station’s public file would be a violation of the public file rules.

The rules also will apply to noncommercial stations and satellite carriers. Read the full order to capture other intricacies of the new system – but it should make these notices much less costly for all involved.  The Commission also adopted a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking looking to adopt similar rules to allow cable operators to give required notices to broadcasters about issues such as a channel repositioning or a change in a system’s headend electronically.  Look for comment dates in that proceeding soon.  All in all, an eventful FCC meeting for TV broadcasters.

Banks: III review – a break from dark R&B doesn’t quite pay off

Delivered... Aimee Cliff | Scene | Fri 12 Jul 2019 10:00 am

(Harvest Records)
Her third album is a less-than-convincing attempt to lighten the old experimentalism in favour of chart-friendly ballads

LA singer Banks was heralded as part of a wave of “alternative R&B” when she emerged in 2014. Her distorted vocals and experimental beats were categorised alongside Tinashe and FKA twigs – though the latter refuted the label, saying that her music was “punk”, and only tangentially related to R&B. Twigs was right, and with the benefit of hindsight, Banks’s murky trap-pop offerings sound little like the other artists she was grouped together with when she released her debut album, Goddess. After another album and a two-year break, Banks is back with III, an LP that kicks against this pigeonhole with streaming-friendly electronic soul ballads and post-Kanye West maximalist pop (colourful Glaswegian producer Hudson Mohawke had a large hand in the record).

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Watch a beautiful video about vocoder history from The New Yorker

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 12 Jul 2019 9:59 am

It’s time for a throwback – this video was produced in 2014. But don’t miss out on a serious vocoder love fest full of history and celebrity interviews. And just wait, because the vocoder may be about to make an AI-fueled comeback.

The New Yorker talks to the likes of Laurie Anderson, Cozmo D, Dave Tompkins, and Frank Gentge about what made this instrument special, and traces its weird, twisted history through military applications to Kraftwerk parties.

The topic of vocal encoding and the vocoder has become freshly relevant with the rise of machine learning for vocal synthesis. The “AI” trend is driven in no small part by a resurgent vocoder – only this time, powered by neural networks (themselves a revived technology, after a long “winter”). These vocoders use neural networks to “learn” and process, enabled by massively parallel computation on GPUs and specialized “AI” chips:

https://gfx.cs.princeton.edu/pubs/Jin_2018_FAR/reived tec

https://github.com/candlewill/RawNet

… just to give two examples. The expected application of most of this is text-to-speech (TTS). Think talking translators and speaking apps and so on, just more futuristic (or nightmarish, depending on your feelings about that futurism).

But as always with the vocoder, musical applications do have a way of holding their own. Right now, it’s computationally expensive to train vocoders. But it is possible to cheat, by doing most of the pre-training work and then letting a user do some light training at the end. That is, you probably sound similar to other people speaking your native language, so it’s possible to train a machine on those details rather than make it start from scratch.

What I’m getting at: it’s almost inevitable that we’ll soon see musical vocoders and pitch correction that is trained on your voice. And in turn, that could create presets that abuse different vocal characters for various creative impacts. (Maybe there’s something like this now, I just haven’t seen it in the market.)

Whether or not that proves useful, understanding the history of the vocoder means getting a deeper grasp of how communications technology has evolved generally – and how people can push its envelope to make something expressive. Whatever useful applications folks like military leaders may imagine, us humans do love to be human and push the emotional boundaries of the tech we touch.

(Just of course “no one needs a vocoder” – Robert Henke. Okay, he was joking.)

The post Watch a beautiful video about vocoder history from The New Yorker appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Leakage is a freaky Ableton Live bass machine, Wavetable monster, from $0

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 10 Jul 2019 3:00 pm

It’s an automatic glitching bass. It’s a transformative set of 128 Wavetable sounds. It’s a Max for Live chaining device. It’s all of that – it’s Leakage, the free/pay-what-you-will Ableton Live creation from Tom Cosm.

The idea is to give you ever-changing bassline sounds each time you hit a note, for colorful and glitchy results. To pull that off, you get a number of features:

  • 128 custom Wavetable presets
  • Max for Live device that switches sounds
  • Preset switching, via chains – 128 chains, one for each sound
  • 8 parameters per sound: chain, filter amount, filter attack, filter decay, “grunt” (wavetable morphing), modulation amount, modulation rate, “special alpha” (per-sound parameter)
  • Set number of steps, up to 128, to determine rate of change
  • “Count MIDI” sets the step size to the number of notes in the active clip
  • Velocity-based switching

Watch:

An introduction to Leakage.

Tom says this is the culmination of five years of work, but he’s been waiting for Ableton Live 10.1 and the processing bandwidth of current machines to unleash this. You’ll need of course Live 10.1 with Wavetable and a Max for Live license (probably, but not limited to, Suite).

This is pay what you want, starting at $0 to download. If you do put in some money, you’ll be added to an early access list for promised future editions, with bassline, lead, and effect features.

It’s really encouraging to hear Tom talk about how well that’s worked:

“To be honest, it blew my mind how many of you made a contribution. People chipped in 1, 2 or 5 bucks… but a lot of you did! It was so much it covered my rent and bills for a month, freeing up my time so I could work on this Leakage release. I was totally blown away by the generosity, so I am going to keep rolling with this system. Even if it’s just 2 dollars, it all adds up and means I can keep pumping out new and exciting tools, without having to restrict the availability to people who have money.”

Check it out:

Leakage from Tom Cosm [Gumroad]

The post Leakage is a freaky Ableton Live bass machine, Wavetable monster, from $0 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Club Histories and Geographies at WHOLE, A 3-Day Queer Music Festival In Rural Germany

Delivered... Derek Opperman | Scene | Wed 10 Jul 2019 10:24 am

The post Club Histories and Geographies at WHOLE, A 3-Day Queer Music Festival In Rural Germany appeared first on Telekom Electronic Beats.

Mother Earth’s Plantasia: the cult album you should play to your plants

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Tue 9 Jul 2019 3:00 pm

It was made by an easy-listening songwriter and given away free with mattresses. Now thanks to YouTube’s algorithm, Mort Garson’s Plantasia has become an underground hit

In the early noughties, Caleb Braaten was working in a secondhand record shop in Denver, Colorado, when he came across an album that looked intriguing. The cover of Mother Earth’s Plantasia featured a cartoon of two people cuddling a houseplant, and came with a free horticultural booklet. Best of all, it claimed that its intended audience wasn’t human: you were supposed to play its “warm Earth music” to plants “to aid in their growing”.

“So I put it on and, man, I absolutely immediately fell in love with it,” says Braaten, who now runs Sacred Bones Records. “There’s something about it that is immediately nostalgic. It takes you to this warm place in the past. It’s tickling those same senses as something from your childhood. I think people who didn’t even grow up with that stuff also feel that same warm sensation of … I don’t know. It’s very interesting.”

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More Time for Comments on DOJ Review of ASCAP and BMI Consent Decrees – Now Due August 9

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Tue 9 Jul 2019 2:43 pm

In a very important proceeding we summarized here, the Department of Justice’s Antitrust Division is reviewing the antitrust consent decrees that govern ASCAP and BMI – the decrees that require that these performing rights organizations treat similarly situated licensees (and artists) in the same way and which allow a Court to review the reasonableness of the rates that ASCAP and BMI propose. Those comments were initially due tomorrow, but the DOJ announced on its website that the comment deadline has been extended until August 9, giving interested parties more time to prepare and document their submissions.  As broadcasters and internet audio companies rely on the consent decrees to regulate the fees that they pay for the public performance of musical compositions, this extension should give more parties the opportunity to consider how important these decrees are to the efficient operation of the entertainment marketplace and file their comments by the new deadline.

Vector dreams, in a new book on sound-modulated light

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 9 Jul 2019 2:04 am

Like alien artifacts dug up in sci-fi, once-forgotten technologies are resurfacing as newly futuristic. And so behold vector synthesis – that moment when signal for light and sound intertwines.

It’s all the topic of a new book from artist/technologist Derek Holzer. Here’s how in-demand this story is: a mere glimpse of his MA thesis on the topic already drummed up demand for a printed copy. That edition gets a Kickstarter boost in Vector Synthesis: a Media Archaeological Investigation into Sound-Modulated Light.

And the Cathode Ray Tube gets a new lease on life.

Derek isn’t just digging into media archaeology. He’s also part of a movement to resurrect this vector tech – and the audiovisual fusion inspired by it – through events, workshops, and open source tools. (Just beware – one day, you’re pahttps://www.kickstarter.com/projects/macumbista/vector-synthesis-book?fbclid=IwAR0KOwytiUkH6pqJNly9LZ0xd0NP33ldZFrNyrCKax-P7aqhtZMtSAQgC-Mtching in Pure Data, the next, you may be rummaging through display tubes.)

Artists:

Mary Ellen Bute, Ben Laposky, Lyn Lye, Norman McLaren, Desmond Paul Henry, James Whitney, John Whitney Sr., Dan Sandin, Steina Vasulka, Woody Vasulka, Larry Cuba, Bill Etra, Mitchell Waite, Rosa Menkman, Cracked Ray Tube, Andrew Duff, Benton C. Bainbridge, Philip Baljeu, Jonas Bers, Robin Fox, Robert Henke, Ivan Marušić Klif, Jerobeam Fenderson, Hansi Raber, Ted Davis, Roland Lioni, Bernhard Rasinger, and the Kikimore group.

The book traverses history, philosophy, and a decent amount of practical experimentation – it’s history and how-to and invention all at once. That’s perhaps fitting for today’s media art. It’s not just a whiz-bang demo of something new that fades. It’s practice and technique, in a time-warp jump between past and future.

25EUR gets you a copy in a beautiful edition with 122 pages.

And yeah, we’ve covered this phenomenon before:

Check out the book now on Kickstarter.

More (ah, okay, WordPress even embeds this for me now automatically – neat):

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/macumbista/vector-synthesis-book

The post Vector dreams, in a new book on sound-modulated light appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

How to patch 3D visuals in browser from Ableton Live, more with cables.gl

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 8 Jul 2019 6:02 pm

Now, even your browser can produce elaborate, production-grade eye candy using just some Ableton Live MIDI clock. The question of how to generate visuals to go with music starts to get more and more interesting answers.

And really, why not? In that moment of inspiration, how many of us see elaborate fantastic imagery as we listen to (or dream about) music. It’s just been that past generative solutions were based on limited rules, producing overly predictable results. (That’s the infamous “screensaver” complaint.) But quietly, even non-gaming machines have been adding powerful 3D visualization – and browsers now have access to hardware acceleration for a uniform interface.

cables.gl remains in invite-only beta, though if you go request one (assuming this article doesn’t overwhelm one), you can find your way in. And for now, it’s also totally free, making this a great way to play around. (Get famous, get paid, buy licenses for this stuff – done.)

MIDI clock can run straight into the browser, so you can sync visuals easily with Ableton Live. (Ableton Link is overkill for that application, given that visuals run at framerate.) That will work with other software, hardware, modular, whatever you have, too.

For a MIDI/DJ example, here’s a tutorial for TRAKTOR PRO. Obviously this can be adapted to other tools, as well. (Maybe some day Pioneer will even decide to put MIDI clock on the CDJ. One can dream.)

They’ve been doing some beautiful work in tutorials, too, including WeaveArray and ColorArray, since I last checked in.

The post How to patch 3D visuals in browser from Ableton Live, more with cables.gl appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FCC Highlights State EAS Plans – Is Your Station Doing What It is Supposed to Be Doing?

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 8 Jul 2019 4:10 pm

The FCC earlier last week posted on its Blog an article from the Chief of its Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau about state EAS plans, stressing how important these plans are to making sure that any emergency message conveyed through an EAS alert is properly transmitted to all who are supposed to receive it, so that it ultimately reaches the members of the public who should be aware of the emergency situation which triggered the alert.  The article contains a link to all of the state EAS plans that have been submitted to and approved by the FCC.  The FCC urges that state EAS managers regularly review and send updates to these plans to the FCC at least yearly and urges stations to review the plans to make sure that they comply with their state requirements by monitoring the stations or other sources that they are supposed to monitor to get the emergency information which they relay to the public.  As broadcast employees and stations change ownership and call letters change over time, it is important that stations review their state plan and alert their state EAS committee of any needed changes. Only with an updated and accurate plan can the FCC be assured that word gets out to the right people in the event of an emergency.  A link to the state plans available is available here on the FCC website.

The need to review these plans is particularly important given the upcoming EAS test. As we wrote here, a Nationwide EAS test is scheduled for August 7. All broadcast stations have an obligation to report to the FCC on their ability to receive and retransmit the nationwide test. Last week was the due date for the updating of ETRS Form One which makes sure that information about EAS participating stations is accurate. Once the test is conducted, stations need to report on the day of the test, using ETRS Form Two, whether they received and broadcast the alert message. Flaws in EAS operations and incorrect monitoring of assigned stations could become evident at that time. So this is a good time to check your monitoring assignments and the state of your EAS equipment to make sure that, when the test is conducted, your station will be able to report that it received the alert as expected and, more importantly, in the event that there is a real emergency, your station will be in a position to relay important emergency information.

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